Been offered a Lab puppy FoC: The catch?

#1
Hi,

The FP6 household is on the lookout for a second Labrador so we approached friends in the village, who from time to time breed from their dogs. Unfortunately they have no plans for a litter this year but apparently the BiL has a litter coming, and will be giving the pups away to a good home.

Wow – a good working line pup does not come cheap and he’s giving them away? Why?
Well it seems he kept a dog and a bitch behind from his last litter and didn’t keep them separated, so this litter coming is a result of the siblings mating with each other.

So how bad can this pup be?
The Dam and Sire have yet to be hip scored and I am waiting back on what their parents score was - but i have been assured it was "good".

Will it be a case of free now but a fortune in 5 years with trashed hips and visits to the vets? Will GPRA raise its ugly genetic head?
What are the drawbacks of taking a puppy from this litter?



I can’t say I have had much experience of dog breeding so I’m throwing this one out to those that may have more knowledge. Is this siuation something that should be avoided at all costs?

Thanks,
 
#5
You may get lucky and get a normal dog; after all line breeding is essentially how specific breeds were developed. However, even if it is physically sound it may take some time for mental issues to be exposed.

Breeders had the often used option of smacking the shit ones with a hammer- once it's a pet it may be a bit tricky to do what is right!
 

FORMER_FYRDMAN

LE
Book Reviewer
#6
Go for it - you'll make a fortune when it plays the banjo on "Britain's got talent".
 

ugly

LE
Moderator
#7
Give it a good home and dont let it breed!
Your brother is at least a tit, you can get morning after pills for dogs, not cheap but better than unwanted inbred litters!
 
#9
You may get lucky and get a normal dog; after all line breeding is essentially how specific breeds were developed. However, even if it is physically sound it may take some time for mental issues to be exposed.
Breeders had the often used option of smacking the shit ones with a hammer- once it's a pet it may be a bit tricky to do what is right!
O_M has the dilemma down pat - coming in from the garden looking like an exercise scenario for a forensic blood splatter class wouldn't go down well this FP minors 1 & 2.
 

ugly

LE
Moderator
#10
Take the pup and have his nuts off, one cross in line may be fine and you may pass up the chance of the pet mutt of a lifetime!
 
#11
Hi Ugly,
Your brother is at least a tit,
Yep, cannot but agree - but in this case the BiL mentioned is the origional breeders BiL.

At the moment I'm sort of thinking about taking this on, as long as I long as i get some positive answers from them, like the siblings parents score well and are in no way related.
 
#12
Go for it like Ugly suggests, but as you seem to be doing, do so with your eyes wide open and at least make sure it's physically good to go.

Are you going to work it?
 
#13
Being as you said that sire and dam are different lines, the chances on getting a good'un are good. So good luck with that.
 
#16
Go for it like Ugly suggests, but as you seem to be doing, do so with your eyes wide open and at least make sure it's physically good to go.

Are you going to work it?
No, if we go for it it'll be a family pet, and will be straight in to the vet for an apointment with Mr Scalpel!
 
#17
The wonderful gundogs we have were all produced through inbreeding, it's a hard call to make without the pups in front of you!

My best ever gun dog, a super intelligent type who seemed to read my mind, was an " alledged Labrador" it was a genetic throwback from a pedigree Gun dog litter and was due to be banged over the head with a shovel. His crimes: he was dark red gold in colour, had a curved tail and even as a pup, was built like Garth.

He was FoC by the way!
 
#18
You have to call it NIN (Normal in Norfolk) or Abdul.
 
#19
For a first generation close breeding there are unlikely to be any serious problems. You might like to read up on the coefficient of inbreeding (COI) it's explained on many dog-breeding websites. There's a beginner's guide here that even uses labs as an example:

A Beginner’s Guide to COI – Dog Breed Health


Give us a dead simple example

1. Breed two completely unrelated Labradors

2. Mate two of their offspring together

3. What is the resulting puppies’ COI?

In this instance the puppies’ COI will be 25% – that is, statistically, there is a 25% chance that any allele will contain the exact same gene as a direct result of having common ancestors – in this instance the same grandparents. This is in addition to the levels of homozygosity that would be present in the breed regardless.
 

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