becoming an AI

#1
Hi I'm interested in becoming an AI but was just wondering, I was medically discharged 20 years ago while i was a junior leader and my knees are still quite bad what if any are the physical requirements to being an AI?
 
#2
The medical form sets out three broad standards, from fully fit and able to largely sedentary. If you can stand up, you can get in, but the new Assessment weekend will rule you out if the board feel you aren't capable.

It really depends how much you want to put in, and how much you want to get out. The fullest exertion you're likely to get is carrying a bergen/webbing whilst acting as a safety supervisor on an FTX. Even then, you'll probably leave your bag in a vehicle. I would expect you to be able to walk a few miles without complaint, but at the end of the day, there's roles for instructors of all shapes and sizes, and if you want to help, the ACF need assistance. If all you do is paperwork and run the NAAFI, you're still valuable despite what the shortly-arriving trolls will say.
 
#5
what about hair length i want to be an instructer but i got long hair will i need to cut it??.
Yes. Off the collar, off the ears. Facial hair frowned upon.
 
#6
Hi I'm interested in becoming an AI but was just wondering, I was medically discharged 20 years ago while i was a junior leader and my knees are still quite bad what if any are the physical requirements to being an AI?
wells , pop along to your local det, or use the 'contact' page on the ACF Website to find your local county HQ. You shuldn't have any real problems, we had a guy with a false leg complete the AI training.
 

DieHard

LE
Book Reviewer
#10
At the end of the day the only way to truly find out is to apply.
Good luck on your application the acf need instructors.
One thing though please don't join the mess dress and no2s brigade.
Having a social life within the acf is ok but I don't understand why some counties insist on people wearing mess dress to functions. After all the instructors are not soldiers and have now worked there way up the ranks to get into a sgt's mess, makes me angry that does, anyway good luck and I hope your knees hold out
 
#11
One thing though please don't join the mess dress and no2s brigade.
Having a social life within the acf is ok but I don't understand why some counties insist on people wearing mess dress to functions. After all the instructors are not soldiers and have now worked there way up the ranks to get into a sgt's mess, makes me angry that does, anyway good luck and I hope your knees hold out
I don't know of any county insisting upon it... it is usually a choice made by the individual AI. Most who do wear mess dress are either people who take it FAR too seriously, long term AIs or ex-regs/TA. The latter usually wearing the dress of Regiments long gone... which is always a talking point.
 
#12
If a county insisted on mess dress they would soon have to back track. The low turn out at the dinners would mean they would have to be cancelled. I may get mess dress if I win the lottery, but otherwise the amount of times it would get worn doesn't come close to justifying the expense.
 
#13
Hi I'm interested in becoming an AI but was just wondering, I was medically discharged 20 years ago while i was a junior leader and my knees are still quite bad what if any are the physical requirements to being an AI?
You need to be small, ugly, balding, nocturnal, with weird bony fingers and you need to be an insectivore.....



.......Ai-Ai that is!
 
#14
Hi I'm interested in becoming an AI but was just wondering, I was medically discharged 20 years ago while i was a junior leader and my knees are still quite bad what if any are the physical requirements to being an AI?
Its a civvy youth organisation, Scouts in Cammo..as stated before, no real medical requirements other than you are sane.
 
#17
There is normally a medical when you join as an AI - but its a very simple one, and there are instructors within the ACF of varying ages and physical condition, all of whom bring something to the team.
TBH if you feel you have something to give to the ACF, then you should look at joining.
Instructors do not need to be massively fit, but should be able to safely supervise the activity they are running.
The "new" process means a couple of "selection" weekends, which are basically a chance for you to see if the ACF is something you would enjoy, and the training team to see what areas you may need to look at before you go on the AITC.
 
#18
Mine would only look realistic on a Smurf. It's blue!
Nah, this one was 'sculpted' to look real.

Are yours the really gucci ones from America? Have two blue shock absorbers, self suck to the limb and can only be fitted in the US of A?
 
#19
Nah, this one was 'sculpted' to look real.

Are yours the really gucci ones from America? Have two blue shock absorbers, self suck to the limb and can only be fitted in the US of A?
Don't like the ultra real looking limbs myself, I'm of the opinion that you lose a limb then don't try to hide the fact ... nothing to be ashamed of. And they look ******* scary when you take them off and leave them lying around.

Mine doesn't have the shock absorbers, my amputation is too far down the leg to fit them in. Mines made by good ol' NHS and is a vacuum fit same as you describe.
 
#20
I met a guy through 'wounded in action' who actually made a 'shin and calf'.

His prosthetic (although I can't say why, early on, funding, medical reasons?) was proper bog standard. Looked like the same sort of ali that crutches are made from, with a sort of plastic foot on teh bottom. Length was governed by a allen key clamp.

The actual 'leg' was maybe only 1 1/2inch in diameter. He made a sort of 'calf', hinged at teh back and with clips to hold it to gether, and it sat on the foot.

Turned out eitehr he saw a picture of himself stood in the wind and he didn't like the way his leg looked so thin, trousers flappng n the wind.
 

Similar threads

Latest Threads

Top