Bike hazard test

#1
Feeling in need of a mid-life crisis, I've booked myself on a CBT, with the intention of taking the DAS route to full licence. Did my car test back in 1984 via the mil driving course (full of nice easy tests, like reading the reg plate of a car parked outside the office and a big hint to look at the plate).

I've tried the on-line theory tests on the DVLA site; simple enough. But what is this hazard test? The explanation is straightforwards, but what actually is it, and how does it work?
 
#2
Its a hazard perception test. Its part of the theory test now. I passed my bike licence last year and unfortunately you have to do your theory again for your bike licence. The hazard perception is pretty much a series of videos you watch. When you think you see a hazard you press the button to confirm you have spotted it. Just pressing the button randomly means you lose points and fail. The funny thing is (when I did it anyway), the hazard perception is taken from the view of being in a car!
 
#3
Feeling in need of a mid-life crisis, I've booked myself on a CBT, with the intention of taking the DAS route to full licence. Did my car test back in 1984 via the mil driving course (full of nice easy tests, like reading the reg plate of a car parked outside the office and a big hint to look at the plate).

I've tried the on-line theory tests on the DVLA site; simple enough. But what is this hazard test? The explanation is straightforwards, but what actually is it, and how does it work?
So it'll be a Harley then..??
 
#4
The hazard perception test is simple enough, AA driving school - Hazard perception test - AAttitude for an example. The key thing about hazards is that they are both 'developing' and the sort of thing where you will have to take some action.

For example cars on the other side of the road, bends and junctions don't apply. What you will see is a pedestrian start to run out in the road, or a car pull out in front of you. Usually forcing the driver to slow down.

The trick is though, if you have have been driving for a while that you might click early. I tended to click when I first saw the hazard then again as I got closer and then again as it developed, so I got at least some points. For most I got 5 (maximum) although one I clicked too often and got zero but seriously man, there were HAZARDS! EVERYWHERE! I'd have gotten off the bike and walked into town :)

There are numerous examples on the tinternet. Good luck! I did my DAS about 18 months ago, wish I'd done it sooner.
 
#6
Just to back up WhatAmIDoing I did one for fun when my wife did her test, failed it abysmally, purely because I was spotting the hazard before the system thought i should do.

Classic one being a cyclist coming down a footpath from the left, I see a helmet over the hedge heading my way, I click, I see the cyclist passing a gap in the hedge, I click....both too early for the system which believes it is only a hazard once you can see the whole cyclist and they are about to jump infront of you on the road....

But as others say, there are tests online and some good explainations of the logic.

S_R
 
#7
as others have said here before. if you already drive you will click far to early. if you click on when you think it is too late you will probably get full marks.

most bike schools can lend you a practice disk with lots of tests on it. use it, as you will find that what you and the testers consider hazards may be completley different things.

good luck

sent using the power of voodoo and a shite samsung phone.
 
#8
I believe you pass the test by recognising the word O..V.....L.........O.................V..........

As it's the last thing you see as you bounce over a Volvo's bonnet.
 
S

syledis

Guest
#9
Feeling in need of a mid-life crisis, I've booked myself on a CBT, with the intention of taking the DAS route to full licence. Did my car test back in 1984 via the mil driving course (full of nice easy tests, like reading the reg plate of a car parked outside the office and a big hint to look at the plate).

I've tried the on-line theory tests on the DVLA site; simple enough. But what is this hazard test? The explanation is straightforwards, but what actually is it, and how does it work?
Main hazards are cnuts in BMW,s ..oh hang on a minute.........
 
#10
Main hazards are cnuts in BMW,s ..oh hang on a minute.........
Well they are useful for something, then. I, on the other hand, in a BMW am useful purely for overtaking you. :)
 
#11
#13
But I called you 57 times a day! Oh wait a minute... you mean that wasn't you??!!
 
#16
Oh dear, I'm afraid I don't possess his easy, laid back manner and high degree of tolerance :(

Having said that.. at 5min I'd have nutted the little tw@t, helmet on.

edit: having just watched the whole clip.... Git!
 
#17
Just to back up WhatAmIDoing I did one for fun when my wife did her test, failed it abysmally, purely because I was spotting the hazard before the system thought i should do.

Classic one being a cyclist coming down a footpath from the left, I see a helmet over the hedge heading my way, I click, I see the cyclist passing a gap in the hedge, I click....both too early for the system which believes it is only a hazard once you can see the whole cyclist and they are about to jump infront of you on the road....

But as others say, there are tests online and some good explainations of the logic.

S_R
Like any test, the trick is to answer in the way the test expects you to rather than in your own way and fail. Proper preparation is the key - whether you think you know it all or not - so that you can learn how to respond and pass.

As to another poster saying "unfortunately you have to do your theory again for your bike licence " ....... why is it unfortunate ? Many middle agers will not have done a theory test ever and we all know if we did one that we immediately forgot it all. Never a bad thing to re-brush up on your knowledge and have proof of whether you remember or not than some vague, personal belief you know as much as you ever did ;-)

I did mine 4 years ago and my wife just did her theory and is now doing her DAS. Way better now than the days of a quick trip around the block and a hearty " best of luck" IMHO.
 
#18
The hazard perception test is simple enough, AA driving school - Hazard perception test - AAttitude for an example. The key thing about hazards is that they are both 'developing' and the sort of thing where you will have to take some action.

For example cars on the other side of the road, bends and junctions don't apply. What you will see is a pedestrian start to run out in the road, or a car pull out in front of you. Usually forcing the driver to slow down.

The trick is though, if you have have been driving for a while that you might click early. I tended to click when I first saw the hazard then again as I got closer and then again as it developed, so I got at least some points. For most I got 5 (maximum) although one I clicked too often and got zero but seriously man, there were HAZARDS! EVERYWHERE! I'd have gotten off the bike and walked into town :)

There are numerous examples on the tinternet. Good luck! I did my DAS about 18 months ago, wish I'd done it sooner.
Just tried the AA one. I'm lost as to whether there were five 'hazards' or one - the cyclist! Thats the sort of test I don't like, as someone else pointed out, its from the view of a car not a bike, and in many ways is subjective.

Ho hum. The Kawasaki is delivered today... allegedly.
 
#19
C'mon - plenty of people - some even as thick as me - manage to pass the theory test all the time. Including spotty 17 year olds.

What is it that people are afraid of ? Being SO 'clever' that they fail ? Not having the confidence to study for and pass it ? In which case perhaps riding a motorcycle isn't really for you ......

Load of fuss about nothing. IF you want to ride a bike THAT badly, you'll do everyhting necessary to be able to legally ride one. And it is worth the 'hassle' :)
 
#20
Nothing to do with being "too clever", lazy, or afraid... Simply that I have problems with 'designed by committee' exams. When I tried the AA practice exams, I wasn't sure what was classed as a hazard, and no idea of what I had done right afterwards.

When I did my driving test, for example, a bend was a hazard, which is why you slow down entering a bend and accelerate out of it.


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