Battalion of Soldiers fail drug tests

#3
I appreciate that it's a random test etc, but just how random is it. Would everybody get tested annually but randomly, or would you expect to have your moistness probed say every 6 months?
 
#4
some comments on the extrapolation:

1) CDT includes reserve, so add a reserve strength (including recruits) of around 30,000 to the 80,000

2) 87,000 tests a year will include any testing at phase 1 training establishments (not sure if this is still done) and these will not be in the 'army' strength you have used above.

3) 87,000 tests will also include any re-shows due to borderline results.

The 'kicked out' figure will include OTC OCdts who have failed in addition to 'normal' Regular and Reserve.
 
#5
I appreciate that it's a random test etc, but just how random is it. Would everybody get tested annually but randomly, or would you expect to have your moistness probed say every 6 months?
No probing involved. Pee in a pot, seal into bags, sent off for testing.

It is completely random, except when not. CO's can request CDT, and people can give tip offs (anonymously) which can lead to CDT. As a unit you never know which it is.

I suspect the CDT on the planned first day of an ex a couple of years ago was a 'tip-off' as someone didn't want to play, and wanted a delayed start.

I've been in the reserves (in various forms) for 15 years and been tested 5 times.
 
#7
No probing involved. Pee in a pot, seal into bags, sent off for testing.

It is completely random, except when not. CO's can request CDT, and people can give tip offs (anonymously) which can lead to CDT. As a unit you never know which it is.

I suspect the CDT on the planned first day of an ex a couple of years ago was a 'tip-off' as someone didn't want to play, and wanted a delayed start.

I've been in the reserves (in various forms) for 15 years and been tested 5 times.
No probing you say...shocking. What's the Army coming to?

Well, at least you're still issued KF shirts, so it can't be all that bad...
 
#11
I am so glad to see the Freedom of Information Act means journo's can just blast for data on Army and Police to support their agenda.

I wonder when we can look forward to stories on BBC staff convictions?
 
#13
Can I just say, I do not tolerate drug abuse or criminality in the Army or Police.

I just find it entertaining that Journalists hold themselves up to be the guardians of morality.
 
#14
I can remember at 3 Penal Division, mid-90s, , where we had a small section of lads who were waiting to be discharged due to drugs. They wore coveralls, and were deployed sweeping the camp and various other crap tasks.
 
#16
Can I just say, I do not tolerate drug abuse or criminality in the Army or Police.

I just find it entertaining that Journalists hold themselves up to be the guardians of morality.
That part of the beeb or other news agencies I have little time for, the page filler pish that's working to someone's preconceptions and they already have the answer, just need the story that fits it.
 
#18
Its also more than 87000 as a baseline - if you include joiners and leavers, then the total pool of people is likely to be nearer double that at a minimum (not sure how many leavers/joiners there are each year).
 
#20
Another fantastic piece of useless journalism from the BBC

So in the last 5 years, 470 soldiers have failed drugs tests.
Based on an Army of 80,000, then 0.5 % have failed.

The article then goes on to say that they carry out 87,000 tests a year. That seems a rather large figure. Would anyone who is involved in CDT like to comment on these figures ?

More soldiers failing drug tests on foreign deployments - BBC News
Bad maths. 80000 (approx annual held strength) x 5 (reference period) = 400,000.
470 failed tests would only equate to around 0.1%. I wonder how that stacks up against similar sized organisations with a zero tolerance policy?
 

Latest Threads