BBC save comedy?

#81
It's much the same with the Jacques Tati films, pure visual comedy. Modern equivalent is the 'Mr Bean' episodes.
Good call. My son used to watch them with me when he was a lad. This was always his favourite scene...


Not surprisingly my grandson (now aged 10) also laughed his socks off at it... :)
 
#82
Liked the 'Black Books' programmes with Bill Bailey and Dylan Moran. Excellent mix of funny dialogue and the surreal. I was surprised when my 8 year old daughter (at the time) got it straight away and has developed a humour much like mine. Wife and other daughter still don't get it. DNA's a lottery.
I've got Black Books on DVD - I'll see what my grandson thinks of it.
 
#84
Comedy has been beneficial to society for a number of reasons, one of which has been encouraging people not to take themselves too seriously. I am sure I am not the only one who has laughed during tough times and though "this is just like..."

It has also had the function of.demonstrating that people, whatever their differences - gender, age, race, religion, sexuality, occupational group - are basically the same. A Muslim friend told me he loved the gentle humour of The Vicar of Dibley. The lack of ethic or religious minorities amongst the characters did not bother him.

We seem to be creating differences in the name of inclusiveness. Diversity should not only be about celebrating differences, but celebrating and recognising our shared values and the fact we all have the same life struggles.
 
#85
#86
I quite enjoyed Afterlife, though as I've stated on the TV thread I'm a bit 'meh' about his stuff the comic aspect of it seemed on the whole to be an add on and as I get called worse at work the swearyness rolled straight on over me. There were some genuinely fantastic moments of comedy as well as moving ones; the conversation with his dad suffering from dementia in the last episode left me in tears it was so well written and observed.
I was listening to Round the Horne this morning.....utter filth!!
Ooohhh helllooooo! How bona to vada your dolly old eak!
 
#87
My life has been spent in what are quite robust environs; merchant navy, army, police and tool hire
Is that renting out drills, compressors etc or supplying MPs for the after dinner speaker circuit?

(If anybody from the BBC is reading this, I'm currently available for a very reasonable rate).
 
#89
Ben Elton and Alexei Sayle. 35 years ago.
Yet both, when apolitical, were quite amusing, IMHO.[/QUOTE

I had the misfortune of seeing Elton & rik mayall @ Newcastle city hall, a fortnight after seeing Billy Connolly there, it was execrable. Connolly had me in tears of laughter, Elton in particular had me in tears of boredom. just a boring lefty cnut really
 

StBob072

LE
Book Reviewer
#90
Go for Piers, Wayne's a handy lad and was a tasty amateur boxer in his youth.

Plus you could punch him in the kisser till he looked like a vandalised bus seat, and nobody would know the difference :D
 

StBob072

LE
Book Reviewer
#91
It's as well to consider that much comedy does not travel well through time. Some manages the journey. Much does not.

Accepting that my observations are as subjective as those of the next person, much of the Two Ronnies, for example, now leaves me cold. Ditto Morecambe and Wise. There are a few golden moments, but there is rather a lot of meh. Dave Allen, I now find laboured. Monty Python (the TV output) has more padding in it than an old fashioned sofa. Spike Milligan had his genius moments, but there was an awful lot of self-indulgent twaddle to wade through. Last of the Summer Wine has never been funny. On the Buses? - just creepy.

Some comedians come back into fashion after a period in the wilderness; Frankie Howerd, for example.
Another was Max Wall in the 1970s (I never really did understand that one). Others, like Benny Hill never really managed it. If you disregard the gratuitous and rather pointless dolly bird stuff that seemed latterly to feature increasingly in his shows, he really was a very funny man.

I don't like something being consigned unloved and unmourned to a dusty corner of the vaults simply because it doesn't pass some kind of spurious PC test, but there's a fair bit that wouldn't now pass a comedy test. It is a subjective view and it's probably a difficult thing upon which to make a production decision. One man's meat... etc.

Was thinking the same recently.

The few things which I'd like to think are realtively timeless, have made me laugh out loud and also brought me to the brink of tears are :-

Blackadder
Red Dwarf
Phoenix Nights/Max and Paddy


All the above were based on the absurdity of the human condition.
 

Grownup_Rafbrat

LE
Book Reviewer
#93

old_fat_and_hairy

LE
Book Reviewer
Reviews Editor
#94
Is that renting out drills, compressors etc or supplying MPs for the after dinner speaker circuit?

(If anybody from the BBC is reading this, I'm currently available for a very reasonable rate).
The former, although I did deliver to a couple of the latter. Oddly enough, one was to St Jeffrey of Archer. A submersible water pump ( the object hired rather than the Lord) He was very happy to get his hands dirty - not for the first time but this was in the more literal sense. Also, he came over as a quite nice bloke; friendly and made me coffee. Not so the fragrant Lady. Cold and ……..well, cold.
 

old_fat_and_hairy

LE
Book Reviewer
Reviews Editor
#95
Gervais is as funny as an itchy ring piece and even more irritating.
I agree with what you say, he irritates me more than my piles, but taking an objective viewpoint, his scripts as written are funny. Him? Not at all.
 

old_fat_and_hairy

LE
Book Reviewer
Reviews Editor
#96
Good call. My son used to watch them with me when he was a lad. This was always his favourite scene...


Not surprisingly my grandson (now aged 10) also laughed his socks off at it... :)
I love Tati's style. Although I've not heard him say so, I believe Rowan Atkinson must have been influenced by Tati.
 
#97
The former, although I did deliver to a couple of the latter. Oddly enough, one was to St Jeffrey of Archer. A submersible water pump ( the object hired rather than the Lord) He was very happy to get his hands dirty - not for the first time but this was in the more literal sense. Also, he came over as a quite nice bloke; friendly and made me coffee. Not so the fragrant Lady. Cold and ……..well, cold.
Described by Ringo Star as "a nice enough person, but the sort of guy who would bottle your piss and sell it to you".

There was a sit com based in a DIY store, so why not one in a tool hire place, with stories of inept DIYers hiring tools they do not know how to use, or a creepy bloke admitting he is really building a dungeon for S&M and not a cupboard, that sort of thing.

Maybe it could be called Measure Once, Cut Twice?
 

old_fat_and_hairy

LE
Book Reviewer
Reviews Editor
#98
Described by Ringo Star as "a nice enough person, but the sort of guy who would bottle your piss and sell it to you".

There was a sit com based in a DIY store, so why not one in a tool hire place, with stories of inept DIYers hiring tools they do not know how to use, or a creepy bloke admitting he is really building a dungeon for S&M and not a cupboard, that sort of thing.

Maybe it could be called Measure Once, Cut Twice?
Probably a most apt description of Jeffrey.
 
#99
There was a sit com based in a DIY store, so why not one in a tool hire place, with stories of inept DIYers hiring tools they do not know how to use, or a creepy bloke admitting he is really building a dungeon for S&M and not a cupboard, that sort of thing.

Maybe it could be called Measure Once, Cut Twice?
The problem with shows of that type is that there is limited material.
So rather than just make one series, they plod on making two or three, and it ain't funny any more.
That was the genius of Fawlty Towers - they knew when to stop.
 

MrBane

LE
Moderator
Kit Reviewer
Reviews Editor
Filmed in SA near Hoedspruit. Mountains in the background a dead giveaway. Used to drive past them all the time on the way to Phalagat.
Meh. Watched Episode 1 and decided that whilst it was well shot / had a good whack of correct gear in it, apart from a few funny quips, it was pish.

The US guy getting killed, it just clashed with everything else in that episode and I suspect they should have avoided any deaths if they wanted to go down the comedy route. Plenty of scope for slapstick without anyone dying.

Meh.
 

Similar threads


Latest Threads

Top