Bayonet Frog

#1
Right Party People,

One of our Dark Blue bretheren has asked why is a Bayonet Frog called a Bayonet Frog.

Any takers?
 
#2
pro word NO-wah.

'cos it holds bayonets... init 8O
 
#3
Social_Handgrenade said:
pro word NO-wah.

'cos it holds bayonets... init 8O
But why a frog?
 
#4
StabTiffy2B said:
Social_Handgrenade said:
pro word NO-wah.

'cos it holds bayonets... init 8O
But why a frog?
Its on a need to know basis... As as its them they don't need to know
 
#6
Ah, i see. :oops:

Sorry mate, not a scooby. Maybe someone from QM's might be able to shed some light on it.
 
#7
LMAO! Answer should be fairly clear eh?
 
#8
Why is it called a bayonet-frog? A really good question!

It interests me too, if only for the reason that I had to blanco the fückin' thing so many times.

MsG
 

Alsacien

LE
Moderator
#9
StabTiffy2B said:
Right Party People,

One of our Dark Blue bretheren has asked why is a Bayonet Frog called a Bayonet Frog.

Any takers?
I'm not going to be able to sleep tonight now....horrible memories of trying to get the brass stud in place in the middle without spoiling the whole thing - and torn fingernails.. :x
 
#11
Well the dictionary has the word 'frog' down as this.


(frôg, frg)
n.
1. Any of numerous tailless, aquatic, semiaquatic, or terrestrial amphibians of the order Anura and especially of the family Ranidae, characteristically having a smooth moist skin, webbed feet, and long hind legs adapted for leaping.
2. A wedge-shaped, horny prominence in the sole of a horse's hoof.
3. A loop fastened to a belt to hold a tool or weapon.
4. An ornamental looped braid or cord with a button or knot for fastening the front of a garment.
5. A device on intersecting railroad tracks that permits wheels to cross the junction.
6. A spiked or perforated device used to support stems in a flower arrangement.
7. The nut of a violin bow.
8. Informal Hoarseness or phlegm in the throat.
9. Offensive Slang Used as a disparaging term for a French person.
From Here
 
#13
Probably a British corruption of the foreign term froco which is the loop and button fastening arrangement as used on old uniforms/coats/tunics. Broadened and adapted to many items where something is held in place by pushing it through a holder, i.e. button, sword, bayonet.

No.9
 
#14
No.9 said:
Probably a British corruption of the foreign term froco which is the loop and button fastening arrangement as used on old uniforms/coats/tunics. Broadened and adapted to many items where something is held in place by pushing it through a holder, i.e. button, sword, bayonet.

No.9
Closely related to Frogging:
"Braided fastenings usually looped over a button or braided toggles in the same fabric. Often used in military uniform and traditionally Asian garments." is one definition.
 

ugly

LE
Moderator
#15
Not something used in my old regiment, now they use something called a sword!
 
#16
Re sword, Veteran of the Rifle Brigade told me their order for fix bayonet was still 'fix sword' when he enlisted in the 40's?

No.9
 

ugly

LE
Moderator
#17
No.9 said:
Re sword, Veteran of the Rifle Brigade told me their order for fix bayonet was still 'fix sword' when he enlisted in the 40's?

No.9
Was at RGJ in 1982, confused us poor LI lads who didnt do drill with them. LI drill involved marching at the trail, potentially dangerous with a bayonet attached. I had a few flash eliinator marks on my generous behind during drill if the lad behind me was a touch slow. And thats my story your honour!
 
#18
Hmm.....don't suppose this is connected with the one about it not hurting because 'it belongs to the man behind' ????? :) Naw, wouldn't have a flash eliminator fitted..........then there are some weird barstewards about??? :twisted: :lol:

No.9
 
#19
It's called frog because it once resembled (slightly) the shape of a leaping frog


 
#20
the_butler said:
It's called frog because it once resembled (slightly) the shape of a leaping frog


That's a plausible origin. However, I read years ago that it was originally a "frock-gather" to hold back, or gather, the frocks of military coats to facilitate leg movement. When not in use, it was unofficially used as a handy place to park a bayonet when reloading one's musket. The term was corrupted to "frogather", then "frogger", then "frog" at about the same time as the purpose-made leather holder was introduced. This is purely anecdotal, btw - I've done no research on it, so feel free to pull it to bits.

Cheers,
Cliff.
 

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