Behind the Scenes at GSG-9 (film is in boxhead)

This is a docu of the 3rd Company/Squadron of GSG-9 it shows some interesting training snippets and interestingly shows inside the block accomodation of the blokes. The bloke cycling in at the beginning is the Big Chief Jerome Fuchs, he started out as an operator climbing up anchor chains and kicking in doors.

 
As a polite bit of background, in 1984, these gents would pitch up at ILLRP in Weingarten. It was for one of those - run, swim, jump, shoot, drink, fart, fcuk , military sports competitions that were prevalent in those times.

As Brits, we were somewhat wary of such events. however, the Winter season, for whatever reason, the ski/ shoot competitions seemed to strike a wealth of interest amongst us UK types.

Back to GSG-9 , these guys in those days, pitched up in the Welfern Kaserne, dressed in tailored olive green coveralls ( think, Red Arrows distinct dress) with a pistol belt and holstered revolver on display, which were at variance with camp rules. The hmmmmmnnnnnnnnn................. factor was registered amongst the UK team, not helped by two of the team who had done a liaison tour with them and having remarked during a squad run wearing coveralls and a WW2 stylee local helmet - "Wish my dad could see me now!"
 
As a polite bit of background, in 1984, these gents would pitch up at ILLRP in Weingarten. It was for one of those - run, swim, jump, shoot, drink, fart, fcuk , military sports competitions that were prevalent in those times.

As Brits, we were somewhat wary of such events. however, the Winter season, for whatever reason, the ski/ shoot competitions seemed to strike a wealth of interest amongst us UK types.

Back to GSG-9 , these guys in those days, pitched up in the Welfern Kaserne, dressed in tailored olive green coveralls ( think, Red Arrows distinct dress) with a pistol belt and holstered revolver on display, which were at variance with camp rules. The hmmmmmnnnnnnnnn................. factor was registered amongst the UK team, not helped by two of the team who had done a liaison tour with them and having remarked during a squad run wearing coveralls and a WW2 stylee local helmet - "Wish my dad could see me now!"
Those old style WW2 Fallschirmjaeger helmets were a sight to behold till they binned them for the titanium ones, nowadays like everyone else they wear the skateboard helmet.

They still do very well at the international competitions wiping the floor with most of the other teams, they used to arrive in Orlando for the big SWAT competiton - and destroy the fat American SWAT teams. First year they came over in the 90's there was a cock up on the temporary import paperwork for their MP5's so an acquaintance of mine let them borrow some of the contents of his personal gun room. In their own right they host the CTC, with those most peculiar trophies.
 
Just an observation. At various points you can see one of their badges:



By comparison, a Second World War German Close Combat Badge or Nahkampfspange in Gold:



Rather similar, aren't they? Minus that symbol, bayonet and potato masher grenade of course. ;)
 
Just an observation. At various points you can see one of their badges:



By comparison, a Second World War German Close Combat Badge or Nahkampfspange in Gold:



Rather similar, aren't they? Minus that symbol, bayonet and potato masher grenade of course. ;)
The oak leaf is used as a sign of strength on military insignia - the oak tree being considered strong and mighty etc. [anorak] If you look at the French para wings, on the right hand side under the rigging those are also meant to be oak leaves to indicate strength. The other side I think are laurel leaves to indicate intelligence and wisdom.[/anorak]

The insignia shown is the qualification insignia worn by members serving in the unit. When they reach that age and have to leave the unit depending on where they go they may be allowed to continue wearing it, or not if their new boss is a twonk. I have a few of their insignia, if I get chance tomorrow I will post them.
 
I have a few of their insignia, if I get chance tomorrow I will post them.
Pretend you're johng and just wear them...
 
I’m hoping that the balaclavas weren’t just for the cameras, and they do actually wear them round the house/barracks at all time :cool:

340ABA97-4F98-4A43-B649-AE604B691844.jpeg
 

Cold_Collation

LE
Book Reviewer
I’m hoping that the balaclavas weren’t just for the cameras, and they do actually wear them round the house/barracks at all time :cool:
"Und zo, vhy did you take ziss job?"
"Vell, I might able to kill ein man between drinks, und viss my bare hendz, but fundamentally I am very, very shy."
 
'What, he abseiled down into your bedroom throwing a noxious incapacitant substance through the window beforehand'.
But left a box of chocolates?
 

Robme

LE
The oak leaf is used as a sign of strength on military insignia - the oak tree being considered strong and mighty etc. [anorak] If you look at the French para wings, on the right hand side under the rigging those are also meant to be oak leaves to indicate strength. The other side I think are laurel leaves to indicate intelligence and wisdom.[/anorak]

The insignia shown is the qualification insignia worn by members serving in the unit. When they reach that age and have to leave the unit depending on where they go they may be allowed to continue wearing it, or not if their new boss is a twonk. I have a few of their insignia, if I get chance tomorrow I will post them.
The British Military award for a Mentioned in Despatches is an Oak Leaf.
 

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