BCB "Mistral" - Body Armour Cooling?

#1
The Mistral Body Cooling System

This was an interesting concept and apparently gives a lot of benefits for just an extra 300g in weight, bearing in mind it runs off batteries, the main benefit apparently comes from the “cooling” properties of the piece of kit itself, it doesn’t seem a standalone product and apparently is integrated into ballistic solutions that are already or have been issued like Osprey.
I’m quite surprised these haven’t been trialled by the MOD, if it works as well as the way it describes it may have been beneficial to have it implemented for a trial in the Virtus system, maybe it has been considered for a tender but I could be incorrect, what can be wrong with something that stops you more or less sweating like a beast anymore than you should?

CA067.jpg


BCB International, a long established designer and manufacturer of quality survival & protective equipment launches its latest essential piece of equipment for hot weather climate”
“BCB’s innovators have devised a major leap forward in under-armour body cooling. The Mistral is designed to be integrated with the body armour or can be worn as a separate garment underneath. The ‘Mistral’ has channels that blow cool air upwards from the small, battery powered motor and then outwards, away from the wearer. This enables a wicking undershirt to keep up with the evaporation of sweat from the body surface and has the secondary effect of also reducing core body temperature. The design improves on existing systems that are limited by weight or offer poor performance and it includes a system that ‘feels’ cool continuously as well as being robust, simple and reliable.

The specially designed system can be integrated into all types of body armour including Osprey, Kestrel and Interceptor.

The Mistral offers high performance compared with existing blown-air systems giving significant reduction in heat stress and thermal burden thereby increasing the physical capability of troops by improving combat
performance and concentration.


A little further digging into BCB it is actually seemingly now available as a revised design available which is now adding a minimum of 1.3kg (without ballistic protection further added).

MISTRAL (CENTURY COOLING VEST)
CA027.jpg


This seems a standalone product thats simply is slipped under the ballistic vest rather than being implemented into the existing solution like the previous version/design

Specifications
  • Does not compromise on ballistic performance
  • Does not impede use of webbing and load carriage vests
  • Improves combat performance and concentration
  • Improves morale
  • Total weight of vest, fan and batteries @ 1.3kg (2.8lbs)
  • Can be used as a stand alone vest in any hot environment e.g. vehicles, kitchens, on sentry duty etc
  • Separate vest – one size fits all.
If it improves the overall performing an Infantry soldier in a fast faced moving environment with all the existing kit, could the cost to benefit ratio justify the MOD further expense to invest in seeing if this would really improve the performance of an infantry platoon?

The MOD has invested and wasted millions on retarded crap and this apparently is available as a tender from an official MOD contractor which deals on an international basis.
 
#2
what happens when the body armour it's under/built into takes a blow?
I bet those buckles on the side won't be nice under Osprey if it's been worn as an addition rather than built into the body armour.

how much noise from the fan? how long to the batteries last?
 
#4
It would break and the batteries would create a logistical challenge.
Plus when the "operators" are playing cod, the fans will start running like a spaniel.
 
#5
what happens when the body armour it's under/built into takes a blow?
I bet those buckles on the side won't be nice under Osprey if it's been worn as an addition rather than built into the body armour.

how much noise from the fan? how long to the batteries last?
I'm guessing it doesn't sound like a hair dryer and as for estimates of the battery length... totally... no... idea, I'm guessing it's designed best intended purpose would be for those in the front line role of Infantry and as for long term engagements changing batteries would be a pain in the arrse, I remember asking my mates if they had some AA's for my walkman back in school
 
#6
So a fan that blows hot air and dust from the outside to the inside creating an asthmatic wheeze of hot dusty air? Cool. Or rather not.

1.3kg. That's another couple of mags or a litre plus of oggin right?
 
#7
So a fan that blows hot air and dust from the outside to the inside creating an asthmatic wheeze of hot dusty air? Cool. Or rather not.

1.3kg. That's another couple of mags or a litre plus of oggin right?
I have a feeling the system generates the cooling from inside rather than the exterior
 
#8
Wow - this is amazing. I've seen loads of army's around the world use cooling systems like this.

Oh wait. I haven't because it's shit and has been trialled.
 
#9
Wow - this is amazing. I've seen loads of army's around the world use cooling systems like this.

Oh wait. I haven't because it's shit and has been trialled.
Exoskeleton?
 
#10
Wow - this is amazing. I've seen loads of army's around the world use cooling systems like this.

Oh wait. I haven't because it's shit and has been trialled.
It doesn't mean the idea behind it is shit though.
 
#12
This 'technology' isn't new. It's been around for at least 5 years. Probably more.

Still not used by anyone...
I've labs using it.
 
#14
D

Deleted 20555

Guest
#17
I wonder if anyone will ever be able to do a study to see the effects on soldiers of carrying excessive weight due to body armour and long term injuries that may occur vs the protection offered and the chance of combat injuries due to exhaustion and lack of mobility.
 
#18
#19
I wonder if anyone will ever be able to do a study to see the effects on soldiers of carrying excessive weight due to body armour and long term injuries that may occur vs the protection offered and the chance of combat injuries due to exhaustion and lack of mobility.
Long Form: 'Don't be daft, nobody ever does any analysis of kit or even trials it with units in the field or on ops. Soldiers just get crap kit imposed upon them by evil people who want to kill them.

Meanwhile, in the real, imperfect, world, loads of people try and do the best they can in imperfect circumstances to adapt to ever changing threats and circumstances, led by often immature customer requirements that are driven by hugely complex operational environments.'


Short Form: - 'Yes, but you might not be privy to the results and the ongoing analysis and therefore might assume zero progress'.
 
#20

Similar threads


Latest Threads

Top