Beamish Open Air Museum - What a rip off!

#21
I rather liked the refreshments stalls around Beamish which used words like temperence - is that phrase to mean 'abstaining from alcohol'?
 
#22
rockhoppercrab said:
Hate to rub it in, Museum of Welsh whatever at St Fagans is free to get into, as are many other attractions in the principality thanks to the wasters in the Assembly.
Main exhibits include - Coal, Sheep, Leeks...................er thats it really!
 
#24
BedIn - come on - you must have been to the Farne Islands and to see some old parp about Bede in Jarrow? How about the Hancock Museum as well?

Mind you - Vindolanda & Housteads are officially the most boring piles of stones in the Northern hemisphere!
 
#25
Not Bank Holiday, but looking to Spend New Years Eve at Disneyland Paris, cost of a 3 Nights, 2 Days package for me, the Woman and her Sprog, £1500.

Booked it all myself, for the Woman, Sprog, me, her sister and sister's chap (Ex Navy, but you can't have them all) less than £500. That's the Ferry, 3 nights in hotel, Tickets to DLP on New Year's Eve, Petrol and tolls. The only draw back is the 900 odd mile cabby in 3 days.

Major Rip Off.
 
#26
FredWest said:
Not Bank Holiday, but looking to Spend New Years Eve at Disneyland Paris, cost of a 3 Nights, 2 Days package for me, the Woman and her Sprog, £1500.

Booked it all myself, for the Woman, Sprog, me, her sister and sister's chap (Ex Navy, but you can't have them all) less than £500. That's the Ferry, 3 nights in hotel, Tickets to DLP on New Year's Eve, Petrol and tolls. The only draw back is the 900 odd mile cabby in 3 days.

Major Rip Off.
Now Disney are the ultimate robbing tw@ts aren't they? One look at Goofy smiling at you because he knows you've been well done and you're just going to pound the little French f@cker - am I right Fred?
 
#27
Hinecap - Ah, you clearly shared the same youth as me. Driving rain in a boat to the Farnes, driving rain at Houseteads, being terrified of the unwrapped mummy in the Hancock museum, etc. All rounded off with a whip-round and three cheers for the driver.
 
#28
I've never been to Beamish yet Cutsy, but the admission fees sound quite reasonable to me considering what other attractions cost, loads of people have told me its a great day out.

By the way Cuts, did anyone get in touch with you regarding being an 'extra' for Atonement? I sent an application off but never heard anything. :(
 
#30
Well chaps I know its a fairly old thread, so a little update, since I last posted, I finally went to Beamish this week and felt really underwhelmed and wish I hadn't gone, it's over priced for what it offers at £16, I think Black Country museum was better than Beamish and doesn't cost as much, can't say I was impressed with Beamish everything is spread out, it felt a little sterile.

I have heard Blist Hill museum at Ironbridge is quite good, so will have a look at that next time.
 
#32
Sorry to read that. I've always been fairly happy with the place - but it is a place that you need good weather for and allow plenty of time to see everything, rather than gloss over it. Maybe I'm biased because there's a lot there that was still current when I was a kid in the 60's.

The school is like a single-storey version of the junior school I used to attend - we also had the same desks, chairs and writing slates (though we used chalk, rather than lead). The shops were also similar as were the houses. Not much seemed to have changed between 1913 and 1965. So, for me, it's a place of nostalgia, rather than history.

As regards the price, it's a while since I was last there, but they had a system where if you had proof of residence in the north-east, you received a substantial discount. Don't know if that's still the case. (I'd moved away about 20 years earlier, but took my parents' electric bill with me). Last time I went, I took my Dad - while they were fiddling about finding him a wheelchair, they forgot to charge the admission. Cheap day out. :)
 

jim24

LE
Book Reviewer
#33
Rain at Auvers

In May 1890 Van Gogh moved from Arles in Provence to the village of Auvers-sur-Oise, north of Paris. There he lodged at the Café Ravoux and received treatment from Dr Paul-Ferdinand Gachet. Between 17 June and 27 July, Van Gogh painted thirteen double-square canvases of the gardens and fields around Auvers. In his last letter he expressed himself 'quite absorbed in the immense plain with wheat fields against the hills, boundless as a sea, delicate yellow, delicate soft green, the delicate violet of a dug-up and weeded piece of soil'. His treatment of the rain as diagonal strokes derives from the woodcut Bridge in the Rain by the Japanese artist Hiroshige, which the artist had copied in 1887. The atmosphere recalls one of Van Gogh's favourite poems, Longfellow's The Rainy Day 'My life is cold, and dark, and dreary; It rains, and the wind is never weary...Into each life some rain must fall, Some days must be dark and dreary.'

Van Gogh shot himself and died on 29 July 1890, shortly after painting this work. It was purchased by Gwendoline Davies at Paris in 1920.
Funny what you can see in the FREE museums in Cardiff
 

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#34
I don't think you can quite compare Beamish to the Cardiff National Museum. Beamish (as well as being a privately-run theme-park affair) is very much "hands on", Cardiff's National Museum is very much "hands off".

OK the National Museum has some expensive paintings and other still things, but Beamish has a drift mine, operating buses, fairground, live animals and a pub.
 
#37
Sorry to read that. I've always been fairly happy with the place - but it is a place that you need good weather for and allow plenty of time to see everything, rather than gloss over it. Maybe I'm biased because there's a lot there that was still current when I was a kid in the 60's.

The school is like a single-storey version of the junior school I used to attend - we also had the same desks, chairs and writing slates (though we used chalk, rather than lead). The shops were also similar as were the houses. Not much seemed to have changed between 1913 and 1965. So, for me, it's a place of nostalgia, rather than history.

As regards the price, it's a while since I was last there, but they had a system where if you had proof of residence in the north-east, you received a substantial discount. Don't know if that's still the case. (I'd moved away about 20 years earlier, but took my parents' electric bill with me). Last time I went, I took my Dad - while they were fiddling about finding him a wheelchair, they forgot to charge the admission. Cheap day out. :)
Out of interest, have you been to the Black Country museum ? perhaps you could compare and would be interested in your viewpoint, I must admit the school house is a lot better than BCM, everything else is similar to what you get at the BCM, except trolleybuses.

I think what let Beamish down is everything is far apart, no interesting walkways to link them up, the Town is a bit on the small side and slightly sanitised, the staff on the whole seem ok, yet they seem to lack enthusiasm for their role, the Pockerly trackways is interesting, I feel the tracks could be longer to demonstrate the potential of the engine.

BCM is more condensed, the Town is bigger and more organic, there is more to see, the staff seemed fairly enthusiastic in role, they have a Trollybus and Trams service, no Trains, they have quite few displays and demonstrations compared to Beamish, my only bugbear is you have to pay for parking.

For the money I reckon BCM offers better value for money, £13.50 Beamish £16, (in your case ...free !)
I still have the 12 months pass, so if I am in the area visiting National Trust and English Heritage properties, (I'm a member of both),I will drop in, but won't go out of my way to go there.
 
#38
29 August 2006:

Decided to take my family there yesterday for a little Bank Holiday jaunt and I think I should have turned round at the admission gate. Why? £16.50 for adults, £10.00 for kids - that is just pure bloody extortion isn't it?
30 August 2011:

Well chaps I know its a fairly old thread, so a little update, since I last posted, I finally went to Beamish this week and felt really underwhelmed and wish I hadn't gone, it's over priced for what it offers at £16.
If I am reading this right, I'd say that I agree with both; it's greedy, no doubt. It'd cost me, the missus and kids £60+. Having said that, the tickets allow you return visits for 12 months, so if you're able to use that facility it looks like it might make sense (presuming it's good enough to visit more than once (child's perspective being important here)). I notice also that the prices in 2006 and 2011 are about the same - remarkable? I find it difficult to believe that 5 years could elapse in this country without some "creative" "marketing" "type" dreaming up a fresh way to stick another one up my ********; it makes me wonder what's going on there...
 
#39
@semper: The thing about Beamish is that it's constantly evolving. When I first went, there was the town, the school, two buses, a signal box, 50 yards of track and a railway carriage - so everything was closely grouped but a long way from the entrance. As you'll have noticed, quite a bit more has been added - and there's still space to add more without it being cluttered. Visiting more than once a year? Maybe not to see the attractions, but it's a nice place for picnicing or lazing in the sun.

It's fair to say that locals will get the best vallue from it, but few Brits seem to be interested in what Britain can offer and most overseas tourists think that Britain doesn't extend beyond the hell-hole of London. So, if you compare prices against London attractions(!), it's far from a rip-off. (I can't, for the life of me, understand why anybody would rave about absolute tat in a darkened railway arch - London Dungeons, £23.52, must be the most expensive Ghost Train in the country).

I haven't been to the Black Country Museum. Thanks for mentioning it - I'll add it to the places to visit.
 
#40
Not Bank Holiday, but looking to Spend New Years Eve at Disneyland Paris, cost of a 3 Nights, 2 Days package for me, the Woman and her Sprog, £1500.

Booked it all myself, for the Woman, Sprog, me, her sister and sister's chap (Ex Navy, but you can't have them all) less than £500. That's the Ferry, 3 nights in hotel, Tickets to DLP on New Year's Eve, Petrol and tolls. The only draw back is the 900 odd mile cabby in 3 days.

Major Rip Off.
my charming little sproglet burst into the bedroom a week ago singing some ditty about having a golden ticket. Now i was in middle of a long run of nights and none too pleased at having my slumber broken.

It transpired that we had won a trip to disneyland paris for four with park tickets included.

Great thinks I-- a free holiday !!!!! but noooooooooo you have to get there yourself and eating there is hugely pricey too.

Now I was just about to bung it on ebay --where they sell for 400 quid when the guilt set in.

So the week before christmas I will be waiting 90 minutes in sub zero temps for 3 minutes on a roller coaster --and i shall have to look as if i am loving it.

Then some smug twat in a mickey suit will mug me of more of my hard earned for a burger your local van would be ashamed to dish up.

It will however bestow superdaddy status upon me and allow me to continue necking tramp juice and watching sport on the telly when i should be doing things about the house.

Yes I have been pussywhipped that bad
 

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