Big Brother Blunkett

#1
Pakistani Daily Newspaper said:
LAHORE: MI5, the British intelligence agency, tried to bug Pakistan’s high commission in London. The spying operation, conducted through a building contractor turned MI5 agent, was apparently authorised by British Home Secretary David Blunkett.

The story first appeared in The Sunday Times, which did not mention the identity of the country whose high commission it was. But investigations by Daily Times reveal that the high commission was Pakistan’s. Confronted with this information, a senior official of the Foreign Ministry confirmed the news and told Daily Times that the government would take the matter up with the British Foreign Office. “The report published in the British press did not mention the Pakistani High Commission by name, but we know it is our high commission. We are taking up the matter with the British Foreign Office through our high commission,” he said.

According to the The Sunday Times, MI5 infiltrated the embassy, stole codes used by embassy staff to send secret messages, and planned to plant listening devices and remove sensitive documents. The agent who started the operation quit before the extensive bugging planned could be carried out and confessed his role to the embassy.

The spying operation was run under cover of restoration work that took place at the high commission in Lowndes Square in central London last year. One of the bidders for the contract to restore the dilapidated high commission building noted he had easy access to document archives in the building including some folders marked ‘confidential’.

He tried to contact MI5, but encountering some difficulty at first, got in touch with the Central Intelligence Agency, who got him in touch with Scotland Yard’s anti-terrorist branch. He eventually got an MI5 handler, the codename ‘Notation’, and a salary. Notation was given the task of using his position as contractor to get detailed information about the high commission’s layout, including the offices of the military, air and naval attaches, which MI5 planned to bug. He managed to get an agent into the building disguised as a surveyor checking whether the building had any dangerous materials. The “surveyor” got detailed information of the building’s layout, including diplomatic offices, and even managed to photograph documents in several filing cabinets that were open.

Some of the restoration work was on the top floor, which housed a cipher machine used by diplomats to send home confidential messages. Notation got three other MI5 agents disguised as repairmen into the building to move the machine, whose secret codes they copied from a post-it note on the wall. They also planned to “accidentally” break the machine so they could take it in for repair work and get it bugged. A similar “repair” job was envisaged for the telephone switchboard. MI5 also intended to steal all the visa applications gathering dust in the high commission basement. Notation would convince high commission staff he could get the sensitive documents destroyed by a reputable company and then turned into pulp, for which the high commission would get paid, when the documents would actually end up at the MI5 offices.

However, the operation broke down after Notation quit. He was paid tens of thousands of pounds and told MI5 would never work with him again. Notation later wrote a letter to a British government official, forwarding copies to the American and Pakistani embassies, exposing the whole affair and saying MI5 ran the operation ineptly. He claimed the bungling included an MI5 employee going into the high commission using two different identities, an MI5 officer meeting him in the street while still wearing her identity badge, and another taking notes in public in a police notebook.

He said he quit the operation because he felt his cover could easily be blown and his life was in danger. He claimed that when he voiced his concerns to his handler, he was reassured that authorisation for the operation came from the top level, and warrants had been signed by British Home Secretary David Blunkett.
Oh deary deary me! 8O
 
#2
HA HA HA!!!

Jolly good, have to keep an eye on the old colonies after all don't you :wink:

whose secret codes they copied from a post-it note on the wall
Good drills boys 8O



He claimed the bungling included an MI5 employee going into the high commission using two different identities, an MI5 officer meeting him in the street while still wearing her identity badge, and another taking notes in public in a police notebook.
Pretty much par for the course these days then. :twisted:
 
#4
whose secret codes they copied from a post-it note on the wall
That is so fcuking funny and true to life you wouldn't believe it!!!

The agent who started the operation quit before the extensive bugging planned could be carried out and confessed his role to the embassy.
No commitment these chaps!

Oh for the good old days when he'd have been found floating face down in the Thames!
 

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