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Best Leatherman?

I bought a Wave recently and made it UK street legal by using a Dremel to remove the locking lugs on both main blades. I don't need a locking blade, and the legislation on the Gov.uk web site is quite clear about knives, so I've removed the problem.

On some forums there is comment about devaluing the tool by doing this mod, but I'm not intending to sell it!
 
They are night and day better virtually replaced my axe.
That leatherman PST likely illegal on over 2.5" rules
 
It's annoying I carried a Swiss army knife most of my life never stabbed anyone except myself. Very careful about the leatherman now. Accidenly took had it in pocket for London eye and was surprised to be asked about blades, said no as I thought if I told the truth it would cause more trouble. If I got in bother for carrying a leatherman I loose the bang stick ticket.
 
Absolutely this. You can carry a 'folding pocket knife' with a blade less than 3 inches long without good reason or lawful authority. note that locking blades are illegal irrespective of length.
Interesting, my rescue knife for kayaking, folding, blade about 2.5 inches long, locking, is made and sold in the UK. Normally carried in my buoyancy aid pocket, I.e where I can get at it with either hand and pull the blade open with my teeth to cut through the rescue ripe I an entangled with. That being the point.

Would my 7 inch folding pruning saw, also carried when paddling, but actually in the front of my boat (Velcro strapped to the pillar between my legs) for releasing people trapped in trees, or just clearing fallen trees, also fall foul of this I wonder...
 
You see what I mean.
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OneTenner

LE
Book Reviewer
I think it all comes down to purpose / reason for carrying in public.
I have a Bahco Laplander folding saw that I carry every time I take the dogs into the woods - reasoning is for clearing (legal) footpaths of fallen branches etc.
I have an ex. Mil. machete that I carry when in, or expect to be in dense woodland - reasoning is for clearing a path for progress across legally accessible land.
I have several fixed blade knives and axes that I carry on my person or in my bergen (not all at the same time!) - reasoning is for fire starting / shelter building in a survival training environment.
I have a Gerber multi-tool, it was damn useful on deployments and a 'standard' accessory for most - reasoning is that it was a combination tool for unexpected circumstances and didn't have a specific purpose.

I have been questioned by the rozzers for the first three and my explanation accepted as legitimate and allowed on my way, the last one was required to be handed in to the RAF movers, signed for and passed to the loadie - who would 'secure' on the flight then hand back to me on arrival at the destination.
The flight was either a C17 / C130 and had various amounts of rifles, rounds & other munitions on the flight (in the case of the C130's, there was also an axe fixed to the airframe) within easy reach but 'protected' by being enclosed in a hessian sack and a hazard label.
 

PFGEN

GCM
Not at all, I've never liked the traditional billhooks/slashers - too heavy and never seem sharp enough. Those Fiskar tools look like a big improvement.

I liked it so much I've found out where I can get my hands on one of those long arm machetes (party isle at the local DIY).
 
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I think it all comes down to purpose / reason for carrying in public.
I have a Bahco Laplander folding saw that I carry every time I take the dogs into the woods - reasoning is for clearing (legal) footpaths of fallen branches etc.
I have an ex. Mil. machete that I carry when in, or expect to be in dense woodland - reasoning is for clearing a path for progress across legally accessible land.
I have several fixed blade knives and axes that I carry on my person or in my bergen (not all at the same time!) - reasoning is for fire starting / shelter building in a survival training environment.
I have a Gerber multi-tool, it was damn useful on deployments and a 'standard' accessory for most - reasoning is that it was a combination tool for unexpected circumstances and didn't have a specific purpose.

I have been questioned by the rozzers for the first three and my explanation accepted as legitimate and allowed on my way, the last one was required to be handed in to the RAF movers, signed for and passed to the loadie - who would 'secure' on the flight then hand back to me on arrival at the destination.
The flight was either a C17 / C130 and had various amounts of rifles, rounds & other munitions on the flight (in the case of the C130's, there was also an axe fixed to the airframe) within easy reach but 'protected' by being enclosed in a hessian sack and a hazard label.
A bit too reliant upon the subjective opinion of a copper. It sounds like you haven't come across one on a bad day yet.
 
Interesting, my rescue knife for kayaking, folding, blade about 2.5 inches long, locking, is made and sold in the UK. Normally carried in my buoyancy aid pocket, I.e where I can get at it with either hand and pull the blade open with my teeth to cut through the rescue ripe I an entangled with. That being the point.

Would my 7 inch folding pruning saw, also carried when paddling, but actually in the front of my boat (Velcro strapped to the pillar between my legs) for releasing people trapped in trees, or just clearing fallen trees, also fall foul of this I wonder...
I always carry a pruning saw and a short fixed blade knife on my buoyancy aid. The blade is square tipped so it won’t puncture anything if dropped and both are on bungy lanyards attached to the BA. I’ve never been asked about either, but I only wear the BA in the boat or on the bank, so technically within the law.
Leatherman make a rescue tool (Z-Rex or similar) which works on ropes, seat belts etc, ambidextrous, no unfolding required and works with freezing fingers.
 
I always carry a pruning saw and a short fixed blade knife on my buoyancy aid. The blade is square tipped so it won’t puncture anything if dropped and both are on bungy lanyards attached to the BA. I’ve never been asked about either, but I only wear the BA in the boat or on the bank, so technically within the law.
Leatherman make a rescue tool (Z-Rex or similar) which works on ropes, seat belts etc, ambidextrous, no unfolding required and works with freezing fingers.
Ah, a fellow paddler.

I was questioning the assertation about locking folders always being illegal...
 

kalliste

Clanker
If it's not going to be a surprise it might be worth asking him which one he'd like the best.
ETA Mine's a Gerber too, does anyone actually have a Leatherman Leatherman?
I have one that says on it, "Leatherman Super Tool Pat Pend" which I bought in the early 80s. I snapped the end off one of the things but it turned that into a bigger screwdriver bit. It's been great and at the time there was only the Leatherman. I bought it in CostCo with a sheath and Mini Maglite for £20 IRRC.
 
Ah, a fellow paddler.

I was questioning the assertation about locking folders always being illegal...
A locking blade is ‘legally’ a fixed blade (like a kitchen knife), as such, it can be carried with reasonable excuse, eg working with ropes on moving water, slicing bread on the river bank and gutting fish that you’ve caught.
 

OneTenner

LE
Book Reviewer
A bit too reliant upon the subjective opinion of a copper. It sounds like you haven't come across one on a bad day yet.
Most of the places I go to, the average copper wouldn't reach without considerable effort, most of the 'wildlife / rural protection' ones I've met are a bit more clued up and take a more considered view than the points-scoring townies.
That said, all the kit I mentioned is never 'on show' as such and I'd never carry it if it wasn't appropriate to what I was doing. I had a long chat with a couple of rural coppers a few years ago about what is seen as 'good reason', I think we all learned something that day.
 
A locking blade is ‘legally’ a fixed blade (like a kitchen knife), as such, it can be carried with reasonable excuse, eg working with ropes on moving water, slicing bread on the river bank and gutting fish that you’ve caught.
Kind of the point I was making, rather obtusely I admit.

It worries me the level of ignorance some coppers have about the law.

When I first started carrying a river knife (many years ago now), you couldn't get most of the ones we see today, so I got a small diving knife. Front was smooth, rear had a serrated edge. Perfect I thought.

Newcastle train station, random check by a copper, 45 minutes later and after his Sgt coming out I got on my train. With the knife still in sale packaging and dive shop carrier bag. But no apology.
 
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