BBC supporting iRA?

RBMK

LE
Book Reviewer
I have used the search function and could not find any mention of this:


Herewith the transcript:


Full transcript of Aíne McCann's interview on BBC Radio 4's Today

PRESENTER: 'Joe McCann was 24 when was shot dead in Belfast in 1972, allegedly by a group of three soldiers. At the time a police investigation failed to result in a prosecution, and nearly 50 years on the trial of two former soldiers collapsed yesterday, sparking starkly different reactions across Northern Ireland's political divide. Joe McCann's daughter Aíne was three when he was killed, and she joins us now. Good morning.'

AINE MCCANN: 'Good morning.'

'What do you remember of that time and the death of your father? '

'Well, surprisingly, given my age, I remember actually quite a lot. I remember his body lying in the coffin in the living room.

'Lots of people in the house, family sitting around in the living room, I remember trying to give him some sweets, a bag of sweets. I remember my aunt lifting me up to the coffin, I caught him by the nose and I said 'wake up daddy, wake up', because as far as I was concerned he was asleep, and as the mind of a three-year-old goes, it's not strange or bizarre that he was lying asleep in a wooden box in the middle of the room surrounded by his family or a lot of other people. And I remember my great-grandmother remarking to other people 'God help her, she doesn't know what's going on.'

'We didn't attend my father's funeral because we were taken away, myself and my sister, to stay with our pre-school teachers, and I remember all of that, getting put to bed at night, that night in their house, and getting up and coming down the stairs, and saying to herself and her husband: 'I want to go home to my mummy and daddy, where's my mummy and daddy?' And then I was put back up into bed. So people often think that, you know, it's often been remarked, actually you were very young at that time and you wouldn't really remember it, you know, but...'

'But you do.'

'Absolutely.'

'Can you accept nearly 50 years on that when it came to this trial there were deficiencies? There was no new evidence, and there was a lack of interviewing under caution.'

'Absolutely, the cards were stacked against this case from the very beginning when there was an illegal arrangement between the Attorney General and the General Officer commanding the British Army at the time to deliberately not prosecute in these cases and to make sure that the initial investigations were carried out, that you would have included that they were brought to the RUC and questioned under caution by the RUC.

'That didn't happen, it was described as a tea and sandwiches affair, so it meant that the RMP, the Royal Military Police, instead carried out that investigation. So when that illegal arrangement was lifted, the case still was not reinvestigated after that, and it should have been after then in 1974, so we have a litany of deliberate oversight, professional malpractice, corruption and collusion at all levels of the British Government, right from that time and right up to and including the disgraced and defunct Historical Enquiries Team who were disbanded by the Police Constable here, Chief Constable.'

'But the circumstances at the time, and the personal circumstances of your father – it was accepted in court that he was a commander in the Official IRA and it was also said in court that he was thought to have been involved in the deaths of 15 soldiers.'

'Well, I can tell you that you can get away with defaming people in a court of law, and not be held to account for it, and when the family had to sit there and listen to those ridiculous accusations, and that's all I can say that they are…'

'But he was in the Official IRA? Your mother spoke about that at the time, of her pride in that.'

'Absolutely, yes absolutely. But to say that he went riot and he shot 15 soldiers, he must have been all over the place, do you know what I mean? Because there was… no British soldiers were actually shot in the North of Ireland until 1971. And between that time, 1971, and then until the death of my father, a total of 30 soldiers were shot in Belfast, so according to them... I'll tell you what way it was, first of all it started out with one soldier, then it started out with a possible assassination on a politician, then all of a sudden, you know, there's 15, there's 11, there's 15, there's 19 – I don't know, where's the evidence for this? Nowhere.'

'So where does this leave you, Aíne? Do you think that… are there other options that you can pursue?'

'Absolutely, and we are going to have a take at those options now, and that includes going for… an inquest.'

'OK. Aíne McCann, thank you very much for talking to us.'



Well up to the usual BBC wokeness crap journalism standards that the ***** that is Aine McCann wasn't challenged about the killing of 15 British soldiers during The Troubles.
 
Its hardly supporting the IRA; bear in mind they have a duty to show both sides of the story, as vile and reprehensible as the other side was / is.
 
I have used the search function and could not find any mention of this:


Herewith the transcript:


Full transcript of Aíne McCann's interview on BBC Radio 4's Today

PRESENTER: 'Joe McCann was 24 when was shot dead in Belfast in 1972, allegedly by a group of three soldiers. At the time a police investigation failed to result in a prosecution, and nearly 50 years on the trial of two former soldiers collapsed yesterday, sparking starkly different reactions across Northern Ireland's political divide. Joe McCann's daughter Aíne was three when he was killed, and she joins us now. Good morning.'

AINE MCCANN: 'Good morning.'

'What do you remember of that time and the death of your father? '

'Well, surprisingly, given my age, I remember actually quite a lot. I remember his body lying in the coffin in the living room.

'Lots of people in the house, family sitting around in the living room, I remember trying to give him some sweets, a bag of sweets. I remember my aunt lifting me up to the coffin, I caught him by the nose and I said 'wake up daddy, wake up', because as far as I was concerned he was asleep, and as the mind of a three-year-old goes, it's not strange or bizarre that he was lying asleep in a wooden box in the middle of the room surrounded by his family or a lot of other people. And I remember my great-grandmother remarking to other people 'God help her, she doesn't know what's going on.'

'We didn't attend my father's funeral because we were taken away, myself and my sister, to stay with our pre-school teachers, and I remember all of that, getting put to bed at night, that night in their house, and getting up and coming down the stairs, and saying to herself and her husband: 'I want to go home to my mummy and daddy, where's my mummy and daddy?' And then I was put back up into bed. So people often think that, you know, it's often been remarked, actually you were very young at that time and you wouldn't really remember it, you know, but...'

'But you do.'

'Absolutely.'

'Can you accept nearly 50 years on that when it came to this trial there were deficiencies? There was no new evidence, and there was a lack of interviewing under caution.'

'Absolutely, the cards were stacked against this case from the very beginning when there was an illegal arrangement between the Attorney General and the General Officer commanding the British Army at the time to deliberately not prosecute in these cases and to make sure that the initial investigations were carried out, that you would have included that they were brought to the RUC and questioned under caution by the RUC.

'That didn't happen, it was described as a tea and sandwiches affair, so it meant that the RMP, the Royal Military Police, instead carried out that investigation. So when that illegal arrangement was lifted, the case still was not reinvestigated after that, and it should have been after then in 1974, so we have a litany of deliberate oversight, professional malpractice, corruption and collusion at all levels of the British Government, right from that time and right up to and including the disgraced and defunct Historical Enquiries Team who were disbanded by the Police Constable here, Chief Constable.'

'But the circumstances at the time, and the personal circumstances of your father – it was accepted in court that he was a commander in the Official IRA and it was also said in court that he was thought to have been involved in the deaths of 15 soldiers.'

'Well, I can tell you that you can get away with defaming people in a court of law, and not be held to account for it, and when the family had to sit there and listen to those ridiculous accusations, and that's all I can say that they are…'

'But he was in the Official IRA? Your mother spoke about that at the time, of her pride in that.'

'Absolutely, yes absolutely. But to say that he went riot and he shot 15 soldiers, he must have been all over the place, do you know what I mean? Because there was… no British soldiers were actually shot in the North of Ireland until 1971. And between that time, 1971, and then until the death of my father, a total of 30 soldiers were shot in Belfast, so according to them... I'll tell you what way it was, first of all it started out with one soldier, then it started out with a possible assassination on a politician, then all of a sudden, you know, there's 15, there's 11, there's 15, there's 19 – I don't know, where's the evidence for this? Nowhere.'

'So where does this leave you, Aíne? Do you think that… are there other options that you can pursue?'

'Absolutely, and we are going to have a take at those options now, and that includes going for… an inquest.'

'OK. Aíne McCann, thank you very much for talking to us.'



Well up to the usual BBC wokeness crap journalism standards that the ***** that is Aine McCann wasn't challenged about the killing of 15 British soldiers during The Troubles.
I wish I could remember things from when I was three years old
 
The look one has when they realise there isn't any compensation coming their way.

ScreenHunter_01 May. 05 16.00.gif
 
Her brother Fergus looks like he was starved of oxygen at a crucial point of his development, either that or he was dropped on his head a fair bit when a young un.......
 

ancienturion

LE
Book Reviewer
I thought that this comment explained it all quite well.

there was a “strong indication” of a “desire to use the criminal justice system to settle old scores” by charging Soldiers A and C with murder.
 
The complete denial of the consequences of his actions having anything to do with his death by his family, is simply indicative of the actions of a community in the North, who feel that any ends justifies the methods they operate by.
 
I wish I could remember things from when I was three years old

I dare say that she was told what happened, what people said and what she did. Forty nine years later she has repeated it so many times she believes it is her memory.
 

RBMK

LE
Book Reviewer
What annoyed me most was the interviewer's lack of any challenger to her assertions and the blind acceptance of her biased description as "fact".
 

Joker62

ADC
Book Reviewer
It's not helped when certain pillars of society retweet stuff either, namely one Diane Abbott!
 

ancienturion

LE
Book Reviewer
It's not helped when certain pillars of society retweet stuff either, namely one Diane Abbott!

Interesting to note that Americans still think of terrorists as freedom fighters providing an Irish family name can be grubbed up from somewhere.
 
Representative Kevin J. Boyle was banging on about Jimmy Sands as well. However, the Shinners have gone off him a bit since they discovered he and his brother are pro-Israel.
 
Representative Kevin J. Boyle was banging on about Jimmy Sands as well. However, the Shinners have gone off him a bit since they discovered he and his brother are pro-Israel.
I had a rattle at him on twitter.

Another Yank, who thinks they understand the NI conflict and Irish history, because they read the Guinness edition of the Mr Men books and his Great Great Cousin, 6 times removed was an Irish immigrant.
 
It's not helped when certain pillars of society retweet stuff either, namely one Diane Abbott!
I wondered why I couldn't see Good Old Diane's retweet, so I went on her profile to look for it.
Screenshot_20210508-074621_Twitter.jpg


Oh yeah...

That's what happens if you reply to one of her tweets, agreeing that she should not receive any abuse because of her skin colour...but should because of her incompetence.
 
And the photograph of her is an offence against the Trade Description Act. She looks OK-ish in the photo and she isn't.
 
Interesting to note that Americans still think of terrorists as freedom fighters providing an Irish family name can be grubbed up from somewhere.

They weren't so keen on terrorists when "freedom fighters" flew into the twin towers
 
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