Because 'Straya mate!

exiledblue

War Hero
In the mid 1990s while I was living down under, a Brit Veggie Tree hugger appeared in the media. She was sprouting off saying the Aussies shouldn’t be culling Skippy’s and selling the meat. What she’d failed to find out, was that the Reds and Grey Kangaroo populations could devastate crops. Especially during a drought. Also they bread like Rabbits, some of the big Mobs of Skippy’s are two or three hundred big.
Pain in the arse on golf courses - hit one and it stops ur nice drive - fuckers.

The Sturt highway past Hay u would see a few Emu's in the distance - now they have put rice paddies along it suddenly the Emus are everywhere getting the water and bugs and consequently all over the road.

7 years of living here from going oh theres an Emu over there to bugger it i nearly hit one often is a big change
 

exiledblue

War Hero
Australia is a great place to live if you are prepared to work , there are not many qualified tradesmen , most gain on the job experience, only in the last 10 years have the state govts started to promote and support apprenticeships in playing at home ,throw a sicky on monday to get over sundays hangover,finding replacements for language guides ,

one and a half million roos have to be culled yearly here in sunny dingo land, they are vermin and breed like scousers, here on the downs they are a real menace,make huge road pizzas though:p:p
Could we get that in English?
 

exiledblue

War Hero
People are suprised when they see how big the males can grow.

About 10 years ago I was at an observatory that was about an hour out of Canberra, next to one of the national parks, and a 20 min drive from what could be called the nearest town centre. Beautiful clear winters night for star gazing and no lights around apart from the quarter moon which was just enough to make out the landscape and walk around without a torch once your eyes had adjusted.

I had walked out of the observatory to take a break and get some air when a two pairs of shining eyes suddenly rose up from the ground and stared at me from about five metres away in the woodline. I'm about 5'10", these were about 6 foot of the ground.

I shit myself for a second before reaching for the torch and flicking it on to find two Eastern Greys staring at me before quitely going back to their grass meal. I just backed off an let them be.

The Eastern Greys roo's can reach about 60KG, the Red kangaroos grow even bigger.
I play golf as most have realised and they become pretty tame and used to people [not the right word), but your ball can land in a pack of them you walk up and they just look at you. The males may stand up and they are big buggers but everyone will just lie there. You have to be very careful because you have no idea if they will kick off, so shout bang something to make them move to be safe.

Of course the crows who nick your golf balls are the worst fuckers
 

exiledblue

War Hero
I'm sure 'Skippy' could have worked it out!

Poor fucker would have had to have a yellow vest a stop sign and basically become a kangaroo crossing supervisor - we cant aford them for school crossings how many should we have for kangaroos.

Actually as a piss take take the enviro vegan shit crowd on one) why don' we start a partition for kanagaroo crossing supervisiors - where there are known crossing points people will slow or stop vehicles at the appropriate times?

I bet we could get the muppits to sign up for it and get raised in parliament
 

Cutaway

LE
Kit Reviewer
You have to be very careful because you have no idea if they will kick off, so shout bang something to make them move to be safe.
If anything does kicking, just start swinging.


My brother in law lost his French Mastiff to a roo about a year ago. Roo tried to drown the dog in the farm dam, but my brother in law chased it off. It came back a week later and killed the dog with a disemboweling kick.
 
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What would an architect know about trades or engineering?
A great deal given she worked for a long time as a building project manager, doing everything from design, build schedules, hiring builders and specific trades through to oversight and responsibility for the finished job. These were generally renovation of high-end houses (think rich divorcees in RBKC).

I'll grant you, engineering isn't her strong suit, but that's what structural engineers are for.........and their PI insurance.
 
A great deal given she worked for a long time as a building project manager, doing everything from design, build schedules, hiring builders and specific trades through to oversight and responsibility for the finished job. These were generally renovation of high-end houses (think rich divorcees in RBKC).

I'll grant you, engineering isn't her strong suit, but that's what structural engineers are for.........and their PI insurance.
Decent architects round here are as rare as decent tradesmen. Very few new buildings here have any architectural merit; timber frame buildings clad with Boral cladding, a Colour Bond roof and a bit of brick veneer for a touch of “class”. It’s unusual to see an original building which is “of its place”.

Structural and civil engineers are like hens teeth. The ones that do operate can’t think beyond excavation and concrete. I’m still licensed as a CPEng but I don’t practise; the practise here aren’t good. As for project management, it’s non-existent. It takes 3-4 times as long to build here as it does in Europe.

Put bluntly, most buildings I see are badly designed, poorly built and inadequately engineered.
 
Decent architects round here are as rare as decent tradesmen. Very few new buildings here have any architectural merit; timber frame buildings clad with Boral cladding, a Colour Bond roof and a bit of brick veneer for a touch of “class”. It’s unusual to see an original building which is “of its place”.

Structural and civil engineers are like hens teeth. The ones that do operate can’t think beyond excavation and concrete. I’m still licensed as a CPEng but I don’t practise; the practise here aren’t good. As for project management, it’s non-existent. It takes 3-4 times as long to build here as it does in Europe.

Put bluntly, most buildings I see are badly designed, poorly built and inadequately engineered.
don't get me started, in domestic construction the "building work supervisors" for the project builders don't have a clue, all they do is monitor the construction so that they can put the next progress claim in asap.
 
don't get me started, in domestic construction the "building work supervisors" for the project builders don't have a clue, all they do is monitor the construction so that they can put the next progress claim in asap.
Given the sclerotic pace of most domestic construction projects here, they can’t be very busy!
 

exiledblue

War Hero
I have good friends as architects, sadly lol. but I always take the piss that they know nothing about structures etc they just talk about space.

Interestingly my brother watched a neighbour put up a new garage years ago and commented that it was made out of wood beams and columns and that they put the roof on before they put the bricks up. He said it may fall down.

I had to point out that the wood was the structural element and the bricks were a faceing and had no structural element in them. He didn't believe me, I asked why put up the wood first and he couldn't answer me. But older brothers know more :)
 
Decent architects round here are as rare as decent tradesmen. Very few new buildings here have any architectural merit; timber frame buildings clad with Boral cladding, a Colour Bond roof and a bit of brick veneer for a touch of “class”. It’s unusual to see an original building which is “of its place”.

Structural and civil engineers are like hens teeth. The ones that do operate can’t think beyond excavation and concrete. I’m still licensed as a CPEng but I don’t practise; the practise here aren’t good. As for project management, it’s non-existent. It takes 3-4 times as long to build here as it does in Europe.

Put bluntly, most buildings I see are badly designed, poorly built and inadequately engineered.
Hell, where do you live?

I guess we're lucky here, there are some great houses being built, with architectural merit by any measure. Well engineered too.

I don't venture out of the enclave much, so I guess I'm not seeing "middle Australia" too much.
 
Hell, where do you live?

I guess we're lucky here, there are some great houses being built, with architectural merit by any measure. Well engineered too.

I don't venture out of the enclave much, so I guess I'm not seeing "middle Australia" too much.
NSW Central Coast. Copacabana Beach to be precise. Highly aspirational place, packed with Sydney commuters after the North Shore lifestyle they can no longer aspire to.

There are a few great houses being built; there’s a site down the road from us with a truly spectacular copper clad house emerging. But most are simple timber framed, clad with Boral panels.
 

Yarra

Old-Salt
Decent architects round here are as rare as decent tradesmen. Very few new buildings here have any architectural merit; timber frame buildings clad with Boral cladding, a Colour Bond roof and a bit of brick veneer for a touch of “class”. It’s unusual to see an original building which is “of its place”.

Structural and civil engineers are like hens teeth. The ones that do operate can’t think beyond excavation and concrete. I’m still licensed as a CPEng but I don’t practise; the practise here aren’t good. As for project management, it’s non-existent. It takes 3-4 times as long to build here as it does in Europe.

Put bluntly, most buildings I see are badly designed, poorly built and inadequately engineered.
Watching Vic destroy much of its architectural heritage over the last 30 years makes me want to cry. East Port Bay (Mt Martha, Rosebud, Mornington and even that Bogan redoubt, Frankston) have lost so many fantastic Colonial and Californian houses. Usually demolished to be replaced by faceless Lego built Units.

There are signs that they are starting to understand built heritage in certain ‘burbs in the City. I first noticed proper renovation in Sydney ( back of the Rocks) in the early Noughties, but far too late for many fantastic old buildings.

Y
 

Grumblegrunt

LE
Book Reviewer

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