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Beirut Explosion, so what was it?

My boss was executed in Burundi by rebels. They'd ambushed a convoy and took a couple of UN heads of mission and a few others. A couple were killed but the CP bloke of the one HoM pulled a short on the bloke doing the executing, drilled him and his oppo and got his primary and the rest of the survivors out of there, running to a local sugar mill.

I got called off the day's sched to go fetch body bags and pick them all up with an armed security team.

Whether to be armed or not is a dilemma. When we travel as a team our security advisers are officially listed as 'producers' so they will rarely be overtly armed. As a news or documentary crew there's a line you don't want to cross in a combat zone. That said, we do hire armed locals in certain circumstances and occasionally the group we are filming with will supply an escort: Although flying along in the back of a bakkie with 2 kids waving AKs in condition 0 is a little nerve wracking.

The only time I have carried any form of weapon at work was in Namibia. We were bivvying for a few days so the Anti Poaching Unit section I was with lent me an R1 to 'scare lions'!
 
Well your post has led to two things being clarified for me. It reminded me of the story of a WW1 poet that stayed in mind since I listened to it on Radio Four when I was but a lad. Apparently he was killed by the concussive wave of a passing shell, leaving no mark on his body, only hours before the final cease fire.
So I checked on Wikipedia, first to work out which poet it was (Edward Thomas). I then found out that that story was apparently concocted in order to save his widow's feelings. A letter written by his CO in 1936 revealed the truth, that he had been shot through the chest.

One lives and learns. Cheers.

It was a well-known phenomena in Nelsonian times - of sailors and soldiers dying as a result of the shock wave from a passing cannonball. There was a vernacular term for it...but I can't recall it just at the moment. Nelson's surgeon, William Beatty, recorded it and I think conducted PMEs on some of those that died.
 
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Thus making herself avaible for the next government...

Very possibly...

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Looks wise, not your typical Lebanese either, more your all American girl....
 
Off topic and probably not very sensitive... but, lots of nice cars in a city/country supposedly so ‘poor’.

There's a lot of money in Lebanon and Beirut is a 'Tale of two Cities' with much poverty in the South. However it's flexible banking system generates wealth for many and despite it's troubled past, the place is still a popular tourist destination.
 
There's a lot of money in Lebanon and Beirut is a 'Tale of two Cities' with much poverty in the South. However it's flexible banking system generates wealth for many and despite it's troubled past, the place is still a popular tourist destination.
And as I'm sure you've noted in your travels, the Lebanese are incredibly entrepreneurial. Anywhere you went in Africa there used to be Lebanese traders...now displaced by the Chinese.
 
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There's a lot of money in Lebanon and Beirut is a 'Tale of two Cities' with much poverty in the South. However it's flexible banking system generates wealth for many and despite it's troubled past, the place is still a popular tourist destination.

Who goes to Beirut for their summer holiday?
 

theinventor

Old-Salt
And as I'm sure you've noted in your travels, the Lebanese are incredibly entrepreneurial. Anywhere you went in Africa there used to be Lebanese traders...now displaced by the Chinese.

A prime source of funding for Hezbollah through all kinds of deals as well as protection business.

Yes indeed.

Hezbollah gave Daesh a kicking when the latter tried to get involved in the former's crops in the Beqaa Valley. As I'm sure @Ciggie can report, the supply of fine Lebanese Red and Blonde (not white!) was uninterrupted.
 
Last published survey is dated 2017 (although it was done again in 2018 and seems to be an annual event now). The stern appears to be starting to move south down the slope into the channel. The forward section seems to be cracking and collapsing. If it collapses in on itself in a big enough lump could it set the cargo off...?

In 2000 the MCA surveyed the cargo and determined the following munitions onboard:-

Some mad bugger wants to gas-axe the masts off!

The natives are nervous...
Why didn't they just unload it at the time of the accident , when the cargo was at least new and stable ?
 
Why didn't they just unload it at the time of the accident , when the cargo was at least new and stable ?

They did try to *discharge her:

'Although immediate efforts were made to salvage the cargo, the vessel broke in two, flooded and sank before the salvage operations could be completed.'

* Pedant alert: A vessel is loaded and discharged - not unloaded
 

Auld-Yin

ADC
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
Reviews Editor
They did try to *discharge her:

'Although immediate efforts were made to salvage the cargo, the vessel broke in two, flooded and sank before the salvage operations could be completed.'

* Pedant alert: A vessel is loaded and discharged - not unloaded
Well the cargo was certainly 'discharged' earlier this week!

Anyway, an explosion in the Middle East - wasn't it nice that the video clips were not full of Mo's finest shouting "Allah'u Akbar"!

Too early?
 
They did try to *discharge her:

'Although immediate efforts were made to salvage the cargo, the vessel broke in two, flooded and sank before the salvage operations could be completed.'

* Pedant alert: A vessel is loaded and discharged - not unloaded
It's only a few feet down , they MUST have known all that stuff would eventually become unstable .
It's not as if the USN and RN didn't have divers ......
 

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