Beautifully written assessment of New Labour

#1
I have posted this because it is a near perfect assessment of what I feel towards the UK current Government.

They can't even cook their own books

New Labour's donation fiasco is pathetic. We see the big Westminster stage with a cast of insects

Oh for an evil genius, a Blofeld. Oh for a real villain, for web of wickedness, a vortex, a mastermind. Oh for a mind. Oh for a dastardly cause, or a noble cause. Oh for any cause.

For this is what so profoundly depresses in Labour's funding scandal. It's all so low grade. The characters involved are so shrivelled. “Tragic,” say the commentators. But the real tragedy is that the story fails even to rise to the level of tragedy. It's farce: a pathetic, demeaning tale of small minds, small imaginations, small stakes; a silly, twisted, inconsequential tale of paltry people hiding paltry sums of money for paltry motives.

A tale of spivvy incompetence: a big stage, and a cast of insects. Second-rate ministers flanking a third-rate Prime Minister waited upon by fourth-rate courtiers sending out the begging bowl to fifth-rate sleeve-tuggers who aren't even very rich.
At Prime Minister's Questions on Wednesday, that “Mr Bean” gibe said it all.

New Labour, it seems, can't even cook its own books. They can't even co-ordinate a cover-up. They failed to find out fast enough what it was they had to cover up, failed to take the elementary precaution of reconciling their excuses, and failed to square their alibis. Talk of a piss-up in a brewery ? this lot couldn't organise a scam in an amusement arcade.

There's space this morning ? if you will indulge a moment's pure cynicism ? for a modest expression of professional regret that our Government has proved a flop even at cheating. Turn in your grave, Horatio Bottomley. Blush, Robert Maxwell. Standards have slipped. Top-notch fraudsters up and down the country must be wincing at the sheer incompetence. Labour has brought disgrace on self-respecting hustlers everywhere.

Were I a senior Labour politician this weekend, much of the shame I'd feel would be because people in my party had behaved like crooks; but a little, secret bit of it would be because they've proved such incompetent crooks. We're not talking the Old Bailey here; not even Crown Court. We're talking Woking Magistrates' Court on a wet winter Tuesday; a shuffling line of dysfunctional miscreants in soiled shell-suits, struggling to read the oath, let alone to understand the charges against them.

We have a party leader incapable even of colluding with his own deputy. We have a Prime Minister so pathetically anxious to elbow blame on to his colleagues that in the first five minutes of the story breaking he volunteers ? volunteers ? the opinion that what has happened is “unlawful”, thus permanently settling the argument about whether it should be a matter for the police.

We see a chief fundraiser prominent in the Labour Friends of Israel who has made an apparently personal donation to the most pro-Palestinian of all the candidates for the deputy leadership. Unveiled too is a Mr Big so not big that he struggles to find halfway credible launderers for his secret donations. Hissed from the stage, as much in pity as anger, is a Labour general secretary who claims to have forgotten ? or never understood ? the simplest rules in the new legislation it is his job to implement.

Where do they find these people? What possessed Gordon Brown to declare, before he had the least reason to know it to be true, that there was one individual alone, Labour's general secretary, who knew about the fake donors ? just as the media began unearthing all the others, and, as I write, are still unearthing? Didn't that great strategist, that colossus of a political intellect, pause for a moment to wonder whether there might be more to come out?

The root, I suspect, of Mr Brown's peremptory and careless handling of this story lies in his fathomless resentment of Tony Blair. The rest of the country may find it hard to believe that the present Prime Minister has nothing to do with the decade commanded by his predecessor, but I think Mr Brown really has convinced himself that he is not implicated. In this he is, I think, weirdly, sincere.

Somewhere in this strange mind has arisen an idea so palpably absurd when articulated that he has never articulated it, maybe even to himself: but it drives the way he feels about the past. It is the idea that he was somehow not there, or not completely there, from 1997 to 2007: just a sort of hostage, mute witness to a decade he neither willed nor bears responsibility for. To such an imagination, the stink of rotten fish left by his predecessor beneath the sofa cushions at Downing Street can be greeted almost triumphantly, vindicating rather than indicting him.

But for what noble end does Mr Brown's Government exist? Where are those great missions in whose cause big men grow impatient of the proprieties? It isn't, in the end, the lying and cheating I cannot forgive. It is the lying and cheating to no purpose beyond daily, weekly survival. When seized with some urgent national purpose, we may all be tempted to take short cuts. But Brown's people are cutting corners with nowhere to go. That is the real tragedy.
In full

http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/comment/columnists/matthew_parris/article2980338.ece
 
#3
Oh so true!

In new liarbore today,the cabinet cannot rise above class 1 oxygen theives.

May this evil government collapse into it's own manure and soon.
 
#4
Prose sheer prose, having worked the courts many years ago, I liken it to a thief who stole one shoe (and that was not his size) asked why he just said "dunno", pointless just like this goverment, just sad and pointless.....feel pity not anger this morning, we have so got to change how we do things in the country....
 
#6
Excellent.

It really drives home the fact that under Liarbour this country has become a 3rd World Banana Republic in the money grabbing, sleazy, corruption stakes. Sadly under bollockeye brown we will slide further down into the cesspit.
 
#7
Brilliant stuff, strike right to the very core of the Labia Party.

"In the name of God, GO!, you have sat there long enough for any good you may have done". (Oliver Cromwell to the Government of the day)
 

Biped

LE
Book Reviewer
#8
Well, that's cheered my morning up. Excellent.
 
#10
Hit the nail right on the head about taking shortcuts but going nowhere.

Although I confess I was expecting the article to simply read, "A bunch of cnuts".
 
#11
smartascarrots said:
Hit the nail right on the head about taking shortcuts but going nowhere.

Although I confess I was expecting the article to simply read, "A bunch of cnuts".
I think "A bunch of cnuts" goes straight to the point :D
 
#12
exile1 said:
I was feeling quite ill [hungover] this morning until I read that wonderful catharsis.
Seconded - how emabarrssed am I to be British today - and a sweaty to boot :oops:
 
#15
Well expressed.
Now if we could only clear out the lot from ALL parties and start again.
Raggedy's quote was right on the button,- bring back Ollie.

Edit 4 spelling.
 
#16
Unusually vituperative for Parris; he is normally milder than a mild thing when rebuking folk or making a point about policy. Even the Neu Arbeit apologist Toynbee hasn't written anything flattering. Clearly some people have forgotten the canard that when you become the story it's time to collect the P45. How long before the knives are out for Gordy? More worryingly, who would replace him? The only senior Liabour type I have any time for is Meacher; a bit of a lefty, but at least he's honest about it. The others are a waste of oxygen.
 
#17
deSTABlised - left-of field answer? John Reid.

Knows he's the only credible big hitter with any experience and, having decided he couldn't possibly work with Broon, is untainted by any association with any of the current disasters. Young enough - just - to be Gordon's successor, but not so young as to prevent Milliband, or Johnson or Bulging Eye-Balls from becoming leader in a few years therefore acceptable to all of them as a Broon replacement.

And I supect Reid would love being begged to rescind his decision to retire at the next election so that he could rescue the Labour party from itself. He'd regret giving up being chairman of Celtic, but I suspect the prospect of being PM or even just the party leader who sorted out the mess left by Broon might persuade him otherwise...

Not going to happen of course, not least since I doubt anyone prominent in the Labour party is (a) brave enough to bring Broon down (b) sufficiently able to put forward thinking ahead of self-interest to see that Reid would be a short-term investment and thus not an obstacle to them taking over within a few years, (c) sensible enough to realise that as Reid is rather more dynamic than Ming Campbell, his age isn't such an issue.
 
#18
deSTABlised said:
Unusually vituperative for Parris; he is normally milder than a mild thing when rebuking folk or making a point about policy. Even the Neu Arbeit apologist Toynbee hasn't written anything flattering. Clearly some people have forgotten the canard that when you become the story it's time to collect the P45. How long before the knives are out for Gordy? More worryingly, who would replace him? The only senior Liabour type I have any time for is Meacher; a bit of a lefty, but at least he's honest about it. The others are a waste of oxygen.
I find it interesting that the comedians have started having a pop at Gordon Brown. Generally, I felt that they had left GB alone and had concentrated their fire on TB. Now, post the Cable Commons put-down, they seem to have agreed that it is open season. The Now Show on R4 had a go earlier today and a BBC1 show was also quite cutting.

Once ridiculed, politicians tned not to hang on for very long. Have we just seen the political turning point for Gordon Brown?

Litotes
 
#19
Litotes said:
Once ridiculed, politicians tend not to hang on for very long.Litotes
???? What about Maggie, or the late, unlamented Tony? Both savagely lampooned for the best part of a decade each and still went kicking and screaming.

We could (God help us) still be in for a long haul.
 
#20
brewmeister said:
Litotes said:
Once ridiculed, politicians tend not to hang on for very long.Litotes
???? What about Maggie, or the late, unlamented Tony? Both savagely lampooned for the best part of a decade each and still went kicking and screaming.

We could (God help us) still be in for a long haul.
Nah, the knives only came out for Maggie after the '87 election; before that noone dared to challenge her. It took until 1990 for Tarzan to find his balls and stand up. Tony only started taking serious flak within the party after GW2 and the whole WMD nonsense. If Gordy has another policy or skeleton-in-closet catastrophe within the next 6 months, he's toast. The bumcovering by the backbenchers will be something to behold if it happens.

The main problem with Dr. Reid is that most Liabour MPs seem to hate him. He does appear competent enough to do the job, though.
 

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