Beirut Explosion, so what was it?

There are some details here

Thanks.

She appears to be a map spotter explaining in great detail why she had to change the projection of the original map.

As far as I can see, she doesn’t explain what the 1k, 5k and 10k circles purport to represent.

The 10k circle could represent ‘risk of broken glass’, for example, or it could represent the distance at which earth tremors are felt.
 
It's funny you should say that:

The journo, who was threatened with death by the Hez that I've mentioned, had been watching our colleagues in Haifa doing 'lives': Their reports were occasionally punctuated by rockets landing nearby. Naturally he was very jealous of this appearance of danger and ruggedness.

When he did his next live report he donned his helmet and armour and mid flow, would give the odd glance up to the skies, apparently fearful of imminent attack. I was watching all this from another loction and was able to reach the cameraman on the comms. I tried to get the bloke to zoom out but despite my threats and bribes he wouldn't..

If he had zoomed out he would have revealed the fact that the BBC, Sky and ABC, next to the Fox position, were all sitting around in shorts, chatting and sipping cokes in completely zero peril.
I met a lot of the journos who were working in Bosnia and based around Vitez in 1993. Being a menial type, one of my jobs was to ensure there were plenty of beers at the P-info house. It was rumoured my boss (the P-info liaison officer was having an affair with Kate Aidie since they always seemed to disappear around the same time).

This was at the time bonking-Bob-Stewart was humping his interpreter.

But one of the benefits of my job was that the two-can-rule didn't apply to me and I used to get shit-faced most nights with the war reporters and listen to their stories. There were some good looking female war reporters there too. I particularly liked a blonde SA one who smelt lovely.

I met Martin Bell and Kate Adie. Bell was walking funny because he'd a shrapnel wound in his abdomen (though someone told me it was really in his scrotum). Neither of which used to hang about for the late night drinking sessions.

But respect to them. It's one thing going to a dodgy places as 'the British army'. It's something completely different going there as an unarmed civilian war correspondent.
 
The author of that piece? " Ra'anan Elozory is a Jerusalem educator and former film editor who is a promoter of truth in media, who has intel sources he cannot disclose."

Bearing in mind that in the article he confuses ammonium nitrate with ANFO I'm not sure he should be trusted as a particularly informed commentator. Here's a better version from people who actually know what they are talking about - The chemistry behind the Beirut explosion but that wouldn't give you an excuse to work in the Jooz being involved, would it?
A chemist appeared on German TV yesterday and stated that the colour was typical for an explosion with ammonium nitrate. What I haven't seen mentioned so far is that NO2 is a rather nasty gas, among other things it can oxidise in air to form NO3, which when mixed with water forms nitric acid. NO2 is also formed from vehicle exhausts and gives rise to all that lovely contaminated air in our inner cities.
 
A chemist appeared on German TV yesterday and stated that the colour was typical for an explosion with ammonium nitrate. What I haven't seen mentioned so far is that NO2 is a rather nasty gas, among other things it can oxidise in air to form NO3, which when mixed with water forms nitric acid. NO2 is also formed from vehicle exhausts and gives rise to all that lovely contaminated air in our inner cities.
Not sure on that one. Nitrogen chemistry gets very weird in terms of redox but I'm pretty sure dissolving NO2 in water gives nitric acid (HNO3) and a lot of other weird disproportionation products. It's reversible which is why conc. nitric will very slowly give off red fumes of NO2. Fuming nitric acid, as the name suggests, gives off a lot more.

Deeply unpleasant stuff that really stings. From what I have been told a lethal dose doesn't produce much in the way of symptoms immediately but lung damage and the associated oedema kills within about a week.
 
Thanks.

She appears to be a map spotter explaining in great detail why she had to change the projection of the original map.

As far as I can see, she doesn’t explain what the 1k, 5k and 10k circles purport to represent.

The 10k circle could represent ‘risk of broken glass’, for example, or it could represent the distance at which earth tremors are felt.
From @stacker1 's link . . .

Published by: Connor Parker, Yahoo News UK, 06 August 2020.

Maps show scale of massive Beirut explosion as if it happened in London or New York.

It is impossible to accurately state whether the levels of destruction are comparable with London and New York. For example, the significant number of densely packed, high rise buildings in both cities could have cushioned the blow and reduced the spread . . .

Similarly, the explosion would likely have caused more damage in London due to a large amount of the blast radius in Beirut being absorbed by the Mediterranean sea
However, had the explosion happened in central London it is possible the House of Commons, Buckingham Palace and Westminster Abbey would have all been caught in the blast.

Most of the City of London, in theory, would fall within the same radius as well as areas as far as Hampstead Heath and Norbury.

Merson explained she avoided using Google Maps due to the images being projected in Web Mercator, which stretches the earth to make it look like a square.

This is done because it is impossible to make the spherical earth appear perfectly in proportion on a flat image.

She also notes her maps fail to account for topography, noting “it looks like the actual damage stretched farther along the coastline and not as far inland, uphill?”

Merson emphasised her maps did not model what the damage would have been to other cities, they were just there to help visualise the scale of explosion and the wreckage it caused.

If the blast had occurred in New York the roughly six-mile radius of damage would have reached as far as The Bronx and likely flattened Wall Street.
Merson emphasised her maps did not model what the damage would have been to other cities, they were just there to help visualise the scale of explosion and the wreckage it caused.
 
Not sure on that one. Nitrogen chemistry gets very weird in terms of redox but I'm pretty sure dissolving NO2 in water gives nitric acid (HNO3) and a lot of other weird disproportionation products. It's reversible which is why conc. nitric will very slowly give off red fumes of NO2. Fuming nitric acid, as the name suggests, gives off a lot more.

Deeply unpleasant stuff that really stings. From what I have been told a lethal dose doesn't produce much in the way of symptoms immediately but lung damage and the associated oedema kills within about a week.
Being a bit picky, but stretching my memory back to ancient chemistry lessons NO2 does oxidise and then forms nitric acid with water, I believe it is also possible that NO2 can form nitrous acid. Either way round the inhabitants of Beirut have another problem to deal with as that amount of NO2 is not going to disappear over night.
 
Published by: Connor Parker, Yahoo News UK, 06 August 2020.

Maps show scale of massive Beirut explosion as if it happened in London or New York.

It is impossible to accurately state whether the levels of destruction are comparable with London and New York. For example, the significant number of densely packed, high rise buildings in both cities could have cushioned the blow and reduced the spread . . .


Merson emphasised her maps did not model what the damage would have been to other cities, they were just there to help visualise the scale of explosion and the wreckage it caused.
Er, yes. No need to put it in bold. Actually your two bolded sections rather contradict themselves.

If you look at the original post, and my original question, you’ll see that the point is, unless you understand what the key of the map is, it’s not much help.

This might explain better:

 
Being a bit picky, but stretching my memory back to ancient chemistry lessons NO2 does oxidise and then forms nitric acid with water, I believe it is also possible that NO2 can form nitrous acid.
You won't oxidise NO2 to anything in a higher oxidation state with atmospheric oxygen (that I know of). Nitrate is an ion, not a gas, and to do that would mean producing an O+ ion.

Having just looked it up the NO2 disproportionates to nitric and nitrous acids when reacting with water. The nitrous acid will readily oxidise to nitric acid which is probably what you were thinking of.

For an element that almost all the time does absolutely nothing nitrogen can be quite exciting when it chooses.
 
Actually on the point of the presence or absence of fireworks it is true there aren't very many "fireworks" visible for a "fireworks warehouse" going up. On the other hand that presupposes that the "firework warehouse" was the first thing to catch fire and remained the main component of any fire until the AN went up.
 
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