BBC Feels The Chill from Netflix

#81
The only reason I pay the license fee is so I can watch MotoGP / BSB live on BT Sport & Eurosport. There is nothing on live BBC, ITV, CH4 or Sky that has any interest for me whatsoever.
In order to watch BT Sport for the 18 weekends that they show MotoGP races and Eurosport for the 12 BSB races I pay £5 per month as I am a BT Broadband subscriber and £32 per month for Sky.
I pay money to the companies that provide the actual content that I view (or in the case of Sky, carry the channels that I view). I do wonder why I also have to pay £150 in order to fund half arsed reporting, second rate drama, PC re-education and reality TV programs.

I do listen to BBC 6 Music now and then but that is sadly becoming a PC propaganda mouthpiece so I am relying more and more on my Spotify playlists, so it would be a small loss.
When listening to BBC radio, it does strike me that they spend 20% of the airtime advertising other DJ's shows and also TV programs on BBC 1 & 2 so the advert free BBC does seem like a bit of a misnomer. I don't think introducing adverts on to the BBC will have much of an impact on their already poor quality output. It may even improve it, although you can bet your last dollar that they will probably cock up the finances and end up bankrupt within 3 years.
 
#82
The Tory government renewed the BBC's charter a few years ago and failed utterly to grasp several nettles.

Political bias could have been dealt with by placing the BBC fully under Ofcom regulation, like other TV channels in this country. Instead of doing this, Dave allowed the Corporation to continue to largely self regulate. This has emboldened BBC staff to the point that much of their output is a party political broadcast.

Funding TV companies through advertising is a non starter. Until Channel 4 appeared in the 1980s, ITV had a monopoly on TV advertising revenue. The writing was on the wall when Channel 5 appeared in the 1990s and TV advertising became worthless when Freeview appeared with dozens of channels. Voluntary subscription models as used by Netflix, Amazon and Sky are the way to go,

So far so good. The BBC licence fee is a subscription, but it's not voluntary. But the notion that you should have to pay for a BBC licence to watch other channels is outrageous. All broadcast TV in the UK can use conditional access. That includes Freeview, Freesat and even DAB radio. Look hard enough at your Freeview telly and you'll find a card slot.

Viewers could opt out of BBC as easily as they could opt out of Sky Movies, Premier League Football or the Playboy channel. How many would pay £154.50 to watch Dr Who implying that we are all racists if they didn't have to.

The real killer for the BBC will be the Internet. It's already putting print media, bookshops, phone companies and the Post Office out of business. The BBC's increasingly desperate attempts to cling to an antiquated business model will come to nothing.

I cut my TV antenna and logged out of iPlayer over a year ago. I'm still getting letters offering helpful hints about what to expect when I'm sent to prison. I've seen video of armed police being sent to people's homes to check whether they have a telly and the BBC still have greater powers of forced entry to peoples homes than any organisation except the fire brigade. Promises that the law would be changed to require the BBC to show evidence before they can get a warrant have been quietly ignored.

In it's present form, the BBC's days are numbered, not least because having a state controlled broadcaster in a democratic country is as inappropriate as having an official state newspaper. The Beeb's role as Britain's Pravda of the airwaves is about to come to a crashing halt.
 
#83
The Tory government renewed the BBC's charter a few years ago and failed utterly to grasp several nettles.

Political bias could have been dealt with by placing the BBC fully under Ofcom regulation, like other TV channels in this country. Instead of doing this, Dave allowed the Corporation to continue to largely self regulate. This has emboldened BBC staff to the point that much of their output is a party political broadcast.

Funding TV companies through advertising is a non starter. Until Channel 4 appeared in the 1980s, ITV had a monopoly on TV advertising revenue. The writing was on the wall when Channel 5 appeared in the 1990s and TV advertising became worthless when Freeview appeared with dozens of channels. Voluntary subscription models as used by Netflix, Amazon and Sky are the way to go,

So far so good. The BBC licence fee is a subscription, but it's not voluntary. But the notion that you should have to pay for a BBC licence to watch other channels is outrageous. All broadcast TV in the UK can use conditional access. That includes Freeview, Freesat and even DAB radio. Look hard enough at your Freeview telly and you'll find a card slot.

Viewers could opt out of BBC as easily as they could opt out of Sky Movies, Premier League Football or the Playboy channel. How many would pay £154.50 to watch Dr Who implying that we are all racists if they didn't have to.

The real killer for the BBC will be the Internet. It's already putting print media, bookshops, phone companies and the Post Office out of business. The BBC's increasingly desperate attempts to cling to an antiquated business model will come to nothing.

I cut my TV antenna and logged out of iPlayer over a year ago. I'm still getting letters offering helpful hints about what to expect when I'm sent to prison. I've seen video of armed police being sent to people's homes to check whether they have a telly and the BBC still have greater powers of forced entry to peoples homes than any organisation except the fire brigade. Promises that the law would be changed to require the BBC to show evidence before they can get a warrant have been quietly ignored.

In it's present form, the BBC's days are numbered, not least because having a state controlled broadcaster in a democratic country is as inappropriate as having an official state newspaper. The Beeb's role as Britain's Pravda of the airwaves is about to come to a crashing halt.

TV licensing is administered by Capita. Their 'inspectors' have no more right of entry than your next door neighbour. They apply for approx 150 warrants a year and very rarely use force to gain entry
 
#84
The only reason I used to watch the BBC for was the episodes of Dads Army on iplayer. Now they have it locked behind having to make an account with them I simply don't bother. I already have the boxset so I will just watch them instead.
 
#85
The Tory government renewed the BBC's charter a few years ago and failed utterly to grasp several nettles.

Political bias could have been dealt with by placing the BBC fully under Ofcom regulation, like other TV channels in this country. Instead of doing this, Dave allowed the Corporation to continue to largely self regulate. This has emboldened BBC staff to the point that much of their output is a party political broadcast.

Funding TV companies through advertising is a non starter. Until Channel 4 appeared in the 1980s, ITV had a monopoly on TV advertising revenue. The writing was on the wall when Channel 5 appeared in the 1990s and TV advertising became worthless when Freeview appeared with dozens of channels. Voluntary subscription models as used by Netflix, Amazon and Sky are the way to go,

So far so good. The BBC licence fee is a subscription, but it's not voluntary. But the notion that you should have to pay for a BBC licence to watch other channels is outrageous. All broadcast TV in the UK can use conditional access. That includes Freeview, Freesat and even DAB radio. Look hard enough at your Freeview telly and you'll find a card slot.

Viewers could opt out of BBC as easily as they could opt out of Sky Movies, Premier League Football or the Playboy channel. How many would pay £154.50 to watch Dr Who implying that we are all racists if they didn't have to.

The real killer for the BBC will be the Internet. It's already putting print media, bookshops, phone companies and the Post Office out of business. The BBC's increasingly desperate attempts to cling to an antiquated business model will come to nothing.

I cut my TV antenna and logged out of iPlayer over a year ago. I'm still getting letters offering helpful hints about what to expect when I'm sent to prison. I've seen video of armed police being sent to people's homes to check whether they have a telly and the BBC still have greater powers of forced entry to peoples homes than any organisation except the fire brigade. Promises that the law would be changed to require the BBC to show evidence before they can get a warrant have been quietly ignored.

In it's present form, the BBC's days are numbered, not least because having a state controlled broadcaster in a democratic country is as inappropriate as having an official state newspaper. The Beeb's role as Britain's Pravda of the airwaves is about to come to a crashing halt.


The government and BBC are not going to sit back and allow millions of people to go on dodging the licence fee. I fully expect the current TV licence to be replaced by a universal "Internet tax" (probably on every single ISP, contract or sim that affords internet access) as the BBC and government scrabble to replace lost revenue.
 
#86
TV licensing is administered by Capita. Their 'inspectors' have no more right of entry than your next door neighbour. They apply for approx 150 warrants a year and very rarely use force to gain entry
When I was making my house acceptable to move my family out of quarters, one might my wife and I decided it was good enough while the kids where at their nans.
We moved the TV in the house at about 2100 hrs. Next morning at 0645 we had crapita banging at my door. I told him to do one
 
#87
I don't subscribe to or listen/watch any BBC sh*t and haven't done for many years since I first twigged their lefty/ elitist/liberal bias.
The BBC should be sold off and the licence fee scrapped. For the damage the hierarchy have done to the Beeb - they should be jailed for treason.
Radio 2 should be renamed Gaydio 2 & that tw*t Jeremy V*ne whacked with a sock full of diarrhoea until he's black and brown. Jimmy Young must turn in his grave every time the tw*t goes on air.
I did "happen to overhear" popmaster whilst walking past an open door - everyday for a fortnight - and all the contestants seemed to be women (scoring just over 3/5 of sweet FA as usual) - are they now paying them to enter ? 'cause from memory of years ago women seldom entered.
As I said never listen to the cnuts nowadays.
 
#88
TV licensing is administered by Capita. Their 'inspectors' have no more right of entry than your next door neighbour. They apply for approx 150 warrants a year and very rarely use force to gain entry
And if Netflix applied for a warrant every other day to search peoples' homes, what do you think the courts would say? Or Sainsburys demanded access to your fridge to check that you hadn't been shoplifting? Just on the off chance that you might have been? No evidence to back up their suspicions you understand.

As things stand, no evidence needs to be shown in court and you don't even get informed that you are being taken to court so you can't offer any sort of defence. All the BBC's lawyers need to say is "We have reason to believe that broadcast TV is being received at the premises".

The government said that they would make licence evasion a criminal offence so that a proper hearing would take place and evidence would need to be shown in court. They didn't.

I believe that one third of non-motoring offences in magistrates' courts relate to TV licensing. We pay for that. The police have to attend. We pay for that too.

Thankfully, it's no longer the case that the majority of women in prison are there because of failure to pay for a TV licence but the BBC has resorted to using anti-terrorist legislation like the Regulation of Investigatory Powers Act to intercept people's communication while trying to prove they're watching telly illegally.

I believe that abuse of TV licensing legislation is out of control and it's only going to get worse as more people stop paying for a licence and the BBC gets increasingly desperate for cash. The government needs to get a grip of the BBC and force it to earn a living instead of running an extortion racket.
 
#89
The government and BBC are not going to sit back and allow millions of people to go on dodging the licence fee. I fully expect the current TV licence to be replaced by a universal "Internet tax" (probably on every single ISP, contract or sim that affords internet access) as the BBC and government scrabble to replace lost revenue.
Yep, thats a vote winner right there!
 
#90
Yep, thats a vote winner right there!

Conservatives, Labour and the BBC will all have a vested interest in this cash grab, so I think we can expect a propaganda blizzard up front. Probably there will be some themes involving the NHS, hard-working families, and the BBC's "award winning programmes".
 
#91
Conservatives, Labour and the BBC will all have a vested interest in this cash grab, so I think we can expect a propaganda blizzard up front. Probably there will be some themes involving the NHS, hard-working families, and the BBC's "award winning programmes".
I can't see the Tories jeopardising their election prospects to enrich the BBC. In fact, if we get a more right wing Tory government in the near future (are you reading this Boris?) I can see the screw being turned more aggressively on the BBC.

TV licences are currently free for the over 75s. Reducing that to over 65s to cover all retired people would be a massive vote winner among the blue rinse brigade while delivering a well deserved kick in the nuts to the Corporation - and all at no cost to either the government or the taxpayer.

It might also appeal to the wider public who are getting increasingly pi$$ed off with the BBC's profligacy. About a year ago, it was revealed that the Corporation was spending £30,000 a day on taxis to ferry staff between central London and the new HQ in Salford. More recently, they announced that they've budgeted over quarter of a billion quid for staff travel and hotel expenses for their next accounting period.

They don't do themselves any favours.
 
#92
Thanks to my DDS discount card I now have cinema and netflix with my sky package, ive got to say that since then i haven't watched anything on the BBC, I also don't use the BBC news as my homepage on the internet anymore, I look at the daily mail and guardian web pages then take the middle ground between both
 
#93
Thanks to my DDS discount card I now have cinema and netflix with my sky package, ive got to say that since then i haven't watched anything on the BBC, I also don't use the BBC news as my homepage on the internet anymore, I look at the daily mail and guardian web pages then take the middle ground between both
How much is your Sky package?
 
#94
Thanks to my DDS discount card I now have cinema and netflix with my sky package, ive got to say that since then i haven't watched anything on the BBC, I also don't use the BBC news as my homepage on the internet anymore, I look at the daily mail and guardian web pages then take the middle ground between both
You still have to pay the licence fee if you watch anything being broadcast on Sky, including Pay Per View
 
#95
TV Licensing tactics and their red threatograms marked "Investigation opened" are a pain in the arrse. From the TV Licensing page: "TV Licensing may also apply to a magistrate (or sheriff in Scotland) for a search warrant. However, this is only done as a last resort and when a senior manager and a legal adviser considers that there is good reason to believe that an offence has been committed." Administering the Licence fee - TV Licensing ™.
What law authorises enquiry officers to request access to my home? Can I refuse to let them in?
The Communications Act 2003 (opens in a new window) imposes an obligation on the BBC to issue TV Licences and collect the licence fee. The BBC must ensure that it fulfils its responsibility to the vast majority of households who pay their licence fee, by enforcing the law in respect of those who intentionally evade paying it. TV Licensing uses a range of activities to raise awareness about the requirement for a TV Licence, remind people to pay, inform them of ways to pay, and to deter people from evading the licence fee.

Enquiry officers do not have any legal powers to enter your home without a search warrant granted by a magistrate (or sheriff in Scotland). They (like other members of the public) rely on an implied right in common law to call at a property as far as the door, while going about their lawful business and making their presence known.

Enquiry officers must explain to the occupier of the premises why they are visiting, be polite, courteous and fair, and abide by rules of conduct. You have no obligation to grant entry to an enquiry officer if you don’t wish to do so. If refused entry by the occupier, the enquiry officer will leave the property. If enquiry officers are refused access, then TV Licensing reserve the right to use other methods of detection.

Enquiry officers may apply for authorisation to use detection equipment if they are refused entry on to premises. TV Licensing may also apply to a magistrate (or sheriff in Scotland) for a search warrant. However, this is only done as a last resort and when a senior manager and a legal adviser considers that there is good reason to believe that an offence has been committed.
 
#96
How much is your Sky package?
Oh i still pay for my licence, but I went all in and i have sky q and mini box Inc everything but sky sports, unlimited super fast broadband, and anytime calls all for £79 a month plus £20 installation, compared to the £39 I was paying for sky and £72 just for bt broadband. Switchover was a doddle and I have had no problems so far. The only down side is that I have to pay bt £7.50 a month to keep my bt email addresses, I just phoned sky up spoke to the bloke on the phone, gave him the code i got from the discount website and he did the rest, as i recall the package would be about £40 with the defence discount
 
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#97
Oh i still pay for my licence, but I went all in and i have sky q and mini box Inc everything but sky sports, unlimited super fast broadband, and anytime calls all for £79 a month plus £20 installation, compared to the £39 I was paying for sky and £72 just for bt broadband. Switchover was a doddle and I have had no problems so far. The only down side is that I have to pay bt £7.50 a month to keep my bt email addresses, I just phoned them up spoke to the bloke I the phone gave him the coffee i got from the discount website and he did the rest, as i recall the package would be about £40 with the defence discount
Jesus
 

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