Basilisk Battery, Port Moresby

tiv

LE
The Australians built a 5.25" Dual Purpose Battery to defend Port Moresby. This Guardians of Port Moresby has a short video of the site which still appears to be in excellent condition. Similar batteries were proposed for the UK but only that at Park Battery, South Shields was completed before the idea was dropped.
 

Chef

LE
Amazing, no graffiti.
 
Amazing, no graffiti.
The 'rascals' are too busy robbing and raping tourists to bother about finding spray cans.
 

Chef

LE
The 'rascals' are too busy robbing and raping tourists to bother about finding spray cans.
Round that there London our rascals manage to do all three, the multitasking tinkers that they are.
 
Round that there London our rascals manage to do all three, the multitasking tinkers that they are.
I blame access to public transport!;)
 

Chef

LE
I blame access to public transport!;)
It does look a bit remote on googlemaps, but that's rarely stopped the more enterprising vandals.
 
I've flown into (and out of thankfully) No 1 Airstrip (or Gurney 'Airport') about 20 years ago - most primitive. Magnetic Battery is also worth a look if you find yourself in Queensland:

 

Bad Smell

Clanker
Speaking with my Dad today we visited the gun emplacements back in the 70s. I don't actually remember visiting them but we regularly went to the beaches nearby for the day. I do remember the one on Paga Hill as it was right next to a steep roadway but when looking at the modern development on google maps there I can't readily see it.

This bit here is pure shit, The Batteries were completed in record time, however, they never fired a single shot as the Japanese were prevented from coming to Port Moresby by the American’s in Manus. The US after defeating the Japanese arrived in 1945, and in 1946 the batteries were decommissioned and the guns were removed. Even g**gle couldn't f*ck this info up and I'm not going to waste my time checking.

Manus Island was in Japanese controlled territory and the Allied invasion to retake it was late in the war mainly by Australian forces for the airfield there. A good friend of mine's neighbour was part of that.

The Japanese were prevented from coming to Port Moresby, firstly as a result of the Battle of the Coral Sea in May 1942 and secondly, the land invasion which was fought along the Kokoda Track in which the Japanese came as far as Iriobiowa Ridge and possibly individuals made it to Hombrom Bluff before being forced back. Up until this time it was fought initially by Militia troops and then a combination of AIF and Militia. The only US forces involved at that time were USAAC. Towards the end the US put land forces into the campaign about December 1942.

The first US forces in Papua were Air Corps and they arrived early in 1942 and contributed significantly to the campaign, as difficult as it was. They were a combination of units forced from the Philippines and new units arriving in theatre. The US Fifth Air Force was eventually formed from these units.

I was an associate member of the 39th Bn Association for many years and knew quite a few of the old diggers. Most of them were still teenagers in 1942 and their training had been neglected as they were deployed as garrison troops, spending a lot of time unloading stores from ships in the harbour. One of my grandfathers fought in the campaign towards the end as a CSM in 55/53rd Militia Battalion. His Company Commander, a Captain Henderson was shot down in front of them and is now listed as having an unknown grave.

I first walked across the Kokoda Track as a 15 year old with my Dad. I ended up going over twice, my Dad three times and my brother once. We still have a few odd souvenirs here in Oz from the the Track.
 

tiv

LE
Speaking with my Dad today we visited the gun emplacements back in the 70s. I don't actually remember visiting them but we regularly went to the beaches nearby for the day. I do remember the one on Paga Hill as it was right next to a steep roadway but when looking at the modern development on google maps there I can't readily see it.

This bit here is pure shit, The Batteries were completed in record time, however, they never fired a single shot as the Japanese were prevented from coming to Port Moresby by the American’s in Manus. The US after defeating the Japanese arrived in 1945, and in 1946 the batteries were decommissioned and the guns were removed. Even g**gle couldn't f*ck this info up and I'm not going to waste my time checking.

Manus Island was in Japanese controlled territory and the Allied invasion to retake it was late in the war mainly by Australian forces for the airfield there. A good friend of mine's neighbour was part of that.

The Japanese were prevented from coming to Port Moresby, firstly as a result of the Battle of the Coral Sea in May 1942 and secondly, the land invasion which was fought along the Kokoda Track in which the Japanese came as far as Iriobiowa Ridge and possibly individuals made it to Hombrom Bluff before being forced back. Up until this time it was fought initially by Militia troops and then a combination of AIF and Militia. The only US forces involved at that time were USAAC. Towards the end the US put land forces into the campaign about December 1942.

The first US forces in Papua were Air Corps and they arrived early in 1942 and contributed significantly to the campaign, as difficult as it was. They were a combination of units forced from the Philippines and new units arriving in theatre. The US Fifth Air Force was eventually formed from these units.

I was an associate member of the 39th Bn Association for many years and knew quite a few of the old diggers. Most of them were still teenagers in 1942 and their training had been neglected as they were deployed as garrison troops, spending a lot of time unloading stores from ships in the harbour. One of my grandfathers fought in the campaign towards the end as a CSM in 55/53rd Militia Battalion. His Company Commander, a Captain Henderson was shot down in front of them and is now listed as having an unknown grave.

I first walked across the Kokoda Track as a 15 year old with my Dad. I ended up going over twice, my Dad three times and my brother once. We still have a few odd souvenirs here in Oz from the the Track.
If you haven't done so, I'm sure you would find the site linked at the end of the page Port Moresby - Gun Emplacements of WW2 of interest from your comments.
 
I recently watched a horror film set in the Channel Islands in WW2. There were tunnel sequences set in German bunker tunnels such as those seen in the Ostwall. It turned out however that the tunnels were part of a fort in NZ - v interesting.

 

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