Army Rumour Service

Register a free account today to become a member! Once signed in, you'll be able to participate on this site by adding your own topics and posts, as well as connect with other members through your own private inbox!

Beirut Explosion, so what was it?

So to sum this all up... The Lebanese stole a ship load of AN probably with the intent to use it one day against their "opposition". But due to all manner of incompetence they had an ND.
No need for conspiracy tales there.
Not quite, although the incompetence bit is 100% correct. Classic example from Wiki:

Beirut and Mount Lebanon have been facing a severe garbage crisis. After the closure of the Bourj Hammoud dump in 1997, the al-Naameh dumpsite was opened by the government in 1998. The al-Naameh dumpsite was planned to contain 2 million tons of waste for a limited period of six years at the most. It was designed to be a temporary solution, while the government would have devised a long-term plan. Sixteen years later al-Naameh was still open and exceeded its capacity by 13 million tons. In July 2015 the residents of the area, already protesting in the recent years, forced the closure of the dumpsite.The inefficiency of the government, as well as the corruption inside of the waste management company Sukleen in charge of managing the garbage in Lebanon, have resulted in piles of garbage blocking streets in Mount Lebanon and Beirut.

In December 2015, the Lebanese government signed an agreement with Chinook Industrial Mining, part owned by Chinook Sciences, to export over 100,000 tons of untreated waste from Beirut and the surrounding area. The waste had accumulated in temporary locations following the government closure of the county's largest land fill site five months earlier. The contract was jointly signed with Howa International which has offices in Holland and Germany. The contract is reported to cost $212 per ton. The waste, which is compacted and infectious, would have to be sorted and was estimated to be enough to fill 2,000 containers. Initial reports that the waste was to be exported to Sierra Leone have been denied by diplomats.

In February 2016, the government withdrew from negotiations after it was revealed that documents relating to the export of the trash to Russia were forgeries. On 19 March 2016, the Cabinet reopened the Naameh landfill for 60 days in line with a plan it passed few days earlier to end the trash crisis. The plan also stipulates the establishment of landfills in Bourj Hammoud and Costa Brava, east and south of Beirut respectively. Sukleen trucks began removing piled garbage from Karantina and heading to Naameh. Environment Minister Mohammad Machnouk announced during a chat with activists that more than 8,000 tons of garbage had been collected so far as part of the government's trash plan in only 24 hours. The plan's execution is still ongoing. In 2017, Human Rights Watch found that Lebanon's garbage crisis, and open burning of waste in particular, was posing a health risk to residents and violating the state's obligations under international law.

In September 2018, Lebanon's parliament passed a law that banned open dumping and burning of waste. Despite penalties set in case of violations, Lebanese municipalities have been openly burning the waste, putting the lives of people in danger. In October 2018, Human Rights Watch researchers witnessed the open burning of dumps in al-Qantara and Qabrikha.
 
Off topic and probably not very sensitive... but, lots of nice cars in a city/country supposedly so ‘poor’.

You need to check the Gini index.

The problem is that in Nabateyah and South Lebanon people are dirt poor.

A lot of the boats/villas/mercs etc belong to the Lebanese diaspora, who maintain second homes there whilst actually living in Europe or the States. They often import Syrian families to mind the fort between visits.
 
You need to check the Gini index.

The problem is that in Nabateyah and South Lebanon people are dirt poor.

A lot of the boats/villas/mercs etc belong to the Lebanese diaspora, who maintain second homes there whilst actually living in Europe or the States. They often import Syrian families to mind the fort between visits.
1.5 mill Syrian refuges in the country at last count in 2015.
 
Am I the only one thinking 'sod 'em'? They've known about the risks for 6 years and chose to either ignore them or accept a brown envelope to look the other way. This purge to arrest anyone with the word Manager in their title is merely a distraction. Inshallah...

Just look at the state of pretty much every country in the Arab/Muslim world from North Africa to Pakistan - civil wars, religous conflict, terrorists, crime, economies tanking, increasing poverty, spiralling debt and inflation, incompetence, government repression, and leaders with no morals or checks on their behaviour, and a general population which seems to have more than its fair share of idiots all over the place.

The Middle East is imploding and it is speeding up... I don't think we've seen the worst of it by a long way yet.

Still, at least the next Iranian revolution will be interesting. I'll bet there's more than a few in Iran thinking that maybe getting rid of the Shah wasn't such a good idea after all.
 
How the feck do you get to do that even on private property, regardless of how remote it is. There must/should have been approval from the local authorities, with corresponding risk assessments.
It was a bit of a strange story. My recollection of it is a bit vague now, but I seem to recall that they either had informed or got permission from, the Council, but had no need to inform the Police. Not surprisingly, when they heard the explosion, the locals phoned the Police rather than the Council, which lead to some running around.

I had a video of the explosion at one time. I'll have a look and see if I still have it.
 
You need to check the Gini index.

The problem is that in Nabateyah and South Lebanon people are dirt poor.

A lot of the boats/villas/mercs etc belong to the Lebanese diaspora, who maintain second homes there whilst actually living in Europe or the States. They often import Syrian families to mind the fort between visits.

The situation in Nabatiyeh
5FF17567-CB1A-41FC-89D2-4879170478A5.jpg
 

Flight

LE
Book Reviewer
To a man and woman, they come across as decent, articulate, intelligent and normal human beings, trying to make sense of the hand they have been dealt, because of their religion/tribe/caste.

You could put Adolf, Idi Amin, Pol Pot and Stalin on the BBC and they would come across pretty well compared to the staff.
 
Well looking at the before and after shots you have a pretty good idea where the seat of the explosion was, roughly where the warehouse was and the new basin now sits...

We were chatting at work today, and as we were discussing safety related issues I proposed that this one would make a good discussion case on how not to store bulk chemicals. One of my colleagues mentioned that a few years ago they had been bidding for a vehicle contract for a mining company, the vehicle was to be designed to inject AMFO mix into drilled blast holes to bring down the next batch of ore.

Unfortunately they didn't win the contract, but he did chuckle when I asked if the winner was an Irish company
 
I definitely don’t think ‘sod em’, particularly the many dead and injured who were probably just going about their daily business in total ignorance of the deadly presence in their midst. By all means condemn the privileged, corrupt individuals in positions of power and influence, many there only because of who they know, but not the rest of the population.
I’ve been watching the BBC documentary Once Upon a Time in Iraq, which features many talking head type interviews with ordinary Iraqis, caught up in the horrors of war following the 2003 invasion and toppling of Saddam. To a man and woman, they come across as decent, articulate, intelligent and normal human beings, trying to make sense of the hand they have been dealt, because of their religion/tribe/caste.
Very similar to the current horror in Lebanon I reckon.
By all means condemn the leaders, but not the people.
I watched both this and the excellent Vietnam war series and both programmes had the same effect on me. Particularly the Vietnam war series where the grunts on both sides came across as really good people whereas the chancers who sent them there came across as devious and corrupt.
 
Been there, believe me it would be no great loss.

I was there on business and got into the hotel quite late. The next morning I opened the curtains to be met with a great big steel wall slowing passing my hotel room and another bulk carrier departed the port. Shortly before the Pasha Bulka had made an unscheduled stop at the local beach.

As a resident of this fair city of Newcastle I can honestly say you were on the wrong side of town. Rehabilitation of the port area is substantial and growing and the beaches are lovely. North of there is the huge Stockton Beach with 4x4 access where I spend many a night fishing with a fire and an esky full of bait beer.

The area you are describing is on the island between newcastle and stockton (Koorigang) and houses a huge coal stockpile where all the Hunter Mines send coal to China and India, Orica refinery, grain silos and once an underground fire that burned for months!

 
Just look at the state of pretty much every country in the Arab/Muslim world from North Africa to Pakistan - civil wars, religous conflict, terrorists, crime, economies tanking, increasing poverty, spiralling debt and inflation, incompetence, government repression, and leaders with no morals or checks on their behaviour, and a general population which seems to have more than its fair share of idiots all over the place.

The Middle East is imploding and it is speeding up... I don't think we've seen the worst of it by a long way yet.

Still, at least the next Iranian revolution will be interesting. I'll bet there's more than a few in Iran thinking that maybe getting rid of the Shah wasn't such a good idea after all.
After I left the forces in 1980, I worked in an office in Knightsbridge with a number of rich Iranians who had seen the light and got their money out before the revolution. Listening to the conversions between these Iranians and their numerous visitors, I came to the conclusion that Iran was probably better off without them.
 

Flight

LE
Book Reviewer
Well looking at the before and after shots you have a pretty good idea where the seat of the explosion was, roughly warehouse was and the new basin now sits...

Crikey yes...

Hadn't thought of that.
 
Just look at the state of pretty much every country in the Arab/Muslim world from North Africa to Pakistan - civil wars, religous conflict, terrorists, crime, economies tanking, increasing poverty, spiralling debt and inflation, incompetence, government repression, and leaders with no morals or checks on their behaviour, and a general population which seems to have more than its fair share of idiots all over the place.

The Middle East is imploding and it is speeding up... I don't think we've seen the worst of it by a long way yet.

Still, at least the next Iranian revolution will be interesting. I'll bet there's more than a few in Iran thinking that maybe getting rid of the Shah wasn't such a good idea after all.

Oman, Qatar and UAE seem to be doing alright.

The UK in my lifetime, has had Northern Ireland, Falkland, Iraq, Bosnia, Kosovo, Afghanistan, Iraq again, Libya, Syria, best not to point fingers. Especially as the UK had a hand in destabilizing several Middle Eastern countries.
 
Top