Beirut Explosion, so what was it?

After my post about where to donate money yesterday, one of our muckers kindly sent me a PM regarding an NGO engaged in mine clearance in the Mt Lebanon and other areas. After having had the night to consider it I am now writing this.
I am thinking about how I could help Beirutis with their current plight.
As far as mines go, any laid in Lebanon have been laid by the Lebanese and are their responsibility. Mt. Lebanon is in the centre of the country - why would anyone lay mines there anyway? Neither is the population particularly poor, which makes me wonder why a foreign NGO is using its valuable resources there.
In 1983 a homeowner in the Chouf went abroad and planted AP mines around his home, without notifying the authorities. The first I heard of it was the sound of some of my colleagues going up on them.
 

philc

LE
I'd say..at a decent speed-realistically its around the 45-50 minute mark. I think a line from around Lancaster could be confidently drawn across the country and all of the cretins above said line be considered as porridge wogs.

@BossHogg @AlienFTM
Thats a decent speed Central Manchester to Gretna Green is 128 Miles. I consider Manchester to be the Midlands.
 
Why does the rest of the UK have to be contaminated by the likes of you? Stay in London, leave the rest of us alone.
Too late old son, we have been up here in the west midlands for 32 years, And please, consult someone professional about your anger management problems.
 
After my post about where to donate money yesterday, one of our muckers kindly sent me a PM regarding an NGO engaged in mine clearance in the Mt Lebanon and other areas. After having had the night to consider it I am now writing this.
I am thinking about how I could help Beirutis with their current plight.
As far as mines go, any laid in Lebanon have been laid by the Lebanese and are their responsibility. Mt. Lebanon is in the centre of the country - why would anyone lay mines there anyway? Neither is the population particularly poor, which makes me wonder why a foreign NGO is using its valuable resources there.
In 1983 a homeowner in the Chouf went abroad and planted AP mines around his home, without notifying the authorities. The first I heard of it was the sound of some of my colleagues going up on them.
I think the Mount Lebanon mines were laid by one or other of the Loony Toons factions mentioned above in the 80’s. Not really the fault of the kids standing on them now though.

We’ve discussed up thread the inequality of distribution of wealth in Lebanon, of course. The people stepping on stuff now tend not to be the ones who own(ed) the super yachts on the Corniche.

There’s also one or two cluster munitions further south that were deposited by, er, someone else :)
 
I'd say..at a decent speed-realistically its around the 45-50 minute mark. I think a line from around Lancaster could be confidently drawn across the country and all of the cretins above said line be considered as porridge wogs.

@BossHogg @AlienFTM

If you drew a line across the country from Lancaster an Nuked everything south of it the world would probably be a better place.....
 

offog

LE
If you drew a line across the country from Lancaster an Nuked everything south of it the world would probably be a better place.....
There wouldn't be much left of the world then just Canada and bits of Russia.
 
Yeah - just the cities and large towns need bleaching.
Having said that the Mersey from its start at the confluence of the Goyt and Tame and down under stockport town centre is a pleasent and interesting paddle, if you can dodge the shopping trolleys.

Need some rain, the rivers are far too low!
 
Security cam vid, brutal!

 
I think the Mount Lebanon mines were laid by one or other of the Loony Toons factions mentioned above in the 80’s. Not really the fault of the kids standing on them now though.

We’ve discussed up thread the inequality of distribution of wealth in Lebanon, of course. The people stepping on stuff now tend not to be the ones who own(ed) the super yachts on the Corniche.

There’s also one or two cluster munitions further south that were deposited by, er, someone else :)
Fair points indeed.

In 1982 there was scant awareness regarding the problematic aspects of cluster munitions. As we advanced northwards we started coming across these innocuous looking little metal things with a ribbons on one end, as well as rather interesting looking little cast aluminium things with spring-loaded mini-wings. There were quite a few IDF casualties due to not knowing about cluster munitions and within a short time combat rations boxes contained illustrated warning sheets.
At some point my unit took over a makeshift set of sangars in the front line with the Syrians, north of Jebel e Sheikh. When our predecessors had set up there, they put rings of pebbles around any UX anti armour cluster bomblets (the ones with the ribbons) that were around and we, carefully stepped over them for over a week until bomb disposal turned up (expressing incredulity that we'd been living like that).
 
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Fair points indeed.

In 1982 there was scant awareness regarding the problematic aspects of cluster munitions. As we advanced northwards we started coming across these innocuous looking little metal things with a ribbons on one end, as well as little aluminium casts with little spring-loaded wings. There were quite a few IDF casualties due to ignorance. Within a short time combat rations boxes included illustrated warning sheets. At some point my unit took over a makeshift set of sangars in the front line with the Syrians, north of Jebel e Sheikh. When our predecessors set up there, they put rings of pebbles around any anti armour cluster bomblets (the ones with the ribbons) that were around and we carefully stepped over them for over a week until bomb disposal turned up (expressing incredulity that we'd been cracking on like that).
The ones with the little ribbons are variations on the M42. About the size of a U2/Type C battery. They can be delivered by a variety of means, and can be very very sensitive. What’s worse is they don’t look like ammunition.

 
The ones with the little ribbons are variations on the M42. About the size of a U2/Type C battery. They can be delivered by a variety of means, and can be very very sensitive. What’s worse is they don’t look like ammunition.

excuse me being thick, what’s the function of the ribbon?
 

TamH70

MIA
excuse me being thick, what’s the function of the ribbon?
Lets the bomblet fly a bit further if my reading on the matter a few years ago was accurate. The windstream catches the ribbon.
 
excuse me being thick, what’s the function of the ribbon?
Two-fold.

[spotter head engaged]

First is to align it so it falls with the shaped charge cone facing down. It’s a tiny amount of explosive so is designed to work by top attack. It also has a pre-formed fragment casing to give it a dual purpose as an anti-personnel munition.

The second function of the ribbon is to operate the ‘safe to arm’ mechanism. It spins the munition in descent so that it unwinds a tiny little grub screw. This allows in turn a little bit of metal to slide out due to centrifugal force and align the detonator with the main charge and the firing pin. Until all three are aligned the munition is comparatively safe. This is important immediately after the opening of the canister as the munitions are all banging into each other at that point.

Most American cluster munitions - when armed - require the equivalent of a one-inch drop onto a hard surface.

Although it’s an impact-fuzed weapon, about 10% don’t function on impact.

ETA - not a thick question at all...
 

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