Becoming an Electrician in the Royal Engineers

Hi All,

Im looking for some advice, I’m joining the RE as an Electrician, I was wondering would I gain sufficient experience in my army career if I was to leave, I could potentially work as an Electrical Engineer/Electrical Technician. I already went to college and got my NVQ Dip in Engineering and BTEC in Engineering.

Or

Would you recommend going for a different job role perhaps in the Royal Signals, apparently going in the Royal Engineers is fine as I would gain all aspects of electrical work with experience?
 
Hi All,

Im looking for some advice, I’m joining the RE as an Electrician, I was wondering would I gain sufficient experience in my army career if I was to leave, I could potentially work as an Electrical Engineer/Electrical Technician. I already went to college and got my NVQ Dip in Engineering and BTEC in Engineering.

Or

Would you recommend going for a different job role perhaps in the Royal Signals, apparently going in the Royal Engineers is fine as I would gain all aspects of electrical work with experience?

As a JIB App registered civvie sparkie, before taking the queens shilling, and a sparkie in the Royal signals, and resuming my sparkie career for a further 36 years on discharge, Army electricians are mainly concerned with mobile power, both in the R/Sigs And the RE's You will not in any way utilise army experience as a civvie electrician, you will not need or want civilian knowledge either in installation, containment types, first or second fix, or have to work out diversity factors of a given installation, work from installation schematics, or any aspect of electrical maintenance, In factory's or domestic environments.

Your only and main function is to drive to location, and provide mobile power, that's it, with a few minor associated jobs on the side.

An electrician in the army does not need to know, space factors, containment instillation techniques, diversity factors, cable capacities, work out volt drop, terminate and connect large calibre SWA cables, ditto with MICC cable, and certainly does not have to adhere to the IEE Regs. Your time in the mob as a electrician will set you up for mobile power in the OB world of TV transmissions, and in the film world for location filming, which is much of a closed shop, and notoriously hard to break into, I know, I tried, with lee electric, the main and biggest film contractor.

Your time as a army electrician will help in a small way, to obtain training through the CITB scheme. Your qualifications will also help, but having the theory is no substitute for hands on experience. Something that is critical, if you wish to follow a management role in the building and construction industry.

As A qualified electrician either at the coal face, or in the office, you will be able to command top rates of pay, in excess, in my case of £50k p/y, and as a qualified electrical Engineer with a an HNC, well in excess of that.

Contact the J.I.B. for further Details. I am now retired after 50.5 years as fully qualified and experienced electrician. It takes years to learn the trade, and you never stop learning. Any tradesman who says he knows it all, is lying. END
 
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As a JIB App registered civvie sparkie, before taking the queens shilling, and a sparkie in the Royal signals, and resuming my sparkie career for a further 36 years on discharge, Army electricians are mainly concerned with mobile power, both in the R/Sigs And the RE's You will not in any way utilise army experience as a civvie electrician, you will not need or want civilian knowledge either in installation, containment types, first or second fix, or have to work out diversity factors of a given installation, work from installation schematics, or any aspect of electrical maintenance, In factory's or domestic environments.

Your only and main function is to drive to location, and provide mobile power, that's it, with a few minor associated jobs on the side.

An electrician in the army does not need to know, space factors, containment instillation techniques, diversity factors, cable capacities, work out volt drop, terminate and connect large calibre SWA cables, ditto with MICC cable, and certainly does not have to adhere to the IEE Regs. Your time in the mob as a electrician will set you up for mobile power in the OB world of TV transmissions, and in the film world for location filming, which is much of a closed shop, and notoriously hard to break into, I know, I tried, with lee electric, the main and biggest film contractor.

Your time as a army electrician will help in a small way, to obtain training through the CITB scheme. Your qualifications will also help, but having the theory is no substitute for hands on experience. Something that is critical, if you wish to follow a management role in the building and construction industry.

As A qualified electrician either at the coal face, or in the office, you will be able to command top rates of pay, in excess, in my case of £50k p/y, and as a qualified electrical Engineer with a an HNC, well in excess of that.

Contact the J.I.B. for further Details. I am now retired after 50.5 years as fully qualified and experienced electrician. It takes years to learn the trade, and you never stop learning. Any tradesman who says he knows it all, is lying. END
Would you recommend going in as a spark, then coming out in EC amount of time then doing a HNC? Could I work offshore with the experience I’ve gained in the forces?
 
Would you recommend going in as a spark, then coming out in EC amount of time then doing a HNC? Could I work offshore with the experience I’ve gained in the forces?
I cannot answer, as the criteria for off shore are total different to land based practises. Contact the Institute of electrical engineers in london.
 

Actingunpaid

Clanker
I must have been very fortunate to have experience of working with RE sparkies cable jointing large calibre cables,getting tug-of-war practise on BFO cable drums etc. at Long Kesh.Shame if they don't get that sort of chance anymore.
 
I must have been very fortunate to have experience of working with RE sparkies cable jointing large calibre cables,getting tug-of-war practise on BFO cable drums etc. at Long Kesh.Shame if they don't get that sort of chance anymore.

Large calibre , in my world that is anything over 50mm 4 core SWA, anything smaller is considered a "Bootlace" cable.
 

Actingunpaid

Clanker
Large calibre , in my world that is anything over 50mm 4 core SWA, anything smaller is considered a "Bootlace" cable.
The cables were definitely that large.Took a tug-of -war team to haul them off drums lifted into place by crane.We were building the H blocks that went on to become HMP Maze at Hillsborough,near Lisburn.
 
The cables were definitely that large.Took a tug-of -war team to haul them off drums lifted into place by crane.We were building the H blocks that went on to become HMP Maze at Hillsborough,near Lisburn.

Mains feed from 11,000v site transformer, down to 415v 3 phase, @ 2000A+ feeding a mains switch room control panel, I suspect something in the region of a 250mm+, 4 core SWA, definitely a big one. Army, or civvie contractors?
 

Actingunpaid

Clanker
It was certainly all Army at the bits I was on,RE,Pioneer Corps,and some DoE types from what I remember.Best part of it was heating up the tar to pour into the lead? bomb-size cable joints as it was a bloody cold winter (71/72).
 

chimera

LE
Moderator
As a JIB App registered civvie sparkie, before taking the queens shilling, and a sparkie in the Royal signals, and resuming my sparkie career for a further 36 years on discharge, Army electricians are mainly concerned with mobile power, both in the R/Sigs And the RE's You will not in any way utilise army experience as a civvie electrician, you will not need or want civilian knowledge either in installation, containment types, first or second fix, or have to work out diversity factors of a given installation, work from installation schematics, or any aspect of electrical maintenance, In factory's or domestic environments.

Your only and main function is to drive to location, and provide mobile power, that's it, with a few minor associated jobs on the side.

An electrician in the army does not need to know, space factors, containment instillation techniques, diversity factors, cable capacities, work out volt drop, terminate and connect large calibre SWA cables, ditto with MICC cable, and certainly does not have to adhere to the IEE Regs. Your time in the mob as a electrician will set you up for mobile power in the OB world of TV transmissions, and in the film world for location filming, which is much of a closed shop, and notoriously hard to break into, I know, I tried, with lee electric, the main and biggest film contractor.

Your time as a army electrician will help in a small way, to obtain training through the CITB scheme. Your qualifications will also help, but having the theory is no substitute for hands on experience. Something that is critical, if you wish to follow a management role in the building and construction industry.

As A qualified electrician either at the coal face, or in the office, you will be able to command top rates of pay, in excess, in my case of £50k p/y, and as a qualified electrical Engineer with a an HNC, well in excess of that.

Contact the J.I.B. for further Details. I am now retired after 50.5 years as fully qualified and experienced electrician. It takes years to learn the trade, and you never stop learning. Any tradesman who says he knows it all, is lying. END
Whilst not wishing to challenge @A signaller obvious extensive experience training in the civilian environment, this statement in red is not correct for RE ME(Elec). As the Sappers are dual trade and maintain (and practice) a construction role, ME(Elec) will have training in installation of domestics, and at Class 1 level will carry out inspections. Obviously the level of skill and specifics will not compare with a full time civvie sparky, but nevertheless the training is more construction focused that that of a R Sigs elec. Whilst the TELIC/HERRICK years might have meant a focus on "plug and play" expeditionary camp construction, prior to that, and since, the Corps is still involved in what is essentially building construction.

For the OP, who seems also to want to follow a more supervisory/design route, I would also highlight the RE Clerk of Works (Electrical) stream that undertakes design and supervision, which parallels the Professional Qualified Officer officer stream who are Chartered Electrical Engineers. The Corps also has a parallel and well developed Continuous Professional Development scheme that is specifically focused on allowing those that wish to gain qualifications. See here:


 
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Whilst not wishing to challenge @A signaller obviousl extensive experience training in the civilian environment, this statement in red is not correct for RE ME(Elec). As the Sappers are dual trade and maintain (and practice) a construction role ME(Elec) will have training in installation of domestics, and at Class 1 level will carry out inspections. Obviously the level of skill and specifics will not compare with a full time civvie sparky, but nevertheless the training is more construction focused that that of a R Sigs elec. Whilst the TELIC/HERRICK years might have meant a focus on "plug and play" expeditionary camp construction, prior to that, and since, the Corps is still involved in what is essentially building construction.

For the OP, who seems also to want to follow a more supervisory/design route, I would also highlight the RE Clerk of Works (Electrical) strea that undertakes design and supervision, which parallels the Professional Qualified Officer officer stream who are Chartered Electrical Engineers. The Corps also has a parallel and well developed Continuous Professional Development scheme that is specifically focused on allowing those that wish to gain qualifications. See here:



You are quite correct sir, I bow to your up to date knowledge , and refrain from further posting on this tread.
 

chimera

LE
Moderator
You are quite correct sir, I bow to your up to date knowledge , and refrain from further posting on this tread.
Not at all - your post is really interesting and shows the sort of skill gap that exists between the military and civvie life. Just wanted to highlight that R Sigs and RE electricans have different roles. Keep posting!
 
I must have been very fortunate to have experience of working with RE sparkies cable jointing large calibre cables,getting tug-of-war practise on BFO cable drums etc. at Long Kesh.Shame if they don't get that sort of chance anymore.
I bet they are gutted...
 

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