Beaufighter found on the beach

A lookout on the Bridge of a Corvette in the Atlantic, called out 'Enemy Aircraft overhead Sir' 'Good God cried the Captain, this ship need to bloody wake up! It's a Beaufighter for gods sake, note the Fat Fuselage and twin fins. Wake up Man!!!"
A short pause and then the Look out called out ...'Stick of Bombs on the way down Sir!"
it was a Beaufighter then. RAF were good at that. Especially with our submarines.
 
Beaufighter fought from 1940 to 45 and then on until about 1960 as a target tug. Tough plane with a tough reputation. we sold some after the war to Portugal. Despite RAF instructors on conversion courses they hardly flew as they frightened the cack out of them. Protruding pinkie ladyboys.
 
In Guy Gibson’s book Enemy Coast Ahead he talks about the high loss rate of Beaufighter crews on training sorties and in landing incidents caused by some of its handling quirks.

He follows this up with a fantastic anecdote - while pacing the apron with a colleague waiting for impenetrable fog to clear, he hears the unmistakable sound of a Beaufighter approaching. After hearing it make a couple of invisible passes, the hear it come back for a third try and brace themselves for the inevitable impact. Instead the pair of them are amazed to hear it land, and when it taxis up to where they’re standing they wait to congratulate the pilot on his display of airmanship. Imagine their surprise when a cheerful young woman from the ATA hops out and asks them where she needs to book in.
 
at 2.20 a Lightning is shown with its nosewheel down.

And at least one war crime recorded on film...machine-gunning shipwrecked crew in boats!
Japanese?
 

SecurityGeek

Old-Salt
at 2.20 a Lightning is shown with its nosewheel down.

And at least one war crime recorded on film...machine-gunning shipwrecked crew in boats!
War crime? Ship wrecked crew or enemy combatants within reach of land?
Nice piece of revisionist thought process there. The Japs were not renowned for giving up.
Jap infantry, if it got ashore, would have attempted to fight. Lets also not forget the previous Jap atrocities that would have been at the back of the minds of those aircrew. Dead Jap = Good Jap was the mindset then brought about from bitter experience.
 
War crime? Ship wrecked crew or enemy combatants within reach of land?
Nice piece of revisionist thought process there. The Japs were not renowned for giving up.
Jap infantry, if it got ashore, would have attempted to fight. Lets also not forget the previous Jap atrocities that would have been at the back of the minds of those aircrew. Dead Jap = Good Jap was the mindset then brought about from bitter experience.
I'm not judging. It was a war crime then as it is now.
 
it was a Beaufighter then. RAF were good at that. Especially with our submarines.
If it was one of ours then the twin fins would probably make it a Hudson.
 
If it was one of ours then the twin fins would probably make it a Hudson.
Or another of Lockheed's products, the Ventura, nicknamed 'the pig' by the RAF.
 

Bodenplatte

War Hero
Used to be Beaufighter wreckage in a pit by the side of the runway at Ras al Hadd airstrip. It's probably all been moved for purposes of tourist development now . . . . . sad, sad.

One of the engines was at the museum at Bait-al-Falaj.

There was also an airship mooring mast at al Hadd too, intended for the proposed England-India route. I hope that hasn't been dismantled. The plans to open up an airship service to India went up the Suwanee with the R101 crash.
 

GreyArea

War Hero
A lookout on the Bridge of a Corvette in the Atlantic, called out 'Enemy Aircraft overhead Sir' 'Good God cried the Captain, this ship need to bloody wake up! It's a Beaufighter for gods sake, note the Fat Fuselage and twin fins. Wake up Man!!!"
A short pause and then the Look out called out ...'Stick of Bombs on the way down Sir!"

Nicholas Monsarrat walt


:-D:-D
 

Chef

LE
trigger's broom stuff, a lot of the time.

I know there's a few Lockheed Lightnings found on South West Pacific islands, which were rebuilt around a manufacturer's plate and a few levers.
I think the aviation requirements differ depending on whether it's a restoration or a replica. There's certainly been debates on how much original aircraft is required to be called a restoration as opposed to a replica.

If you restored a Sopwith Camel you could use a rotary engine. i doubt you'd be able to do that with a replica no matter how 'authentic' it is.
 

overopensights

ADC
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