Beyond comprehension - Courting insanity.

#1
Fresh Iraq violence claims 135 lives


New violence in Iraq has claimed the lives of more than 135 people, the country's police force has said.

Iraq's security services said that they had found at least 100 bodies dumped in the towns of Baqouba and around Baghdad on Sunday.

Police said that 75 bodies were found dumped behind a regional electrical company in Baqouba, northeast of Baghdad, and 25 others found scattered throughout the capital.

It was not clear when the victims, believed to be mostly men, were killed.

Baqouba, a mixed Sunni-Shia town, around 35 miles north of Baghdad has been the scene of some of heaviest fighting between Iraq's rival sects.

Some observers believe that more than 100,000 people have died in the Iraqi civil war that began after the US overthrew Saddam Hussein's mainly Sunni government in 2003.
http://english.aljazeera.net/NR/exeres/B98DD62A-CC80-46EC-982F-31BE9853E723.htm

It's just insane. still, at least the Police got to the scene of the crimes just quick enough to count the bodies. C****.

More articles extolling the virtues of the Iraqi old Bill here

http://www.upi.com/SecurityTerrorism/view.php?StoryID=20061103-042216-7235r

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/main.jhtml?xml=/news/2006/03/27/wirq27.xml

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2006/07/09/insurgent-infiltration-b_n_24671.html
 
#4
The worrying thing is the scale of the killings. 135 in Baquba alone on one weekend.

Just think what sort of infrastructure is needed to carry out such a large operation. It's not as if that sort of number of tooled up individuals could stay under the radar for very long, so how can they continue to get away with it?

There is more to this than meets the eye...
 
#5
Just think what sort of infrastructure is needed to carry out such a large operation. It's not as if that sort of number of tooled up individuals could stay under the radar for very long, so how can they continue to get away with it?
By putting on Police uniform and driving round in Police cars?

No worse than a bad day in pre-guiliani New York.
Oh that's all right then.
 
#6
PartTimePongo said:
Just think what sort of infrastructure is needed to carry out such a large operation. It's not as if that sort of number of tooled up individuals could stay under the radar for very long, so how can they continue to get away with it?
By putting on Police uniform and driving round in Police cars?

Ok, but who's giving them access to the gear? Someone on the inside must be helping them, or at least turning a blind eye to their activities. :?

If it continues, people will lose all trust in the police service and arm themselves a la vigilante. Could lead to some real nasty 'incidents'.
 
#7
The BBC was reporting last night that some 100,000 people flee Iraq every month.

It strikes me that many recent deaths, particularly in light of numbers, are starting to resemble genocide on the part of Sunni and Shia factions.
 
#8
No Agent Smith, I am saying there are Police Officers and members of the security services involved, either directly , or allowing this to happen.
 
B

benjaminw1

Guest
#9
Agent_Smith said:
PartTimePongo said:
Just think what sort of infrastructure is needed to carry out such a large operation. It's not as if that sort of number of tooled up individuals could stay under the radar for very long, so how can they continue to get away with it?
By putting on Police uniform and driving round in Police cars?

Ok, but who's giving them access to the gear? Someone on the inside must be helping them, or at least turning a blind eye to their activities. :?

If it continues, people will lose all trust in the police service and arm themselves a la vigilante. Could lead to some real nasty 'incidents'.
I would imagine a number of them are issued with it...
 
#10
PartTimePongo said:
No Agent Smith, I am saying there are Police Officers and members of the security services involved, either directly , or allowing this to happen.
That's what i was tyrying to say.

For attrocities of this size to happen regularly, there has to be some form of instituionalised corruption allowing it to happen. Again, it links back to the distrust of the police (see Brits rescue two SAS men from basrah jail).
 
#11
There was a documentary on tv about this last week. In the rush to get as many Iraqis into uniform as quickly as possible following the disbandment of the old Ba'athist army/police, militiamen were recruited wholesale with hardly any vetting. The way the Iraqi 'government' is 'organised' is that each faction tends to get its own ministry, with its own private army. So for example the Badr Brigades get the 'Housing' Ministry, which gets them access to oil/aid money and the Infrastructute Protection Force (or whatever it's called), which is now composed mainly of Badr militiamen.
 
#12
The militia seem to be increasing in their audacity...

Gunmen seize 100 at Iraq ministry

Gunmen in military-style uniforms have kidnapped more than 100 men from a research institute belonging to Iraq's higher education ministry.

A ministry spokeswoman said the gunmen arrived in new pick-up vehicles and stormed the ministry's Research Directorate in central Baghdad.

They ordered women into one room and seized the men, including employees, guards and visitors to the building.

Academics and researchers have been frequent targets of violence in Iraq.

Correspondents say many Iraqis believe mass kidnappings like this latest incident are committed by members of the Shia Muslim-dominated security forces or take place with their collusion...

...

a civil servant who said he was returning to the building at the time of the abduction, described gunmen lining up the male staff in the car park and checking their identity cards.

"They picked only the Sunni employees. They even took the man who was just delivering tea," said the eyewitness in an interview with Reuters news agency.

"They gathered them all in the pick-ups. At the same time, I saw two police patrols watching, doing nothing," he said.
Beeb
 
#13
The situation is now beyond the serious end of the ethnic cleansing scale, whole areas are being cleansed of Sunni or Shia. There is no central control, the police are often just extensions of strong-arm 'warlords' and often are the people committing these crimes. I cant see an end to it, is there a solution?

Only when everybody has left or is dead (an opposing area), will they stop killing them...

Alternatively we could put a dictator in control, and give him a free hand in ruling the place with a rod of iron.....

Ratcatcher
 
#14
Ratcatcher, supremely ironic and true at the same time. This war has led to a strategic and human disaster in the region. You forgot to add that Iran and Syria will end up being the beneficiaries after the West has inadvertently fought a war costing billions on their (mainly Iranian) behalf. A staggeringly inept decision, the axis of evil must be laughing over their cornflakes. You really could not make it up. They are now being courted by our very own Prime Minister, cap in hand.

Intelligence services? Maybe they should be renamed, anyone have any ideas?

Supply of oil in the fuure, oh that is largely under control of (a nuclear?)Iran, err, we didn't really intend that.....
 
#15
Well what do you know.....

Iraq hostages 'freed by police'

Iraq hostages 'freed by police'

Iraq's police apparently found the hostages across Baghdad
All of the hostages seized in a raid by gunmen on a Baghdad higher education facility have been released, Iraqi officials say.
A government spokesman told the BBC that the hostages were freed in a number of police raids across the city.

Gunmen dressed in uniforms similar to those worn by Iraqi police abducted dozens of people.

Five top officers were later held - including the police chief of Karrada district where the abductions occurred.

About 20 of the abductees had been released earlier on Tuesday evening.

The rest of the hostages were said to have been freed shortly before midnight in Baghdad (2100 GMT), according to presidential security adviser Wafiq al-Sammarai.

Daylight raid

Initial estimates had suggested that more than 100 people had been seized, but that was later revised down throughout the day.

Reports said that there were about 40 still in captivity when the police operation set them free.

Some of the men released earlier in the evening said they had not been taken far, and had certainly not left Baghdad.

They were seized by at least 20 gunmen who posed as interior ministry police to seal off the street and gain entry to the higher education ministry.

They wore uniforms recently issued to officers which were thought to be difficult to copy.
http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/world/middle_east/6149110.stm

Freed by Police? Well let's face it, they knew where they were because they'd lifted them in the first place.
 
#16
Alot of the bodies are Sunni's killed by shia death squads, who often are members of various government security units. Going unnoticed is the flight of Sunni's out of Iraq. Essentially a form of ethnic cleansing is being practiced by the shia. The government is either incapable of stopping the killing or doesnt want to.
 
#17
AndyPipkin said:
There was a documentary on tv about this last week. In the rush to get as many Iraqis into uniform as quickly as possible following the disbandment of the old Ba'athist army/police, militiamen were recruited wholesale with hardly any vetting. The way the Iraqi 'government' is 'organised' is that each faction tends to get its own ministry, with its own private army. So for example the Badr Brigades get the 'Housing' Ministry, which gets them access to oil/aid money and the Infrastructute Protection Force (or whatever it's called), which is now composed mainly of Badr militiamen.
Clearly the security apparatus contains undesirables willing to abuse their office, but is this a deliberate policy of entryism on the part of the militias?

I ask this given the number of times queues of recruits etc have been targetted. Is this one batch trying to wipe out another and tilt the internal police balance in their favour?

If it is entryism, I'd say their best strategy is to lie low: surely they can see the US scrabbling for an exit strategy? If so, surely they can best expedite things by lying low and waiting?

If the current situation represents any form of lying low, and organised entryism has taken place, it really does raise Rwandan scale worries about a post-Allied withdrawal Iraq...
 
#18
Iraq PM calls for raiders' arrest

Iraqi Prime Minister Nouri Maliki has called for the immediate arrest of those behind a mass kidnapping from a government building in Baghdad.
The authorities say about 40 people taken from the higher education ministry building by gunmen in interior ministry uniforms have been released.

Police say they are attempting to free more, but there are conflicting reports of how many are still being held.

......................

Mr Maliki said the militants behind the daylight raid were "worse than extremists", and added: "What happened was not terrorism, rather it was due to dispute and conflict between militias from one side or another."

He went on to demand the release the remaining captives.

He was speaking at Baghdad university during a visit to calm professors and students.
http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/world/middle_east/6149890.stm



Words fail me. Oh it wasn't terrorism, it was just a dispute? Just how bent are things in the Iraqi Government?

What this needs, is a dyed in the wool baby eating ginger-haired b*stard like oh I don't know.....Ibrahim al-Douri.
 
#19
Slightly off-thread, but the same is true in the 'Stan. Grab a group of like-minded Talib chums (or thieves, if you're not into the politics/religion vibe), pop down the souk and get yourselves kitted up in police clobber, grab your AK, hop into the back of a Mitsubishi pick up and go and visit Kabul.

Set up a bogus checkpoint and rob, kill or capture as many Western infidels as you like as they cab it back from the bar at midnight pissed as farts.

I never once saw a copper in Kabul with ID and at night there are checkpoints all over the place away from the big embassies and compounds.

They never seemed to bother stopping locals and they didn't seem to be equipped with radios - or badges - or ID of any kind.

Go closer to the big Western compounds and you'll see proper, well trained coppers. You can tell them by their MP5s - the Boxheads do most of the training.

Once you're away from Wazir Akbar Khan, it's bandit country
 

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