Best Mountain Bike For Under £500 ?

#1
As I get older and my knees say stop running and slow down I`m considering buying a mountain bike , I know SFA about them so let me know what to go for ? £500 budget.Second hand no problem.

PS I want suspension.
 
#2
It depends what type of riding you want to do with it.

Is it local commuting?
Riding Cross Country trails?
Riding for fitness on roads?
 
#7
I ride to work everyday on road and track.

By using a bike with 29inch/700 wheels and no suspension I knocked loads of time off. Have a look at hybrids and cyclocross.

It's all about tastes but if you're not going to the mountains do you need a mountain bike?

Have a butcher's on e bay. The best makes have been listed by another poster. If you're smart you'll get a high spec bike for £500, but it won't be this year's model.
 
#10
Riding cross country / asphalt for fitness.
It might be worth considering a 'hardtail' bike.
I.e. Front fork suspension, but no suspension on the back.

This will give you better traction on asphalt as you're not wasting energy with the bike bouncing. Although most full suspension bikes have adjustable suspension on the rear spring (you will unlikely get an air suspension for the money), which means you can tighten it up or loosen it off depending on your ride surface. And the front forks suspension will take most of the impact when riding downhill on rough surface. That'll give your wrists and elbows some relief.

Good makes to look out for are Trek, Kona, Specialized, Cannondale, and even the old BMX favourite Mongoose.
 
#11
You'll struggle to find a decent full-susser new for £500- look for a used Specialized Stumpjumper, some think they're a bit vanilla but they're usually pretty well specced and they work. If you go for a hardtail your budget is seen as the minimum you'll pay for a serious bike and the magazines run annual 'dirty dozen' tests of machines at this price point; have a gander at the MBR (Mountain Bike Rider) and What Mountain Bike magazines' websites.
 
#14
It might be worth considering a 'hardtail' bike.
I.e. Front fork suspension, but no suspension on the back.

This will give you better traction on asphalt as you're not wasting energy with the bike bouncing. Although most full suspension bikes have adjustable suspension on the rear spring (you will unlikely get an air suspension for the money), which means you can tighten it up or loosen it off depending on your ride surface. And the front forks suspension will take most of the impact when riding downhill on rough surface. That'll give your wrists and elbows some relief.

Good makes to look out for are Trek, Kona, Specialized, Cannondale, and even the old BMX favourite Mongoose.
I dont want to fcuk my back up again so suspension seems logical , I used to ride hard tail choppers in my younger days , look good but bloody uncomfortable.
 
R

renamed_user

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#16
Having bought new bikes its only when you meet an "anorak" that you realise you need tyres that are good for off road and road use. You can get tyres that are also puncture resistant. Wider pedals helps. Front suspension that can be locked or unlocked depending on the terrain. My anorak mate has a full suspension bike that weighs considerably less than my 3 year old Marin bobcat. However his frame alone was over a £1000.
Be weary of buying bikes on line, when I did the H4H 2009 ride through France there was a chubby ex sigs lad who had bought a mountain bike on line, it was clearly too small for him and looked a little ridiculose especially as he wore lycra. Have also realised that independant bike shops will discount very heavily old stock if you can gamble on waiting.
 
#17
Definately a hybrid or a 29er then. You'll have more room to move around and fit the bike better.
Not necessarily. Hybrids don't do either road or off-road very well. I see very few hybrids on mtb trails in the woods but loads of mtbs on the road. As for tyres, you can even get studded ones for riding on icy roads. You can move around a normal mtb just as well. 29ers just have bigger wheels. Plenty of big blokes ride 26" wheeled mtbs, frames may be 19", 21" . Main thing is frame size and reach. Try a few and see what feels right.
Don't go for dual-suspension. Hard tails are best at this price point. In the early 90s we rode the same trails with no suspension, just stood up in the bouncy bits.
 
#18
Not necessarily. Hybrids don't do either road or off-road very well. I see very few hybrids on mtb trails in the woods but loads of mtbs on the road. As for tyres, you can even get studded ones for riding on icy roads. You can move around a normal mtb just as well. 29ers just have bigger wheels. Plenty of big blokes ride 26" wheeled mtbs, frames may be 19", 21" . Main thing is frame size and reach. Try a few and see what feels right.
Don't go for dual-suspension. Hard tails are best at this price point. In the early 90s we rode the same trails with no suspension, just stood up in the bouncy bits.
So what frame / wheel size is best for me ? 1.92 and 96kg.
 
#19
Mate go to a decent cycle shop, speak to the staff and get one fitted to you. They can make sure you are getting the right size and the right bike for your needs, especially if you have a dodgy back, if you are near Planet X in Sheffield they do test rides and have some crackers, bit more than £500 though!. Don't forget especially with cycles you get what you pay for and if you intend to use it a lot you need the best you can afford, gears cassette, brakes etc etc. Boardman do some decent bikes, got my Mrs a Boardman Hybrid which she uses for commuting it really is a nice bike, well made and good quality kit on it. Good luck.
 

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