BBC Feels The Chill from Netflix

#1
According to this article the BBC 'lost' 860,000 license fee payers in 2017/18. This was a record high for the corporation and breaks last year's then record of 798,000 cancellations. The losses in the main are attributed to viewers going over to Netflix, but also I imagine significant losses are also due to the negative publicity it receives over some issues, eg political bias.

Fag packet stats: The current fee is £150.50pa. Multiply that by 860,000 and you get £129,430,000 - a loss of over £129 million in expected income in just one year.

If those figures are correct It would appear that dear old Auntie Beeb is not just bleeding but she's been bashed on the head and is sprawled on the kitchen floor haemorrhaging from every orifice.

The Corporation has tried to stem the flow by increasing the license fee each year with inflation and ceasing free licenses for the elderly, but they will in no-way go to make up for the losses.

Most modern societies have a state funded broadcaster, and I don't expect the BBC to disappear, but unless their figures in improve it will look very different in just a few years time and they'll be in no position to pay pundits £1.75 million to talk over a football game.
 
#2
High time the BBC upped their game and produced stuff people want to watch.50 year old episodes of Dad's Army will just not cut it anymore.
They will also have to get away from the politically correct mindset that seems to permeate their current selection of programing.
 
#3
Most modern societies have a state funded broadcaster, and I don't expect the BBC to disappear, but unless their figures in improve it will look very different in just a few years time and they'll be in no position to pay pundits £1.75 million to talk over a football game.
The BBC is not a state funded broadcaster in the generally accepted sense. It is a publicly funded broadcaster and as such it should be agenda free and wholly neutral in all that it does. It should also use its public funding in such a way as to extract maximum value for money for the public providing that funding. £1.75m for a football pundit (as an example) is perfectly acceptable for a self funding commercial station but a blatant misuse of public funding. The Cliff Richard thing a positively criminal waste of funding.

If the compulsory licence fee was changed to a voluntary subscription (on a don't pay, can't watch basis a la Sky/Netflix), how long would the BBC survive as a publicly funded service?

Netflix Premium £119.88 per year
BBC £150.50 per year.
 
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#4
They will also have to get away from the politically correct mindset that seems to permeate their current selection of programing.
It's not just the BBC. Some of the cast of the Inbetweeners believe that it would just not get made today, And we're not talking about something made in back the 70s. Same with Little Britain and Come Fly With Me (but in that case, I think that it's Matt Lucas having an attack of the vapours). Things are moving apace.
 
#5
....................They will also have to get away from the politically correct mindset that seems to permeate their current selection of programing.
Couldn't agree more. When Mrs b and myself were childminding our grandson, we used to have the telly on Cbeebies, but it was clearly brainwashing young children with its equality and diversity agenda.
 
#6
In most peoples mind it’s just another tax that they can’t avoid. The politically correctness drives you round the bend, in their “ads” for the tv license all the families are mixed race and this agenda is pushed even in CBeebies promos and as for political bias, don’t get me started.
 
#7
High time the BBC upped their game and produced stuff people want to watch.50 year old episodes of Dad's Army will just not cut it anymore.
They will also have to get away from the politically correct mindset that seems to permeate their current selection of programing.

Ironically, the BBC's own cultural marxism is rapidly making most of its own popular archive un-screenable.

Its hard to think of a much loved classic comedy series, drama or even documentary from the 70s/80s/ even 90s that would pass today's cultish censorship.
 
#8
I got rid of my tv licence in 2018. Without a licence, you should not watch TV as it broadcast or on catch up (edited as per Happy Nomad's clarification).
My TV and all of the cabling, etc is in a box in the attic. Before I got rid of my licence, I hadn't watched TV for about a year, having gradually watched more and more of Youtube - mainly history docs - on my tablet. The only real difference to my life is that I have no idea who many TV personalities are; and don't know what colleagues etc are talking about when they discuss this or that programme. So not major issues.
I'm pretty pleased that my financial contribution to the BBC's politics is as low as it can be. As well as Netflix, the existential threat to the BBC may come with those who are now teenagers and young adults. Those groups consume media on their tablets, laptops and phones as opposed to sitting down to be entertained by the TV set.
 
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#9
I got rid of my tv licence in 2018. To do so, you have to get rid of your ability to watch live (that is, as it is transmitted) TV, so my TV and all of the cabling, etc is in a box in the attic. When I got rid of my licence, I hadn't actually watched TV for about a year, having gradually watched more and more of Youtube - mainly history docs - on my tablet. The only real difference to my life is that I have no idea who many TV personalities are; and don't know what colleagues etc are talking about when they discuss this or that programme. So not major issues.
I'm pretty pleased that my financial contribution to the BBC's politics is as low as it can be. As well as Netflix, the existential threat to the BBC may come with those who are now teenagers and young adults. Those groups consume media on their tablets, laptops and phones as opposed to sitting down to be entertained by the TV set.
Agreed. As far as I'm concerned it's already over for the BBC, even though most of us still think along old world order lines. YouTube, NetFlix, Amazon Prime and all the rest (who knows even better ones might emerge?) have taken them all out of the game. It’s over people. Has been for a long time. Get over it. It’s no longer about live broadcasting, it’s about accessing content in your own time at your convenience.

Television, paradoxically continues to thrive: Game Of Thrones, Breaking Bad, House Of Cards, True Detective, The Leftovers, Ascension. We've had brilliant TV from the past few years, we are in a golden Age of TV. So much nicer than sitting in some shithole cinema where they charge £50 just to get you and your old lady through the door with some arse wipe popcorn.
 
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#10
I don't think the BBC is multicultural enough.

I want the the entire cast of Eastenders to be made up of beardy skinheads and chicks in burkhas.
 
#11
To do so, you have to get rid of your ability to watch live (that is, as it is transmitted)
No you don't. You simply have to stop watching broadcast tv (and iPlayer) via any medium to remain wholly within the law.

Applying a little logic then... If you had to get rid of your ability to watch broadcast tv, as well as needing to get rid any equipment needed to view broadcast tv on a TV set (aerial/dish, set top box etc) you would also have to get rid of your smart phone, tablet, laptop etc.

That you have the capability to watch broadcast TV is completely irrelevant. The BBC (or its agents) have to satisfy a magistrate that you were watching broadcast TV without a licence to gain a conviction for evasion.

Virtually impossible unless you grant them access and they it see for themselves or the non licence holder admits it to the 'enforcement officer'. The law is on your side here as, without a warrant, they have no right to be on your property (just politely ask them to remove themselves*) and you are not compelled to even pass the time of day with them, never mind incriminate yourself.

A warrant permitting entry for tv licence enforcement is going to be pretty difficult to obtain too as "we think Mr Whippy at No 99 Cornetto St. doesn't have a licence" is not really compelling evidence. Enforcement officers rely almost entirely on self incrimination but even there, something to the order one third of all prosecutions fail by virtue of being wrongly brought.

*You can write to the BBC withdrawing your (implied) consent for their enforcement officers to enter your property.
 
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#12
No you don't. You simply have to stop watching broadcast tv (and iPlayer) via any medium to remain wholly within the law.

Applying a little logic then... If you had to get rid of your ability to watch broadcast tv, as well as needing to get rid any equipment needed to view broadcast tv on a TV set (aerial/dish, set top box etc) you would also have to get rid of your smart phone, tablet, laptop etc.

That you have the capability to watch broadcast TV is completely irrelevant. The BBC (or its agents) have to satisfy a magistrate that you were watching broadcast TV without a licence to gain a conviction for evasion.

Virtually impossible unless you grant them access and they it see for themselves or the non licence holder admits it to the 'enforcement officer'. The law is on your side here as, without a warrant, they have no right to be on your property (just politely ask them to remove themselves*) and you are not compelled to even pass the time of day with them, never mind incriminate themselves.

A warrant permitting entry for tv licence enforcement is going to be pretty difficult to obtain too as "we think Mr Whippy at No 99 Cornetto St. doesn't have a licence" is not really compelling evidence. Enforcement officers rely almost entirely on self incrimination but even there, something to the order one third of all prosecutions fail by virtue of being wrongly brought.

*You can write to the BBC withdrawing your (implied) consent for their enforcement officers to enter your property.
That's a fair point. The TV licence people say that, to not need a licence, you

'...won’t be watching or recording any programmes as they’re being shown on TV or live on an online TV service.'

I hadn't watched Tv for some time before getting rid of my licence so packing it away (as it was not used) was not a problem. I had to close my iplayer account too and that was that. There being nowt really on TV removes the temptation to try to circumvent the rule.
 
#13
High time the BBC upped their game and produced stuff people want to watch.50 year old episodes of Dad's Army will just not cut it anymore.
They will also have to get away from the politically correct mindset that seems to permeate their current selection of programing.
I like Dad's Army .........it's about the best thing on the BBC - which may be part of the reason they are losing viewers. Radio is as bad - I listen to Today in the mornings and it's been going downhill rapidly- the presenters constantly talk over the interviewees which is very irritating
 
#15
I don't think the BBC is multicultural enough.

I want the the entire cast of Eastenders to be made up of beardy skinheads and chicks in burkhas.
What, like the real East End?
 
#16
In most peoples mind it’s just another tax that they can’t avoid. The politically correctness drives you round the bend, in their “ads” for the tv license all the families are mixed race and this agenda is pushed even in CBeebies promos and as for political bias, don’t get me started.
And virtually all the ads on commercial telly have mixed race families.
Being a knackered old fart and retired, I do find watching daytime TV like Countdown, Fifteen to One and Friends plus the Chase take up a bit of my time now. The ads for taking out death insurance, funeral insurance, look after you loved ones insurance etc all feature mixed race families. Even the ones who are dead have a white missus with mixed race kids and a photo of the deceased black Dad.
As do evening ads for supermarkets and so on.
Way of the world, I'm afraid and hardly a Beeb monopoly.

However, I digress. Spain binned its licence fee many years ago. It still has state sponsored channels which are subsidised but rely on commercials for much of their funding. You will be really pissed off if the Beeb goes that way as they have 20 minutes of programming followed by 20 minutes of ads (I once counted 104 ads in one break).
(Fortunately I have a very old Sony recorder that allows me to edit recorded programmes so I record what I want and then edit out all the ads. A recent Rizzoli and Isles marathon was recorded for 8 hours 42 minutes and came down to 5 hours 40 minutes when I edited the ads out).

I do like some of the Beeb output. As I don't pay a licence fee for the Freesat stuff I don't really have a problem with it.

Plus my Amazon Prime (Spanish but same content as UK with about 10% Spanish content) only cost me €29.99 for the year and that includes the free next delivery from Amazon.es.
Looked at Netflix (free month trial) but not really that interested in loads of the content.
By the by, how much does Netflix cost? Here it's from €7 to €13 a month depending on if you want SD, HD or UHD.
 
#17
I like Dad's Army .........it's about the best thing on the BBC - which may be part of the reason they are losing viewers. Radio is as bad - I listen to Today in the mornings and it's been going downhill rapidly- the presenters constantly talk over the interviewees which is very irritating
Do not listen to Nihal Arthanayake
 
#18
BBC response:

Lobby Gov't:;TV License req'd for all internet faster than dial-up/ISDN
 
#20
BBC response:

Lobby Gov't:;TV License req'd for all internet faster than dial-up/ISDN
No doubt you know what you mean but could you pad it out with a little detail or a link to whatever you are telling us please?
 

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