big brass knocker

#1
Right pay attention
I know how to clean brasses army style, buts thats no use as I have this big ornate knocker that the wife keeps going on at me to clean
now a yellow duster and brasso is no good, is there such a thing as a liquid dip I could make for soaking brass in?
 
#2
You know, I googled Brass Dip, and to my surprise, it answered your very question
 
#3
You are in the perfect place to ask about that, there are dozens of Brasso drinkers on here. Maybe a jug of their piddle would strip it for you
 
#6
Solvol Autosol chrome cleaner and cotton buds gets the thick off. Then the usual elbow grease and duraglit. Once shiny enough for the queen of your heart, varnish the bugger.
 
#7
Check if it is lacquered or not. Sometimes brass door furniture is lacquered but the weather breaks it down and the brass becomes tarnished underneath the remaining lacquer. If it has any old lacquer on it then it's best to just remove it before trying to polish the thing.

If the door knocker is in some way special, you could gold plate it.
 

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#13
Cillit Bang is pretty good for this sort of thing.

Spray on, gentle scrub with a Brillo pad. Jobs a good’n.
 
#14
Solvol Autosol chrome cleaner and cotton buds gets the thick off. Then the usual elbow grease and duraglit. Once shiny enough for the queen of your heart, varnish the bugger.
You varnished her?8-O:shock:
 
#15
Right pay attention
I know how to clean brasses army style, buts thats no use as I have this big ornate knocker that the wife keeps going on at me to clean
now a yellow duster and brasso is no good, is there such a thing as a liquid dip I could make for soaking brass in?

Yellow pages, a polishing and buffing specialist, I used one when her indoors insisted on getting our brass nick nacks that adorn the fireplace polished up. some were sealed with a hard clear lacquer, which is nigh impossible to remove by hand. I might add that these items were on the large size.... That was then, this is now, I bought a polishing wheel attachment to fit to my two head bench mounted grinding wheel in my shed-workshop, you remove one wheel, and fit the boss on which you attach the compacted cotton polishing wheel, with it came a solid bar of polishing compound. .....If you are local to me, West-mids. PM me.
 
#16
It's actually quite a good robust old piece and came from a reclamation yard ,
so not anodised or plated, theres quite a lot of detail to it so brasso is a no go owing to the white residue.
I was hoping somebody had some sort of recipe that could be concocted from under the sink chemicals.
 
#17
Yellow pages, a polishing and buffing specialist, I used one when her indoors insisted on getting our brass nick nacks that adorn the fireplace polished up. some were sealed with a hard clear lacquer, which is nigh impossible to remove by hand. I might add that these items were on the large size.... That was then, this is now, I bought a polishing wheel attachment to fit to my two head bench mounted grinding wheel in my shed-workshop, you remove one wheel, and fit the boss on which you attach the compacted cotton polishing wheel, with it came a solid bar of polishing compound. .....If you are local to me, West-mids. PM me.
I believe thats called a linishing wheel, I have a bench grinder so I may go down that route. cheers.
 
#18
It's actually quite a good robust old piece and came from a reclamation yard ,
so not anodised or plated, theres quite a lot of detail to it so brasso is a no go owing to the white residue.
I was hoping somebody had some sort of recipe that could be concocted from under the sink chemicals.


Do not be too eager to use household chemicals, I made that mistake, and turned some brass pieces black, Brasso is OK for propriety pieces purchased from your local DIY store, big chunky older maybe antique pieces have a slightly different copper content, and need to be treated with respect. I have been polishing brass for many years, and it takes a lot of patience and a certain amount of skill to do a professional job.
 
#19
I believe thats called a linishing wheel, I have a bench grinder so I may go down that route. cheers.

I beg to differ. A linisheing wheel is abrasive, and is used to remove rust and general clag from steel & iron items. The polisheing and finisheing wheel, and atachments can be obtained from Machine Mart, from memory, about £30 appx.
 
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