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BBC Breaking News: Chinook Crashed in Afghan - All crew ok

#2
Good news for the crew. My understanding is when Chinnie goes wrong, it goes very wrong. Well done to the pilot.

On a more pragmatic note (and possibly guilty of internal prejudice), I hope whatever went wrong can't be attributed to the increased airframe hours so loudly trumpeted of late.
 
#7
http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/uk/8211552.stm

The British crew escaped injury in Afghanistan after a Chinook helicopter was forced to make an emergency landing, the Ministry of Defence says.

The crew managed to safely evacuate the helicopter after an engine fire forced the landing in Helmand on Wednesday.

The MoD said it was not ruling out enemy fire as a possible cause for the emergency landing.

The aircraft was deliberately destroyed by a coalition airstrike to keep it out of enemy hands.

The crew were picked up by another Chinook immediately after the incident.

The Ministry of Defence said that in the short term other UK aircraft in the region, and those operated by Nato partners, would be able to cover the "helicopter lift requirement".

"In the medium term, the UK's joint helicopter command is already planning the replacement of this airframe," it said.
 
#8
Mr_Deputy said:
If anyone has a spare Chinook - please step forward now.

There are some in storage at Odiham apparently
 
#9
"In the medium term, the UK's joint helicopter command is already planning the replacement of this airframe," it said.

That's the level of professional competence that keeps our forces at the cutting edge...
 
#10
The aircraft was deliberately destroyed by a coalition airstrike to keep it out of enemy hands.

Bloody hell, Terry has Chinook pilots???
 
#11
Most of our Chinook fleet went down with the Atlantic Conveyor and was never replaced. Well done the pilot here. Two engined helos are fcuking impossible to fly when one engine goes pear shaped.
 
#12
duffdike said:
Most of our Chinook fleet went down with the Atlantic Conveyor and was never replaced.


No they didn't and yes they were.
 
#14
Oil_Slick said:
Mr_Deputy said:
If anyone has a spare Chinook - please step forward now.

There are some in storage at Odiham apparently
Mk2 airframes just sat in storage!? It's a pretty stretched fleet so one less airframe is still going to hurt. If you're talking about one of the reverted Mk3s then they were supposed to be additional capacity, not replacements for blown up aircraft.

I think someone needs to get his chequebook out...

Incidentally AgustaWestland can now make the Chinook under contract, so anyone saying that Boeing don't have the capacity is conveniently ignoring that!
 
#15
empty_vessel said:
Oil_Slick said:
Mr_Deputy said:
If anyone has a spare Chinook - please step forward now.

There are some in storage at Odiham apparently
Mk2 airframes just sat in storage!? It's a pretty stretched fleet so one less airframe is still going to hurt. If you're talking about one of the reverted Mk3s then they were supposed to be additional capacity, not replacements for blown up aircraft.

I think someone needs to get his chequebook out...

Incidentally AgustaWestland can now make the Chinook under contract, so anyone saying that Boeing don't have the capacity is conveniently ignoring that!

I'm sure someone posted here recently that there are Mk2 airframes in the hanger.
 
#16
Oil_Slick said:
duffdike said:
Most of our Chinook fleet went down with the Atlantic Conveyor and was never replaced.


No they didn't and yes they were.
Three Chinooks were lost on the Atlantic Conveyor. If that was "most of our Chinook fleet" then we must have only had two more remaining. If those lost were never replaced we still only have two, and one has just been lost in Afghanistan.

That leaves us with only one Chinook in service. It's going to be busy...
 
#17
duffdike said:
Most of our Chinook fleet went down with the Atlantic Conveyor and was never replaced. Well done the pilot here. Two engined helos are fcuking impossible to fly when one engine goes pear shaped.
Not entirely true, although theres something in the saying that the second engine will take you to the scene of the crash.

Good drills by the crew getting it down and then getting out safely.
 
#18
Interceptor said:
Oil_Slick said:
duffdike said:
Most of our Chinook fleet went down with the Atlantic Conveyor and was never replaced.


No they didn't and yes they were.
Three Chinooks were lost on the Atlantic Conveyor. If that was "most of our Chinook fleet" then we must have only had two more remaining. If those lost were never replaced we still only have two, and one has just been lost in Afghanistan.

That leaves us with only one Chinook in service. It's going to be busy...
Bravo November survived and is still a working airframe at RAF Odiham.

"Bravo November was part of a Chinook four-ship that
was supposed to deploy to the Falkland Islands. The Atlantic
Conveyor, the container ship carrying them south, was sunk
by an Exocet sea-skimming missile on 25 May 1982 by an
Argentine Navy Dassault Super Étendard. While the other
three aircraft sank along with the ship, Bravo November was
airborne at the time, picking up freight from HMS Glasgow.
It then flew to the safety of the aircraft carrier HMS Hermes,
where it was nicknamed ‘The Survivor’.
Later in the conflict, during a night mission, Bravo Novem-
ber was transporting three 105mm guns to British troops
when the pilot, Squadron Leader Dick Langworthy, a thick
snow shower clouding his vision, collided with the sea at
around 100 knots (175 km/h). The collision was caused by a
faulty altimeter, and the impact with the water fl ooded the
engine intakes. By some miracle Langworthy and his co-pilot
were able to get the helicopter airborne once more. Unable to
navigate, with the radio damaged, Bravo November returned
to San Carlos to discover the impact had caused nothing more
than damage to the radio systems and dents to the fuselage.
Once again living up to its reputation as the Survivor. "

This is an exert from a book called 'Immediate Response'
 

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