Best weapons for FIBUA we should have... but dont

Minions, heavily armed minions, thousands of them.
Job jobbed.
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Some thoughts, accumulation of articles, talks about the invasion of Lebanon, Grozny etc. Plus some anecdotes:
I remember how, in Aden in 1965, a rather inventive Arab tied some fish hooks on to a No 36 grenade in an attempt to get it to catch on to the wire mesh that we had covering the backs of our Bedford lorries. That the armed grenade caught on his shirt and remained there, despite his frantic efforts, in no way diminishes the quality of his original thought!
We were out there then, I was around 7 years old. The old man once told me that the gollies arab terrorist gentlemen who had jobs on camp used to scrape their finger nails over PE getting it under their nails. Once inside they would then clean it from under their nails and accumulate enough over time through joint effort to construct a device. I used to wonder how they selected the unfortunate who had to smuggle the det in by sticking it up his jacksy.
 

Poppycock

Swinger
These always struck me (not literally) as being pretty effective, especially on armoured vehicles with loose hatches
petrol bomb.jpg
 
Not a weapon, a practical tool, but one that is impractical to lug around.

I joined as a junior leader in 1972. Fibua lessons in the class room all included the described use of rope and grapnel, but never saw one.
Loads of Fibua on exercise while at Oswestry.... never saw a rope and grapnel.
Passed into Man Service, went to Pirbright, had the exact same Fibua lessons and exercises before joining my battalion, and again, never saw a single rope and grapnel.
1997, now TAVR RMP, Fibua training at Longmoor..... rope and grapnel for everyone (all to be returned at Endex).
Heavy, bulky.... flocked if I'm lugging that around for WW3!

NSN 1095-01-412-4150:
LAUNCHED GRAPNEL HOOK (LGH)
(NSN 1095014124150 / NIIN 014124150)



Fires from any NATO 22mm flash hider equipped rifle/carbine using Live or blank cartridge
 
The Israeli developed method is better in FIBUA, they 'tunnel'. I read a paper on it a year or so ago written by either a Brit or US officer, I forget. The approach is to treat open spaces as dangerous killing grounds, they therefore avoid them by moving through interiors of structures wherever possible. That does not mean going in the front door and out of the back door. If there is a row of attached structures they will move through the structures making mansized holes as they need to in order to pass from one to the next and therefore minimising their exposure outside of cover/concealment.
Used in WW2 by the UK and US in German Cities like Cologne and Aachen. and as I was taught at Ft Campbell KY in 1982. Its NOT a new concept, but rather maybe one forgotten by us.
 
Used in WW2 by the UK and US in German Cities like Cologne and Aachen. and as I was taught at Ft Campbell KY in 1982. Its NOT a new concept, but rather maybe one forgotten by us.
Forgotten and rediscovered like a few things over the last decade I would think. NATO Warfare evolved to fighting Ivan on the European plain shuffling armor and infantry around like chess pieces. For the Israelis it involved fighting similar battles in desert landscapes. Then the Israelis were hit with urban warfare in densely packed environments so I can easily imagine some clever old retired Israeli probably mentioning and describing it to one of their children, or grandchildren who were complaining of the problem over family Sunday lunch.

I had a similar experience with a box head mate who was tasked with finding a waterproof material with the properties of cotton. Being an old fart I know that before goretex there was ventile ..... apparently the sproggy captains and majors in the joint NATO group had never heard of it.

Amazing how quickly stuff is forgotten.
 
Used in WW2 by the UK and US in German Cities like Cologne and Aachen. and as I was taught at Ft Campbell KY in 1982. Its NOT a new concept, but rather maybe one forgotten by us.
Btw, I have problems imagining it being used in cologne. I have seen the post blanket bombing aerial and ground photos of cologne. The only building left standing in the city by bombers was the cathedral - it was deliberately missed. Fighting through the ruins I can see, but not through buildings.
 

Cutaway

LE
Kit Reviewer
Perhaps the best weapon for urban use, which we don't have , would be large calibre (300mm or up) rocket launched artillery, and lots of it with the will to use it. Why fight room by room (or cellar by cellar) when you can flatten the town in a day or so, from umpteen km away, then cordon it off and wait for surrender?
According to various history books the Germans attempted a similar** approach to Assaulting Stalingrad only to discover the myriad of collapsed buildings and shattered roads provided excellent cover for soviet units and impeded the German advance.

Equally Russian firepower didn't obliterate the Germans in round 2 -

Why flatten the town if you plan to just starve it out ? - That just seems to expend munitions ad create lots of work later - is it really likely to speed up the surrender?

**albeit bombing rather than rocketing the crap out of it.
 
20mm Neopup. AP and HE rounds. Shoot through walls and blow the doors off. What's not to like?



 

Cutaway

LE
Kit Reviewer
Which is a modern version of a thing called the petard developed in the 16th century.
Except a petard used neither a shaped charge nor high explosive.
 
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That the armed grenade caught on his shirt and remained there,
Was it not a self-removing grenade? After around 7 seconds.:)

Reminds me of the story, not sure how true it is, about puzzled occupants of MQs finding live armed grenades in their gardens. Apparently Abdul was paid a fiver to lob a grenade into the garden, said and done. Either nobody told him to pull the pin first or Abdul just couldn't be bothered.
Apparently the same trick was used in the Falklands when clearing buildings. Due to the fact that grenades were in short supply every other grenade was lobbed in plus pin. If there were Argies on the receiving end they exited PDFQ, if nobody was in the room the grenade could be retrieved anyway. Once again not sure how true this is, but it sounds good.
 
Used in WW2 by the UK and US in German Cities like Cologne and Aachen. and as I was taught at Ft Campbell KY in 1982. Its NOT a new concept, but rather maybe one forgotten by us.
Called Mouseholing when I was being taught it.
 

chrisg46

LE
Book Reviewer
Not a weapon, a practical tool, but one that is impractical to lug around.

I joined as a junior leader in 1972. Fibua lessons in the class room all included the described use of rope and grapnel, but never saw one.
Loads of Fibua on exercise while at Oswestry.... never saw a rope and grapnel.
Passed into Man Service, went to Pirbright, had the exact same Fibua lessons and exercises before joining my battalion, and again, never saw a single rope and grapnel.
1997, now TAVR RMP, Fibua training at Longmoor..... rope and grapnel for everyone (all to be returned at Endex).
Heavy, bulky.... flocked if I'm lugging that around for WW3
a slight diversion - one of the funniest methods I have seen is for a section of blokes running full pelt at a building, holding a ladder as if a battering ram. At the last second, the first two drop the end to the ground and anchor it while the rest push it upright - the skinniest runt of the section holds on to the end for grim death as he is lifted to the level of the window and scampers inside!
Very effective, as long as you get the angle or the height right...
 
NSN 1095-01-412-4150:
LAUNCHED GRAPNEL HOOK (LGH)
(NSN 1095014124150 / NIIN 014124150)



Fires from any NATO 22mm flash hider equipped rifle/carbine using Live or blank cartridge
And no doubt polished lovingly and stored away under lock and key by the Q Bloke in the same vault where he kept the new sleeping bags. :D
 
My turn at FIBUA was in the mid 90s. We were given grapnels, but told to use ladders (provided) after the grapnel was in place, due to one of the hooks failing under load a few months before and the unlucky assaulter being crippled in the fall. The grapnels had WW2 era dates on them, so they must have been pretty knackered by the 90s.
Begs the question, where did the ladders come from.

Same story with mousehole charges, where do you get the two lengths of stick and the means to securely tie them together in the required 'X' shape?

I take it that the old 'Army Kinema Corps' training film for FIBUA using the Welsh Guards (circa 1943), though excellent, has been replaced?
 

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