BBC save comedy?

AlienFTM

MIA
Book Reviewer
#61
Not according to the Grauniad ( see quote above).
Apparently, one person in every 3 billion is affected by flash photography in the 25gHz range which causes them to have an epileptic fit. By a cruel trick of fate, the very same individuals are too f**king stupid to close their eyes when the cameras start up.
That's two or three on the planet. And they just happen to be in this country and watching this channel? What are the chances? Who'd a thunk it?
 

AlienFTM

MIA
Book Reviewer
#64
Presumably they are all dead now, all 2 or 3 of them, thanks to emergency vehicles

Ooh interesting concept. You have a population of say six billion. Three people out of six billion suffer an epileptic reaction in the circumstances and punch out. You no longer have three people out of six billion with the condition. Darwinism at its best.

Edit. I hope "global warming" has the same effect on snowflakes.
 
Last edited:
#65
Not according to the Grauniad ( see quote above).
Apparently, one person in every 3 billion is affected by flash photography in the 25gHz range which causes them to have an epileptic fit. By a cruel trick of fate, the very same individuals are too f**king stupid to close their eyes when the cameras start up.
Hah. In the old days, a church hall gig or disco wasn't complete without a compulsory liquid wheel light display, along with UV and strobe lighting (illegal now, I would guess). The UV was there so that if girls were wearing white underwear, all you could see was a fluorescent set of bra and panties boogieing on the dance floor on their own. I don't remember the strobes ever sparking off anyone's grand mal, although there were so many 'idiot dancing' hippies it would have been hard to tell.

I can still smell the patchouli.
 
#67
Ben Elton and Alexei Sayle. 35 years ago.
Yet both, when apolitical, were quite amusing, IMHO.
I agree about Alexei Sayle. Most of his stuff (at least, on TV) wasn't political and when it was, it was quite even-handed. He had a great scouser trades unionist character. Even at his rantiest, he never came across as sneery.

That's all that today's left-leaning crop of comedians are able to do, comfortable and secure only in the company of like-minded fellow performers and audiences.

Point scoring wånkers.
 
#68
I rather liked Gary Tank Commander (first series). It seemed to hit the spot without being particularly offensive to anyone (that hadn't taken part in the various putting dance moves to music videos). It was never particularly publicised, I found it trawling Netflix, but it proves that comedy is not completely dead these days.
 
#70
And. " Warning - the following news report contains flash photography !"
To which the current mrs_mush inevitably replies "I think we'll be the judge of that"
 

old_fat_and_hairy

LE
Book Reviewer
Reviews Editor
#71
It's as well to consider that much comedy does not travel well through time. Some manages the journey. Much does not.

Accepting that my observations are as subjective as those of the next person, much of the Two Ronnies, for example, now leaves me cold. Ditto Morecambe and Wise. There are a few golden moments, but there is rather a lot of meh. Dave Allen, I now find laboured. Monty Python (the TV output) has more padding in it than an old fashioned sofa. Spike Milligan had his genius moments, but there was an awful lot of self-indulgent twaddle to wade through. Last of the Summer Wine has never been funny. On the Buses? - just creepy.

Some comedians come back into fashion after a period in the wilderness; Frankie Howerd, for example.
Another was Max Wall in the 1970s (I never really did understand that one). Others, like Benny Hill never really managed it. If you disregard the gratuitous and rather pointless dolly bird stuff that seemed latterly to feature increasingly in his shows, he really was a very funny man.

I don't like something being consigned unloved and unmourned to a dusty corner of the vaults simply because it doesn't pass some kind of spurious PC test, but there's a fair bit that wouldn't now pass a comedy test. It is a subjective view and it's probably a difficult thing upon which to make a production decision. One man's meat... etc.
Not disagreeing with you, but I think that exceptions can be made. My grandson ( age 10 but soon to be 11) rather likes most of that of which you speak. He has also " discovered" Laurel and Hardy, Abbott and Costello and Hope and Crosby and roars with laughter.
As an aside, someone in the house put on that Ricky Gervais 'Afterlife'. Now I know he can write very good comedy, even though I cannot bear to watch him, but that particular 'sitcom' was full of vile language. Ok, we all know the words but I choose not to air them in front of 17 year old granddaughter, nor in front of my daughter. This is what I find despicable about modern comedy; the attempt to shock, whether it is by the use of foul language or the comedy of embarrassment. 'The Office' succeeded, but that was pretty much a one-off. To follow on with "car crash" content is lazy. It equates to the 6 year old boy running into a room and calling out a rude word. Older and more seasoned comedians managed rather well by innuendo and slyness. Consider 'Round the Horne' as an example.
 
#72
Ooh interesting concept. You have a population of say six billion. Three people out of six billion suffer an epileptic reaction in the circumstances and punch out.
My post from the Grauniad, above, refers.
Hah. In the old days, a church hall gig or disco wasn't complete without a compulsory liquid wheel light display, along with UV and strobe lighting
And all the lads's pimples glowing like Chernobyl
This is what I find despicable about modern comedy; the attempt to shock, whether it is by the use of foul language or the comedy of embarrassment.
I was given a series called 'Wayne', amongst 300Gb of stuff which included a lot of series, doccies etc, from a friend who has a 'pipeline' into stuff. (we are still in the steam age, data-wise, here in Safferland)
Never watched it. But gave that 300gb to my old man, who ranted about it - filth, stupid violence etc
I watched, with the FF button, the first episode.
Sorry, that was designed to be cuntish and offensive.
Designed for late teens who want to 'make a statement'.
 
#73
Not disagreeing with you, but I think that exceptions can be made. My grandson ( age 10 but soon to be 11) rather likes most of that of which you speak. He has also " discovered" Laurel and Hardy, Abbott and Costello and Hope and Crosby and roars with laughter.
As an aside, someone in the ..
Older and more seasoned comedians managed rather well by innuendo and slyness. Consider 'Round the Horne' as an example.
Kids of all ages love Tom & Jerry. Roadrunner and Coyote. Bugs Bunny v anyone.
Why? Because it is FUNNY. Yet the PC morons complain about 'mindless violence'.
I recall one very very rainy Sunday afternoon in about 1994, hiring a couple of Pink Panther videos. Mein girlfriend of the time, a slim ex-East German about 5'11' (called Brunhilde by the family, for some reason) was 'what is this?'
Next thing, she was in stitches.
Chaplin, Lloyd etc - visual comedy works.
The Sellers' Hotel cleaner scene?
Watch ... and if you don't grin...
Especially from 3:00

Apparently the cameramen corpsed more than Sellers did
 

old_fat_and_hairy

LE
Book Reviewer
Reviews Editor
#74
It's much the same with the Jacques Tati films, pure visual comedy. Modern equivalent is the 'Mr Bean' episodes.
 
#75
Not disagreeing with you, but I think that exceptions can be made. My grandson ( age 10 but soon to be 11) rather likes most of that of which you speak. He has also " discovered" Laurel and Hardy, Abbott and Costello and Hope and Crosby and roars with laughter.
As an aside, someone in the house put on that Ricky Gervais 'Afterlife'. Now I know he can write very good comedy, even though I cannot bear to watch him, but that particular 'sitcom' was full of vile language. Ok, we all know the words but I choose not to air them in front of 17 year old granddaughter, nor in front of my daughter. This is what I find despicable about modern comedy; the attempt to shock, whether it is by the use of foul language or the comedy of embarrassment. 'The Office' succeeded, but that was pretty much a one-off. To follow on with "car crash" content is lazy. It equates to the 6 year old boy running into a room and calling out a rude word. Older and more seasoned comedians managed rather well by innuendo and slyness. Consider 'Round the Horne' as an example.
I quite enjoyed Afterlife, though as I've stated on the TV thread I'm a bit 'meh' about his stuff the comic aspect of it seemed on the whole to be an add on and as I get called worse at work the swearyness rolled straight on over me. There were some genuinely fantastic moments of comedy as well as moving ones; the conversation with his dad suffering from dementia in the last episode left me in tears it was so well written and observed.
I was listening to Round the Horne this morning.....utter filth!!
 

old_fat_and_hairy

LE
Book Reviewer
Reviews Editor
#76
I quite enjoyed Afterlife, though as I've stated on the TV thread I'm a bit 'meh' about his stuff the comic aspect of it seemed on the whole to be an add on and as I get called worse at work the swearyness rolled straight on over me. There were some genuinely fantastic moments of comedy as well as moving ones; the conversation with his dad suffering from dementia in the last episode left me in tears it was so well written and observed.
I was listening to Round the Horne this morning.....utter filth!!
He is a very clever writer, no doubt about that. It's the vulgarity that I don't like.
Comedy is a very subjective matter, and Gervais just doesn't do it for me. My life has been spent in what are quite robust environs; merchant navy, army, police and tool hire, before coming to the relative gentility of academia, so the use of swearwords is not new. I just felt uncomfortable with them in a family setting, and consider it lay writing to use them. Taking RTH as an example, the implications are there but beautifully camouflaged as they were in older writings; those of Max Miller or Max Wall. Even Morecombe and Wise. And funnier ( in only my opinion) because of that.
 
#77
Liked the 'Black Books' programmes with Bill Bailey and Dylan Moran. Excellent mix of funny dialogue and the surreal. I was surprised when my 8 year old daughter (at the time) got it straight away and has developed a humour much like mine. Wife and other daughter still don't get it. DNA's a lottery.
 
#78
I can remember when any history programme concerning warfare of any description wasn’t pre announced with...
“the following programme contains themes that some viewers may find very distressing”
Any of your posts on the military should have that preface.
 
#79
The BBC parliament channel should have a disclaimer that "The following programme features lots of ****s, and you may find it distressing to learn how much they earn whilst spouting this ****"
 
#80
He is a very clever writer, no doubt about that. It's the vulgarity that I don't like.
Comedy is a very subjective matter, and Gervais just doesn't do it for me. My life has been spent in what are quite robust environs; merchant navy, army, police and tool hire, before coming to the relative gentility of academia, so the use of swearwords is not new. I just felt uncomfortable with them in a family setting, and consider it lay writing to use them. Taking RTH as an example, the implications are there but beautifully camouflaged as they were in older writings; those of Max Miller or Max Wall. Even Morecombe and Wise. And funnier ( in only my opinion) because of that.
Gervais is as funny as an itchy ring piece and even more irritating.
 

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