BBC bias in question (which way do they lean?)

Hey - if most people had to render what they eat themselves, you'd see a LOT more vegetarians.
Or a lot more ethical meat eaters, not on here but generally I am in a minority where I was taught to draw a pheasant, pigeon etc. Skin rabbits, or butcher a deer but I come from a long line of country and farming folk and eating rabbit and other fluffy creatures was part and parcel of extra meat rations. How many on here have eaten squirrel or pike for example.
 
I've cut down on meat.

I'm not going vegie or vegan, but I just accept that they are alternative meals. Besides which I get custom cooked food which is very nice.
We eat a lot more Quorn than we do actual meat, amazing just how many quick meals you can create with the stuff. Their sausages are crap though.
 

Cold_Collation

LE
Book Reviewer
We eat a lot more Quorn than we do actual meat, amazing just how many quick meals you can create with the stuff. Their sausages are crap though.
I don't think we even do a meat chilli in this house any more. Quorn wins it every time.

Quorn 'ham, 'turkey' and 'sausages' are gopping, though.
 
Hey - if most people had to render what they eat themselves, you'd see a LOT more vegetarians.
When the mushlings were growing up, I made sure they understood where everything on their plates had come from. Not just the meat but the fish, dairy, cereals and veg too. We'd have a discussion as to why the out of season asparagus from Peru was gopping compared to the English version when available. Why insisting on free-range, organic eggs for breakfast is all well and good but if the majority of the egg you consume has already been cooked into processed cakes and other food, then it's unlikely to be as ethically sourced as your boiled egg in the morning. Why the south east asian River Cobbler was shoite compared to Icelandic cod despite what that fat tongued idiot Jamie Oliver says.

It did result in some moments when they went to a 'petting' farm on a school trip and the proud youth worker was showing off the collection of rare breed goats. Cue mush_lass asking "Does that mean they taste better, because the last time I ate goat it tasted of wee"

Mush_lass did go through a veggie phase at Uni but has since grown out of that - still won't eat offal though. In fact she's quite a gourmand now and one of the reasons she dumped her last boyfriend was that he'd eat nothing more adventurous than pizzas, burgers and KFC, wouldn't drink anything other than mainstream lager either.

Now she calls herself an 'ethical' carnivore. She'll check the provenance of most things she buys, tries not to eat out of season veg that's traveled halfway around the world, and will check the ingredients on processed food and if there's much on the list that you wouldn't find a kitchen cupboard, then she'll make it herself - her current rant is about salad dressings.

She's working in that there London and in her office there was an invitation to sponsor an animal at an inner city farm. She said she would if it could be a pig, and only if she could have it slaughtered and butchered in time for Christmas. Her rational was that she was going to make ham, sausages, bacon, pies and pate for Christmas presents. Cue most of her colleagues having a severe attack of the vapours. "But I'm not sponsoring a bloody pet", she declared, "if it's a farm animal, then it should be either kept for breeding, or destined for the plate". I don't think the sponsorship got off the ground. If I wasn't there at her conception and birth, I'm sure she could be French.
 

Grownup_Rafbrat

LE
Book Reviewer
We eat a lot more Quorn than we do actual meat, amazing just how many quick meals you can create with the stuff. Their sausages are crap though.
Have you seen how environmentally bad is the production of soya??????
 
Or a lot more ethical meat eaters, not on here but generally I am in a minority where I was taught to draw a pheasant, pigeon etc. Skin rabbits, or butcher a deer but I come from a long line of country and farming folk and eating rabbit and other fluffy creatures was part and parcel of extra meat rations. How many on here have eaten squirrel or pike for example.
Squirrel, groundhog, possum. It's what happens when you marry into a redneck hillbilly family.

Sent from my SM-T510 using Tapatalk
 
When the mushlings were growing up, I made sure they understood where everything on their plates had come from. Not just the meat but the fish, dairy, cereals and veg too. We'd have a discussion as to why the out of season asparagus from Peru was gopping compared to the English version when available. Why insisting on free-range, organic eggs for breakfast is all well and good but if the majority of the egg you consume has already been cooked into processed cakes and other food, then it's unlikely to be as ethically sourced as your boiled egg in the morning. Why the south east asian River Cobbler was shoite compared to Icelandic cod despite what that fat tongued idiot Jamie Oliver says.

It did result in some moments when they went to a 'petting' farm on a school trip and the proud youth worker was showing off the collection of rare breed goats. Cue mush_lass asking "Does that mean they taste better, because the last time I ate goat it tasted of wee"

Mush_lass did go through a veggie phase at Uni but has since grown out of that - still won't eat offal though. In fact she's quite a gourmand now and one of the reasons she dumped her last boyfriend was that he'd eat nothing more adventurous than pizzas, burgers and KFC, wouldn't drink anything other than mainstream lager either.

Now she calls herself an 'ethical' carnivore. She'll check the provenance of most things she buys, tries not to eat out of season veg that's traveled halfway around the world, and will check the ingredients on processed food and if there's much on the list that you wouldn't find a kitchen cupboard, then she'll make it herself - her current rant is about salad dressings.

She's working in that there London and in her office there was an invitation to sponsor an animal at an inner city farm. She said she would if it could be a pig, and only if she could have it slaughtered and butchered in time for Christmas. Her rational was that she was going to make ham, sausages, bacon, pies and pate for Christmas presents. Cue most of her colleagues having a severe attack of the vapours. "But I'm not sponsoring a bloody pet", she declared, "if it's a farm animal, then it should be either kept for breeding, or destined for the plate". I don't think the sponsorship got off the ground. If I wasn't there at her conception and birth, I'm sure she could be French.
For that sir you get an excellent, my teen is of a similar ilk and understands where food comes from.
 
Have you seen how environmentally bad is the production of soya??????
Quorn is not Soya, it is a micro-fungi and is actually quite environmentally friendly, but Soya is extremely bad for the environment, but so is the intensive farming of avocados and almonds.
 
When the mushlings were growing up, I made sure they understood where everything on their plates had come from. Not just the meat but the fish, dairy, cereals and veg too. We'd have a discussion as to why the out of season asparagus from Peru was gopping compared to the English version when available. Why insisting on free-range, organic eggs for breakfast is all well and good but if the majority of the egg you consume has already been cooked into processed cakes and other food, then it's unlikely to be as ethically sourced as your boiled egg in the morning. Why the south east asian River Cobbler was shoite compared to Icelandic cod despite what that fat tongued idiot Jamie Oliver says.

It did result in some moments when they went to a 'petting' farm on a school trip and the proud youth worker was showing off the collection of rare breed goats. Cue mush_lass asking "Does that mean they taste better, because the last time I ate goat it tasted of wee"

Mush_lass did go through a veggie phase at Uni but has since grown out of that - still won't eat offal though. In fact she's quite a gourmand now and one of the reasons she dumped her last boyfriend was that he'd eat nothing more adventurous than pizzas, burgers and KFC, wouldn't drink anything other than mainstream lager either.

Now she calls herself an 'ethical' carnivore. She'll check the provenance of most things she buys, tries not to eat out of season veg that's traveled halfway around the world, and will check the ingredients on processed food and if there's much on the list that you wouldn't find a kitchen cupboard, then she'll make it herself - her current rant is about salad dressings.

She's working in that there London and in her office there was an invitation to sponsor an animal at an inner city farm. She said she would if it could be a pig, and only if she could have it slaughtered and butchered in time for Christmas. Her rational was that she was going to make ham, sausages, bacon, pies and pate for Christmas presents. Cue most of her colleagues having a severe attack of the vapours. "But I'm not sponsoring a bloody pet", she declared, "if it's a farm animal, then it should be either kept for breeding, or destined for the plate". I don't think the sponsorship got off the ground. If I wasn't there at her conception and birth, I'm sure she could be French.
Yep - my little Princess is the same. Loves kittens, very gentle, she met her partner in junior school and they are both mid 30's and still very much together. Partner is a master butcher, knows where all the animals come from and has often visited them on the farms. The are very foodie and go for good quality in smaller quantities, seasonal and locally sourced. They just plod through life and wind up as many as they can over other people's hypocrisy about sustainability. (Classic is - how did that avacado get from America to your plate?)
 
Last edited:

Cold_Collation

LE
Book Reviewer
When the mushlings were growing up, I made sure they understood where everything on their plates had come from. Not just the meat but the fish, dairy, cereals and veg too. We'd have a discussion as to why the out of season asparagus from Peru was gopping compared to the English version when available. Why insisting on free-range, organic eggs for breakfast is all well and good but if the majority of the egg you consume has already been cooked into processed cakes and other food, then it's unlikely to be as ethically sourced as your boiled egg in the morning. Why the south east asian River Cobbler was shoite compared to Icelandic cod despite what that fat tongued idiot Jamie Oliver says.

It did result in some moments when they went to a 'petting' farm on a school trip and the proud youth worker was showing off the collection of rare breed goats. Cue mush_lass asking "Does that mean they taste better, because the last time I ate goat it tasted of wee"

Mush_lass did go through a veggie phase at Uni but has since grown out of that - still won't eat offal though. In fact she's quite a gourmand now and one of the reasons she dumped her last boyfriend was that he'd eat nothing more adventurous than pizzas, burgers and KFC, wouldn't drink anything other than mainstream lager either.

Now she calls herself an 'ethical' carnivore. She'll check the provenance of most things she buys, tries not to eat out of season veg that's traveled halfway around the world, and will check the ingredients on processed food and if there's much on the list that you wouldn't find a kitchen cupboard, then she'll make it herself - her current rant is about salad dressings.

She's working in that there London and in her office there was an invitation to sponsor an animal at an inner city farm. She said she would if it could be a pig, and only if she could have it slaughtered and butchered in time for Christmas. Her rational was that she was going to make ham, sausages, bacon, pies and pate for Christmas presents. Cue most of her colleagues having a severe attack of the vapours. "But I'm not sponsoring a bloody pet", she declared, "if it's a farm animal, then it should be either kept for breeding, or destined for the plate". I don't think the sponsorship got off the ground. If I wasn't there at her conception and birth, I'm sure she could be French.
Sis-in-law is an RSPCA officer. It certainly changed her mind as to the provenance of the food that she eats.
 
I don't think we even do a meat chilli in this house any more. Quorn wins it every time.

Quorn 'ham, 'turkey' and 'sausages' are gopping, though.
If you use the Quorn pieces you can make a half decent Curry or Sweet & Sour with the cook in sauce of your choice. As already said, Quorn Chilli is nice as is plain old mince & tatties or Beef Stew & Dumplings.
 
One good thing about Quorn is that it is produced in the UK, so no shipping Soya or other stuff half way around the world
 

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