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Bench press or press ups?

#3
Just think about it for a minute.

Press up limited by your own body weight.

Bench press limited by how strong you are (or get).

Now ask your self which one is best :wink:
 
#4
Press ups are a maintenance exercise, bench press is development!
 
#7
paveway_3 said:
Dont forget incline and decline bench press.That way you build up all of your chest .
A myth. 90% of the chest is made up of the pectoris major. One muscle! Forget the pec minor. Hitting it from a slightly different angle in the form of inclines and declines doesn't specifically work the upper or lower part of the chest any more then performing flat benching. In fact inclines involve the anterior delts more so less chest growth is achieved.
 
#8
Roger that,yet again I am speaking out of my arrse.Question for you german para bloke.Whats the best when benching,feet flat on the floor or legs bent with you feet resting on the bench ?Ive seen both done however I prefer the later saves aching my rugby worn lower back.
 
#9
It doesn't really matter too much what the lower body is doing TBH unless you are thinking of competing in strongman contests then the rules are feet flat on the floor.
 
#11
Fallschirmjager said:
paveway_3 said:
Dont forget incline and decline bench press.That way you build up all of your chest .
A myth. 90% of the chest is made up of the pectoris major. One muscle! Forget the pec minor. Hitting it from a slightly different angle in the form of inclines and declines doesn't specifically work the upper or lower part of the chest any more then performing flat benching. In fact inclines involve the anterior delts more so less chest growth is achieved.
I agree with this. The bench press can be performed with narrow, medium and wide grips with bench flat, incline or decline so in theory one could hit the chest at 9 different points. We all know this is theory and unrealistic. Keep bench pressing flat with your heavy weights. I found decline made it difficult to control a heavy weight therefore dangerous (it's not a narural pushing position). A slight incline is OK and useful if you have been doing a lot of flat pressing and want to hit the large chest muscle at slightly a different angle. The variation will allow the muscle to grow better this way. Remember, slight incline otherwise you will bring your shoulders too much into play (nearly a shoulder press) resulting in less stress on the chest.
 
#12
Agent_Smith said:
Just think about it for a minute.

Press up limited by your own body weight.

Bench press limited by how strong you are (or get).

Now ask your self which one is best :wink:
Ths me fucked then no way I an lift that!
 
#13
meiktilaman said:
Agent_Smith said:
Just think about it for a minute.

Press up limited by your own body weight.

Bench press limited by how strong you are (or get).

Now ask your self which one is best :wink:
Ths me fucked then no way I an lift that!
I think you misunderstood that part meiktilaman. All press ups are body weight, a great proportion is taken by the legs and a rigid back/torso ensures one is pressing body weight and not loose, dead weight.

If you have difficulty carrying out a strict press up (hands and feet in contact with the floor only) then press with your knees in contact with the floor to eleviate some weight. Also, press against a table or raised surface so you are not goin down as far.
 
#14
O2Thief said:
meiktilaman said:
Agent_Smith said:
Just think about it for a minute.

Press up limited by your own body weight.

Bench press limited by how strong you are (or get).

Now ask your self which one is best :wink:
Ths me fucked then no way I an lift that!
I think you misunderstood that part meiktilaman. All press ups are body weight, a great proportion is taken by the legs and a rigid back/torso ensures one is pressing body weight and not loose, dead weight.

If you have difficulty carrying out a strict press up (hands and feet in contact with the floor only) then press with your knees in contact with the floor to eleviate some weight. Also, press against a table or raised surface so you are not goin down as far.

Mmmmmm thanks for that lol!
 
P

plw1970

Guest
#15
The big three basic power exercises, bench press, squat and dead lift are the key to building the major muscle groups, somehow they dont compare to press ups.

That said, if you do not have access to a gym or weights, then concentrate on a good technique and press ups are fine.
 
#16
Hello. I`m new here.

I have a quick question.

When doing press-ups, what percentage of your bodyweight are you lifting?

I realise it will vary due to build, height etc.

I reckon about 60-70% of your bodyweight.

Anyone know how to work it out properly?

Cheers in advance lads.
 
#18
Do press ups with your feet lifted higher each time 10 of each i.e.
feet on floor
feet on step
feet on chair
feet on top of chair
handstand

build up to more and more
 
#19
Ay up JR i don,t know about you but i reckon a handstand sounds like a challenge. :plotting:
 
#20
Fallschirmjager said:
A myth. 90% of the chest is made up of the pectoris major. One muscle! Forget the pec minor. In fact inclines involve the anterior delts more so less chest growth is achieved.
I think yours is the myth parachuter! Remember if you only train in one plane (one direction), you will only gain strength in that plane, and the chest is comprised of the pectoralis major and pectoralis minor. The pectoralis minor muscle is used in true abduction (protraction) without rotation along with the serratus anterior muscle. The pectoralis minor is most used in depressing and rotating the scapula downward from an upwardly rotated position. This is best accomplished by raising the body a few inches higher in the top position of bar dips. The pectoralis major is used powerfully in push-ups and pull-ups. It works closely together with the anterior deltoid and as a helper of the latissimus dorsi muscle when extending and adducting the humerus from a raised position. A bit technical, I know, but basically variation of training in all angles will achieve best results, unless you only want bulk (not really advisable for usable strength).
 

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