Ben & Jerrys sorry for Irish "Black & Tan" upset

#1
Not sure how this one got missed....

DUBLIN (Reuters) - Ice cream makers Ben & Jerry's have apologized for causing offence by calling a new flavor "Black & Tan" -- the nickname of a notoriously violent British militia that operated during Ireland's war of independence.

The ice cream, available only in the United States, is based on an ale and stout drink of the same name.

"Any reference on our part to the British Army unit was absolutely unintentional and no ill-will was ever intended," said a Ben & Jerry's spokesman.

"Ben & Jerry's was built on the philosophies of peace and love," he added.

The Black and Tans, so-called because of their two-tone uniforms, were recruited in the early 1920s to bolster the ranks of the police force in Ireland as anti-British sentiment grew.

They quickly gained a reputation for brutality and mention of the militia still arouses strong feelings in Ireland.

"I can't believe that Ben & Jerry's would be so insensitive to call an ice cream such a name and to launch it as a celebration of Irishness ... it's an insult!" wrote one blogger on www.junkfoodblog.com.

"I hope they don't try to launch it here in Ireland or I imagine they'll lose a lot of their fans."
http://today.reuters.com/news/Artic...2513Z_01_L21365906_RTRUKOC_0_US-BENJERRYS.xml
 
#2
Methinks a quick read of Irish history would have been in order. There remains a deep amount of pain because of the actions of the Tans. The Croke Park massacre is just one example. There are still people alive today who lost relatives due to their actions.
 
#3
There are people alive today who know people who were killed by the Germans and Italians in WWII, don't mean I'm going to stop eating Bratty's and Pizza though !!..........the PC Brigade gone silly again ?
 
#4
Not PC, just another example of clinging to the past like a wretched blood stained cloak, let it go FFS, and move on into the 21st century.
 
#5
The ice cream, available only in the United States, is based on an ale and stout drink of the same name.

"I can't believe that Ben & Jerry's would be so insensitive to call an ice cream such a name and to launch it as a celebration of Irishness ... it's an insult!" wrote one blogger on www.junkfoodblog.com.

"I hope they don't try to launch it here in Ireland or I imagine they'll lose a lot of their fans."
But you can order a Black and Tan (usually made with Guinness floated over Harp's, if you're interested) almost anywhere in the States that serves Guinness. That can hardly be news. And I've never heard any outrage about that...I remember thinking the first time I heard it, "Well, that's an odd name for a drink, considering." I was in an Irish bar (the lino shopfront kind) in Chicago when I ordered my first one, actually. Most people could only identify it as a drink, I 'd guess, unless you lived in Boston. So I can see how an American company with no Irish history buffs in the marketing department might think it was harmless.

Then again, you can also order an Irish Car Bomb pretty much anywhere in the States, including the English expat bar I used to go to.
 
#6
PartTimePongo said:
Not sure how this one got missed....

DUBLIN (Reuters) - Ice cream makers Ben & Jerry's have apologized for causing offence by calling a new flavor "Black & Tan" -- the nickname of a notoriously violent British militia that operated during Ireland's war of independence.

The ice cream, available only in the United States, is based on an ale and stout drink of the same name.

"Any reference on our part to the British Army unit was absolutely unintentional and no ill-will was ever intended," said a Ben & Jerry's spokesman.

"Ben & Jerry's was built on the philosophies of peace and love," he added.

The Black and Tans, so-called because of their two-tone uniforms, were recruited in the early 1920s to bolster the ranks of the police force in Ireland as anti-British sentiment grew.

They quickly gained a reputation for brutality and mention of the militia still arouses strong feelings in Ireland.

"I can't believe that Ben & Jerry's would be so insensitive to call an ice cream such a name and to launch it as a celebration of Irishness ... it's an insult!" wrote one blogger on www.junkfoodblog.com.

"I hope they don't try to launch it here in Ireland or I imagine they'll lose a lot of their fans."
http://today.reuters.com/news/Artic...2513Z_01_L21365906_RTRUKOC_0_US-BENJERRYS.xml
It did not get missed. It was in the Times three days ago along with a pic of the tub in question.
 
#8
Well I'll just carry on licking my stick of Gibraltar rock and read my Bobby Sands cookbook.
 
#9
The_Dragoon said:
There are people alive today who were killed by the Germans and Italians in WWII, don't mean I'm going to stop eating Bratty's and Pizza though !!..........the PC Brigade gone silly again ?
Not really. It isn't as though the Germans are trying to sell "Waffen SS Bratties", guaranteed loads of pork meat, and I have yet to see an Italian restuarant in the UK offering "Il Duce's Favourite Facist Foccacia". I don't think that there is any complaint about the icecream, just the name.
 
#10
mistersoft said:
Well I'll just carry on licking my stick of Gibraltar rock and read my Bobby Sands cookbook.

Would you like some Farrell nuts sprinkled over your rock mistersoft :twisted:
 
#14
HavocIRL said:
Andyroo said:
There are still people alive today who lost relatives due to their actions.
My grandfather was at the croke park massacre aged 7.
If eveyone alive today who claimed to have been at Croke Park was really there, it's a miracle the Auxies could get in to shoot them! If the numbers that they represent were really there then there was no need to expand the stadium and the current capacity represents a reduction if anything!

I think it is very important to remember that the "Black and Tans" were an expansion of the Police, the RIC. The real bad hats and the main striking force were of course the Auxiliary Cadets. Nowadays I think many of them would be diagnosed with adjustment disorders or PTSD. Quite a few ricocheted from one to another of the mini-campaigns of 1918-1920, Russia, Ireland and other oddities. Many had been decorated more than once - usually photographs show MC followed by MM on a youthful chest, which tell a clear story of bold young leaders. Their activities were quite brutal and they were responsible for most of the outrage. Their distinctive uniform item, which incidentally was full on khaki usually, was a TOS but this has no relevance to Scottishness.

Not unremarkably, there are few memoirs or documents in the public domain which refer to their activities. They were without doubt the nastiest bunch we sent into the emerald Isle, in a long list of nasty pieces of work from Cromwell to Percivale. There are some fascinating shots of "Axies" taking their leisure around an armoured tender in the National museum in Dub'.
 
#15
Dread said:
The_Dragoon said:
There are people alive today who were killed by the Germans and Italians in WWII
:lol: :lol:

A rapid bit of editing by someone?


Dread said:
Not really. It isn't as though the Germans are trying to sell "Waffen SS Bratties", guaranteed loads of pork meat, and I have yet to see an Italian restuarant in the UK offering "Il Duce's Favourite Facist Foccacia". I don't think that there is any complaint about the icecream, just the name.
There are many people around today who loathe all things German &/or Japanese. The few I know are not open to reasoning to change their opinions and won't be 'moving on' in their lifetimes. Another 20 years or so and they'll all be gone. Then we can all be PC and not mention the war again.

The Black & Tans made a dreadful reputation for themselves. Many were unemployable ex-WW1 officers who were accustomed to killing. A relative was about 5 at the time, but recalls all the kids running in terror when their lorries were heard approaching. They could also reel off a list of people who'd been shot by the B&Ts, for no specific reason.
 
#17
As these things do, I've been started off afresh trying to find out more about the auxies or Auxiliary Division. I am astounded to see that two VCs served with the auxies, Onions VC and Leach VC. Check out the wikiPedia entry on the Tans and all sorts of interesting B&T facts are revealed.
 
#19
#20
It get's even better...the famous order by Col Ferguson Smyth to shoot on sight is published to show how black-hearted the Tans were on a number of web-sites. What is far more interesting is this snippet, found on an Irish local history web-site!

At 10.30 pm on July 17 1920, Lt. Col. Gerard Bryce Ferguson Smyth, Divisional Police Commissioner for Munster was having a drink at the County Club at Smith Street, Cork City, when a dozen volunteers from various battalions of Cork's No. 1 Brigade entered the building. While some remained on guard at the entrance with a waiter who was involved in the attack John O'Connell, Sean Culhane, Sean O'Donoghue, Daniel O'Donovan, Cornelius O'Sullivan and one other man made their way upstairs to the smoking room where Smyth was.

One of the men walked up to Smyth and allegedly said: 'Your orders were to shoot on sight. You are in sight now so make ready', after which he was shot a number of times. RIC County Inspector Craig was wounded in the leg during the attack. The assailants then ran out of the club and mingled with the crowds coming out of cinemas nearby.

On the following day General Strickland, Commander of British forces in the area, ordered a curfew and armoured cars and military police and soldiers patrolled the streets of Cork. An attack was made on a Black and Tan patrol that evening, a Sunday, but in the shooting that followed one civilian was killed and six wounded.

On 21 July 1920, Lt Col Smyth, a one armed veteran of the First World War, was buried at the public cemetery, Newry Road, Banbridge, Co. Down. After his death, three days of rioting took place in Belfast and a number of Catholics lost their lives. There was also rioting in Banbridge and Dromore, Co. Down, with one person being killed in Dromore.

Background

On 19 June 1920, Smyth addressed RIC personnel at Listowel Barracks, Co. Kerry at which he encouraged a shoot to kill policy. As a result of this, Constable Jeremiah Mee placed his revolver on a table and refused to carry out further duties as he recognised the speech to be an incitement to murder. When senior police officers present ordered Mee to be removed the other constables refused. The incident became known as the Listowel Mutiny.

Because of the content of this speech, Sean O'Hegarty, Acting Commander of Cork No. 1 Brigade, decided to have Smyth eliminated. The County Club in Cork was frequented by high-ranking military officers and people loyal to the Government. The staff were also considered to be loyalists and so the IRA found it very difficult to obtain information about the club and those who visited it. However, the position changed when Sean Culhane, Intelligence Officer of B Company of the IRA's First Cork Battalion made contact with a waiter at the club, Ned Fitzgerald, who supplied information regarding Smyth and so the IRA were able to mount their attack.

In early October, 1920 Smyth's brother, Major George Osbert Stirling Smyth, was killed as he commanded a party of soldiers trying to arrest Tipperary republicans Dan Breen and Sean Treacy at Drumcondra in Dublin. As the Major was about to enter a top floor bedroom shots were fired from inside the room killing him. Smyth was later buried beside his brother at Banbridge.

Apparently upon hearing of his brother's death, Major Smyth, who was on military service in Egypt with the Royal Field Artillery, had applied for intelligence duty in Ireland. It is said that he had come to Ireland with eleven picked men in an attempt to avenge his brother's death in Cork.
 

Similar threads

Latest Threads

Top