Best weapons / optimum calibres

I hit you in the chest at 2,100fps or 2,400fps, and the effect will be much the same - dead.
Err, not quite: The current NATO round has a tendency for the bullet to tumble on impact when its velocity is over 2,500fps, hence my reference to the 120-200m zone.
Under that, it tends to pencil through, so unless it hits the heart or arteries what you have is a dangerous but not necessarily fatal wound.
 
Lose 100fps going to a 14" barrel from a 16"
Gain 300fps going to 20" barrel from a 16"

That extra 400fps has a direct bearing on range, penetration and accuracy
Longer barrels are also easier on your lug holes if you cant wear defenders .
 
At the risk of being "At Home" to Mr Thicky at the moment I am left wondering the validity of applying one set of data from a specific round, fired from specific barrels, with specific twist and so forth is genuinely applicable to all other calibres and barrels.
Seems to me that there are an awful lot of variables that need to be factored in - fair enough as a (very) general rule of thumb though I suppose.
 

rampant

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
At the risk of being "At Home" to Mr Thicky at the moment I am left wondering the validity of applying one set of data from a specific round, fired from specific barrels, with specific twist and so forth is genuinely applicable to all other calibres and barrels.
Seems to me that there are an awful lot of variables that need to be factored in - fair enough as a (very) general rule of thumb though I suppose.
No you're not
 

ugly

LE
Moderator
I hit you in the chest at 2,100fps or 2,400fps, and the effect will be much the same - dead.
Assuming you can actually hit him!
 
Brown Bess-Gents further to posts on page 95 I found an interesting video on Utube from the " 95th Rifle re-enactment group in Australia "Green Cockade 2009" were they do some interesting tests with the BB which turns out to surprisingly accurate at 100 yards,but they mentioned using 6 drams of powder which is just under the 7 drams mine is UK proofed to.Sore shoulders I would imagine afterwards
 
Assuming you can actually hit him!
a good point.
try spotting a bloke who has half decent concealment skills at 400m. Even more difficult if the blighter is a half decent shot, coz doing a meerkat is really not tempting.
 

ugly

LE
Moderator
A few of us on here and in other places have been playing around with various calibres including shortening existing cases and creating new ones. Its been fun but most of it is fairly repetitive and ends up in the same place. It is however fun!
 
A few of us on here and in other places have been playing around with various calibres including shortening existing cases and creating new ones. Its been fun but most of it is fairly repetitive and ends up in the same place. It is however fun!
It's interesting to see various militaries testing new cartridges too & they often end up with something that look similar to the .280 British.
 

ugly

LE
Moderator
6.5 Creedmoor is the way ahead 6.5mm Creedmoor
No argument for 1000 yard stuff.

Shooting Illustrated: The two initial Hornady loads are a 147-grain ELD Match bullet at 2,910 fps and a 143-grain ELD-X bullet at 2,960 fps. With a 100-yard zero, drop at 1,000 yards will only be about 24.5 MOA. And, bullets will impact in less than 1.40 seconds, with a retained velocity of more than 1,600 fps. The 6.5 PRC remains supersonic beyond 1,300 yards.

Cartridge weight is going to be a big problem with that idea. I can't find the figures for the weight of a complete 6.5 Creedmoor cartridge, but what I can find doesn't seem to put it far short of a 7.62x51mm NATO. That probably makes it a non-starter.
Read an article (don't ask where) recently where the writer compared 7.62mm (.308) to 6.5 Creedmoor - as a cheap sniping option compared to the heavy duty .338's and .50 cal's of this world. His comparison included price, range, usability and the 6.5 came out on top as it offered accuracy in excess of 1000 yards in the right hands.

@terminal , I can't find a gross cartridge weight either.


300 AAC Blackout is gaining popularity as a round. Even the MoD has bought a bucket load:

http://ted.europa.eu/TED/notice/udl?uri=TED:NOTICE:273296-2017:TEXT:EN:HTML

.300 AAC Blackout - Wikipedia

300 AAC Blackout as it is today was put together by AAC to go with the suppressors they were selling to US SOCOM. The company's founder Kevin Brittingham was very much behind the project and has moved on to a further ammunition project:

Kevin Brittingham - The Original Honey Badger | RECOIL

But, what do I know.
 
It's really nothing but a fatter 6mm creed Moor which is really a 6mm navy Lee, and etc ad infinitum
Except it is proving to be the most accurate production long range round available , easily out classing the 7.62x51 as a sniper round .
The 6.5 Creedmoor is actually based on the .30TC which only came out in 2007.
 
(...) Read an article (don't ask where) recently where the writer compared 7.62mm (.308) to 6.5 Creedmoor - as a cheap sniping option compared to the heavy duty .338's and .50 cal's of this world. His comparison included price, range, usability and the 6.5 came out on top as it offered accuracy in excess of 1000 yards in the right hands.
There's a difference between a special round for sniping and standard service weapon ammunition.

(...) 300 AAC Blackout is gaining popularity as a round. Even the MoD has bought a bucket load (...)
Isn't that the round where people were blowing up their rifles by somehow chambering it in 5.56mm rifles?
https://www.quora.com/Can-I-shoot-a...ce=google_rich_qa&utm_campaign=google_rich_qa





 
Brown Bess-Gents further to posts on page 95 I found an interesting video on Utube from the " 95th Rifle re-enactment group in Australia "Green Cockade 2009" were they do some interesting tests with the BB which turns out to surprisingly accurate at 100 yards,but they mentioned using 6 drams of powder which is just under the 7 drams mine is UK proofed to.Sore shoulders I would imagine afterwards
For smoothbore guns, with all else being equal, accuracy = velocity..

It was generally conceded that the French Charleville musket in .69 was more accurate than the .75 Brown Bess.. (not by much though..) That said, English powder was more powerful and consistent than French. It was also said that the Bess barrel would bend as it heated up as it was pinned to the stock, whereas the Charleville barrel was free to move in its barrel bands..! It is true that the Americans chose to copy the French design rather than the English..

On the other hand, the heavier Bess ball would deliver more energy..

Frankly I doubt if either made that much difference.. Muskets were favoured because of their robustness, cost and reload speed over accuracy..
 

ugly

LE
Moderator
The 6.5 Creedmoor is actually based on the .30TC which only came out in 2007.
Agreed but the concept is nothing new, a shorter 6.5 in a slightly newish case, the case by the way is new but not in concept, its reasonably close to quite a few others. Its almost as if the cousins are doing almost anything not to reduce case length if they can!
 

ugly

LE
Moderator
There's a difference between a special round for sniping and standard service weapon ammunition.


Isn't that the round where people were blowing up their rifles by somehow chambering it in 5.56mm rifles?
https://www.quora.com/Can-I-shoot-a...ce=google_rich_qa&utm_campaign=google_rich_qa





That's what happens when you make rifles out of alloys. The 6.5 Arisaka was built of superior steel and a test was done where rechambering to 30-06 hadn't blown it up so by overloading the only managed to stress it to the point where the bolt handle broke on opening but the bore was still clear!
 

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