Reference Image Battle damage, decay, rust wear and tear

#21
I've posted this elsewhere on the web.

Rust on kit & vehicles in hot & dusty climates. I've seen some fantastic builds of stuff from all eras of operations in the deserts but some are let down by people going to town with lots of rust. In hot arid climates rust doesn't form for long enough to remain. While temps may drop at night & moisture form on surfaces causing a coating of surface rust by the morning, it invariably disappears especially in areas where fine sand can get blown from the winds that are almost constant. As a result a lot of stuff gets almost sandblasted with leading edges etc showing bare metal.
Anyone who has seen the wreckage of Lady Be Good or the wrecks of the trains that T E Lawrence helped to demolish will see how exposed steel looks in a desert environment. Its very much a case of less is more.

Kit & Stowage. The number of times that modellers show the back decks of tanks covered in kit over the engine/cooling grilles just takes away the 'realism' of a kit no matter how good it is. I've got a mate who's an ex-tankie who keeps on about this & he's right. There is also the issue of deck stowage compromising the turret & main gun traverse. No tank crew in potential close contact with an enemy would have their kit thus.
yes, have to agree, some modellers really go to town and turn their depiction of a serving vehicle into something that looks ready for the scrapyard. No crew, unless they're Italian or French would allow such a thing, less is more. It's a classic case of observe, don't just imagine.
 
#22
yes, have to agree, some modellers really go to town and turn their depiction of a serving vehicle into something that looks ready for the scrapyard. No crew, unless they're Italian or French would allow such a thing, less is more. It's a classic case of observe, don't just imagine.
A lot of it is down to melons bumping their armchair based gums with photos showing AFVs stacked with gear on the move, invariably en-route to a battle area. Lets face it, not many blokes were standing by the side of a road waiting to photograph a panzer when there is a load of bangy stuff coming their way. Said armchair choppers take that then as gospel that the wagons would fight like that too.
 
#23
A lot of it is down to melons bumping their armchair based gums with photos showing AFVs stacked with gear on the move, invariably en-route to a battle area. Lets face it, not many blokes were standing by the side of a road waiting to photograph a panzer when there is a load of bangy stuff coming their way. Said armchair choppers take that then as gospel that the wagons would fight like that too.
You can also add into the mix, the never served who tell people that have that their colours/colour scheme is wrong as the manual says...… :)

Time for someone to post his magnolia 432 again :)
 
#24
Bit dusty :)

An Afrikakorps’ VW KdF Kübelwagen Typ 82 near the Akarit defensive line,
An Afrikakorps’ VW KdF Kübelwagen Typ 82 near the Akarit defensive line,.jpg
 
#25
Good pic of the DAK Kubel.
Fitted with the wider 'balloon' type tyres for soft sand by the looks of it.

On the subject of DAK kit & weathering. I've got the old Tamiya Pz ii on the go as a DAK variant circa early 43 so its going to have been around a while. Its been red oxided already. I've added masksing fluid spots & dabs for some wear & tear over which i will spray the grey, then maskol that coat with a finish of desert yellow for its final colour. Intent will be to then weather that back to a somewhat tired looked wagon with exposed dark grey below the yellow with some small areas of primer ensuring it doesn't replicate rust too much as per my previous point.
What i'm in a quandry over is whether to pre-shade before the grey, or over the grey before the yellow. Or to not bother pre-shading at all? Pre shade will be a thin black .
 
#26
Good pic of the DAK Kubel.
Fitted with the wider 'balloon' type tyres for soft sand by the looks of it.

On the subject of DAK kit & weathering. I've got the old Tamiya Pz ii on the go as a DAK variant circa early 43 so its going to have been around a while. Its been red oxided already. I've added masksing fluid spots & dabs for some wear & tear over which i will spray the grey, then maskol that coat with a finish of desert yellow for its final colour. Intent will be to then weather that back to a somewhat tired looked wagon with exposed dark grey below the yellow with some small areas of primer ensuring it doesn't replicate rust too much as per my previous point.
What i'm in a quandry over is whether to pre-shade before the grey, or over the grey before the yellow. Or to not bother pre-shading at all? Pre shade will be a thin black .
Don't think I'd bother with the pre-shading in this case, just lighten the colours depending on the panels placement and wear
 
#28
The "never-served" seem to assume that all aircraft/vehicles/ships are glossy and spotless and remain so. They are, for about five minutes after they leave the paint shed. Then reality sets in, in the form of effects of rain/sun/sand/dirt/stones/boots/accidental damage/water/grease/oil/banged by tools,etc,etc. In my job, an airliner that has been freshly painted will look glossy and shiny for a few months but will soon take on a faded look as the paint suffers the effect of living and working outside for most of it's operational life. Aircraft may look clean from a distance but are actually quite dirty close up and that's from an airline that religiously deep cleans it's aircraft, inside and out, every six to eight weeks. In the case of military vehicles, quite often, they are scruffy because they are busy and don't get a head-to-toe cleaning until a gap arrives in the schedule, often dictated by a visit to the garage. In my experience, the mechs won't accept an unwashed or not cleaned out vehicle and it won't get painted unless it's coming out of a major overhaul.
 
#29
civvy rust :)

IMG_20180929_114424.jpg
 

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