BBC bias in question (which way do they lean?)

Again, it just reinforces the bias of a small, fairly privileged group of urbanites.

The story is largely pre-written, rather than there being an effort made to find out what was going on.

I ran a technology publication for a good few years, then when I stood away became technical editor. I finally quit completely when it became clear that the new editor would ask for a story on something, then would object to anything which didn’t meet his personal biases.

The job is to convey - to tell people what is happening - not to mould to your own ways of thinking. That distinction has been lost, whether it be in something as relatively innocuous* as Country File or news reporting.

If - if - we need another lifestyle show, then create one. Don’t ruin something which was doing a fair job.

All this really does is show the limitations of the people that theBBC recruits and promotes. There’s a very small set of groupthink going on.



*Actually, it’s not innocuous. Farming is important. Anthropomorphising ‘cute little’ badgers and foxes, for instance, is all very well. The realities are different.
'cute little badgers'? Have you seen the size of the the perma-pissed off *******?

And there's a reason the saffa twats are called honey badgers. Grumpy *********, each and every one.
 
It used to be done by the Post Office. I bought a flat in Bournemouth in June 96 and couldn't afford a TV licence. Saying that I couldn't afford a telly either, and since I was working six or seven nights a week I didn't miss it. I received a couple of letters from the Post Office TV Licencing Unit and I sent them back, registering as a non-payer.

1230, Friday 13th December, 1996 (it's funny how you remember certain dates) and I'm woken by banging on my bedroom window. It's Adrian, who got me to move south in the first place, but can't hack it and is moving back up north. I let him and his girlfriend in.

"Can you take my telly back home with you when you go up for Christmas?"
"Aye, alright then."
"Okay, we'll just get it, it's in Becky's car."

At which point the doorbell rings. I've been awake for five minutes.

"Hello, Mr ******?"
"Yes."
"I'm from the Post Office TV Licensing Unit. Do you have a television licence?"
"No. I'm a registered non-payer. Do you want to have a look round to see that I haven't got a telly?"

So I show the bloke round my rather sparsely furnished flat, with Twit and Twat standing in the living room looking both guilty and gormless. I show him out and he says that I won't be hearing from them again.

Had they woken me five minutes earlier the would have been a BFO telly sat in my living room for the only time in six months just as the TV Licensing bod turned up. Then it would have been a Friday 13th to remember.

They made their excuses and left, with the telly. I collected the telly just before Christmas and it took up the back seat of my car, taking two of us to lift it. Only when I dropped it off at Adrian's parents he said "I didn't know you had a car". He had expected me to carry the bloody thing on the train.
You wouldn't have had to let them in.
 
TV detector vans do not exist. Any vans are fake vans they send round council estates etc to panic people.
The BBC employs Capita to send first send 'threatograms' to addresses that do not have a licence. After many rounds of these these, escalating in threats they may send goons to sell you a licence but mainly to try and get a confession. The goon will get a bonus for this and in any case needs to get a number every month. His manager will also have targets.
Don't answer their letters and if they call at the door don't give them your name, just tell them to bugger off. .
That is true, they just check out addresses without a license. But I have seen a Youtube video of the detector van technology and I think it does exist and work. They probably have fake vans also, as a deterrent and also use the addresses without TV licenses to target. But if the occupant turns their TV off their is no signal to detect. And I very much doubt they could triangulate their detector to a block of flats. If you had a TV in an isolated farmhouse, it would probably be pretty easy to locate your TV.
 
That is true, they just check out addresses without a license. But I have seen a Youtube video of the detector van technology and I think it does exist and work. They probably have fake vans also, as a deterrent and also use the addresses without TV licenses to target. But if the occupant turns their TV off their is no signal to detect. And I very much doubt they could triangulate their detector to a block of flats. If you had a TV in an isolated farmhouse, it would probably be pretty easy to locate your TV.
Mate of mine is ex-BBC. He told me that "The TV detector van is the Corporation's greatest-ever work of fiction"
 
Steve Punt in his occasional series for Radio 4, Punt PI, looked into the TV detector van some years back.

If I remember rightly, he concluded that while the van(s) clearly existed, the technology on it had never worked.
 
The job is to convey - to tell people what is happening - not to mould to your own ways of thinking. That distinction has been lost, whether it be in something as relatively innocuous* as Country Townie File or news reporting.

*Actually, it’s not innocuous. Farming is important. Anthropomorphising ‘cute little’ badgers and foxes, for instance, is all very well. The realities are different.
FTFY

Badgers are large viscous animals. Foxes are canine cats and like cats kill for fun, not food.
 
Greyhound taking a bit of a chance getting mouthy with Brock. Just as well hound is fleet of foot.

You, on the other hand...
 
Greyhound taking a bit of a chance getting mouthy with Brock. Just as well hound is fleet of foot.

You, on the other hand...
These are town foxes that stare at her, with their heads tilted and then pop over the fence as soon as she moves towards them. This is on a lead, with me on the other end I hasten to add.
If in the garden she barks so much before the door is opened they are long gone.
 
Steve Punt in his occasional series for Radio 4, Punt PI, looked into the TV detector van some years back.

If I remember rightly, he concluded that while the van(s) clearly existed, the technology on it had never worked.
It can work and the technology behind it is used in other spheres.

I can pretty much guarantee however that this is no longer the case for pretty much the majority of the UK




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