Band of Brothers (probably the 50th thread...)

#1
I decided to watch the series again last week, following a sense of being short-changed by the film "Days of Glory" (another thread). BoB is probably the best WW2 dramatisation ever made, thanks to an inspiring true story, a big budget and an obsession with accuracy.

Alas, my illusions have been shattered.

I was sprawled on the sofa, beer in hand, ready to watch the second Bulge episode - the attack on Foy, coincidentally after reading about the recent death of the then-Lt Speirs (they probably broke the mould after making him).

Early on there is a scene in which one soldier bends over, acting as a map table, and I watched enthralled as the battle plan for the occupation of the woodland and attack on Foy was briefed. Imagine my disappointment when the description of the "logging road leading to Foy" was accompanied by a finger moving down a contour line on the map rather than a logging road!

Standards! :wink:
 
#2
Sorry more BoB goofs:

http://imdb.com/title/tt0185906/goofs

This one is really quite a big goof, but a fascinating one:

Factual errors: In Part Three (Carentan), it is suggested that Albert Blithe was shot in the neck by a sniper, and the credits information states that he died of his wounds in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania in 1948. Fellow Easy Company soldiers had believed this to be true. After the mini-series was broadcast, relatives of Albert Blithe came forward with information and documentation that Blithe was wounded in the right shoulder, recovered from his wounds, attended the 1st Annual Reunion of the 101st Airborne Division Association, and subsequently went on to have an outstanding Army career (including over 600 parachute jumps and a MAAG assignment in Taiwan). Blithe actually died in 1967 while on active duty in Germany, and was buried in Arlington National Cemetery with full military honors.
 
#4
I have to say if thats the worst that IMDB's contributors can come up with for 8 hours or show (or so) then I am not worried...

Anachronisms: Episode 5: The British para commander is referred to as a brigadier-general and is wearing a general officer's cap badge. There has been no such rank in the British Army since the 1920s. The equivalent, brigadier, is not a general officer and wears a different cap badge.


Continuity: Pvt. Christensen's machine gun switches from left to right shoulders when Capt. Sobel confronts him about disobeying orders on a night march.


Factual errors: In Part Three (Carentan), it is suggested that Albert Blithe was shot in the neck by a sniper, and the credits information states that he died of his wounds in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania in 1948. Fellow Easy Company soldiers had believed this to be true. After the mini-series was broadcast, relatives of Albert Blithe came forward with information and documentation that Blithe was wounded in the right shoulder, recovered from his wounds, attended the 1st Annual Reunion of the 101st Airborne Division Association, and subsequently went on to have an outstanding Army career (including over 600 parachute jumps and a MAAG assignment in Taiwan). Blithe actually died in 1967 while on active duty in Germany, and was buried in Arlington National Cemetery with full military honors.


Revealing mistakes: In "Crossroads", when Winters types the report a close-up of the keys show that, even though he is typing the correct letters, the typewriter's shift lock is not on, therefore the words he is typing should be lower case, but the next shot show the all caps title of his report.


Continuity: At the end of "Crossroads" when Winters is talking to Nixon, the bayonet in Winters' belt disappears and reappears between shots.


Factual errors: In the Bastgone episode, General McAuliffe utters a profanity. General McAuliffe did not use profanity.


Revealing mistakes: In the episode where Easy is rescuing the British soldiers, Bull Randelman is seen in the extreme foreground. He is in a boat paddling along with the rest of the soldiers, but he does not have a paddle in his hands.


Anachronisms: Episode 1 - As the first C-47 takes off toward France, you can see the pilot is wearing a modern light green plastic headset instead of the Black rubber earcup type of that era.


Anachronisms: Episode 1: when the C-47's are taking off for France, some high-altitude aircraft contrails can be seen. It is unlikely that these were from high-altitude heavy bombers on their way to Normandy, since there were too few of them, and they were not in formation.


Boom mic visible: In "Currahee", when Luz is imitating Maj. Horton to fool Capt. Sobel, the boom mike is reflected in the wet helmets.


Continuity: When the troops entering the city of Carentan they're being attacked by a German M42 from a window and so fire back. During this exchange, bullet-holes appear and disappear on the advertisement-sign attached to the house.


Continuity: In "Points", when they are hunting for food in the woods, the distance between Bull Randleman's hands on his riffle varies between shots.


Revealing mistakes: In "Bastogne". In the end of the episode, when Doc Roe is returning and gives 'Babe' Heffron the bandage on his hand, he has a shadow on either side. The shadows are visible in the second shot in the woods just before he passes the two men talking and Winters' foxhole.


Continuity: In "Crossroads" when Luz is doing his "Got a penny?" imitation, his cigarette jumps between his hands. Just before the close-up of his face he lifts his left hand, then in the close-up he's smoking the cigarette from his right hand.


Revealing mistakes: In episode 2 when the men take position near the second artillery cannon, one of the soldiers takes aim with an opened bolt of his M1 Garand, indicating that the weapon is not loaded.


Continuity: In Episode 4, "Replacements", Les Hashey sees a medic shot by a German in the left leg. When we next see the medic he is holding his right leg and bleeding from it badly, and his left leg is in fine shape.


Continuity: In "The Last Patrol", Don Malarkey has the stripes of a staff sergeant in the morning, but wears the stripes of a sergeant first class as the men prepare for the patrol.


Continuity: In Episode 7 "The Breaking Point" after Joe Toye finishes talking with Winters about how he wants to head back on the line, there is a close up of his face with his Thompson in the upright position on his shoulders, but in the next shot when he goes to talk to Bill Guarnere, the Thompson is being carried upside down


Revealing mistakes: In the beginning of the 4th episode (Replacements) Buck Compton and Babe Heffron are playing a game of darts. To finish, Babe says he needs "double seven". He throws and apparently wins the game, but the arrow hits "treble seven", instead of double, indicating that he didn't win (yet).


Continuity: In "Why We Fight", the jacket worn by Private Webster changes from that of a staff sergeant to a private in subsequent scenes.


Continuity: In "The Breaking Point", Hoobler shoots the German officer (on horseback) in the head an kills him. However, while falling off the horse, the German soldier's helmet comes off and he grabs his head. A few shots later, his helmet is back on.


Continuity: Episode 1: When Easy Company is eating their spaghetti lunch we can see that outside it is raining. In the next scene while running up Currahee, the ground is dry, showing no sign of the previous rain storm.


Continuity: In episode 4, "Replacements", the allied forces throw a rocket at the Dutch restaurant, leaving a huge hole in it. Still, they are forced to retreat. Afterwards, we see the victorious Germans in front of the restaurant with no sign of the previous damage.


Factual errors: In the last episode, Richard Winters is telling about the lives of the men of Easy Company after the war. You hear him say that Frank Perconte died 1998. That's wrong. He joined the Easy Company reunion in 2002.


Factual errors: In the second episode, a lighter can be seen that doesn't exist at this time. Till 1943, Zippos where made of chrome and had round corners. In 1943, they had to change from chrome to black paint for their standard lighters which were given to soldiers.


Continuity: In Episode 1, the two times Lt. Meehan is telling Easy Company that the invasion has been postponed, his tone of voice and hand movements are different both times, when they are supposed to be the same moment.


Crew or equipment visible: In episode 4 "Replacements", when Sgt. Randleman crawls away from the damaged US tank which is chasing him, when the tank is seen from behind, two crew members are visible walking along the right side of the tank, partly hidden by some bushes.


Miscellaneous: In part 6 ( Bastogne ) Lipton runs past Eugene Roe saying "Its gonna get busy, buddy,". A fly can be seen crawling on top of Roe's helmet despite the freezing winter cold.


Anachronisms: One of the characters says "Get the Hell Out of Dodge". This phrase did not come into use until 1955 when used in the Television show Gunsmoke.


Factual errors: In episode 9 "Why We Fight", Lewis Nixon talks to his men on a day dated as April 11th and tells them that Hitler committed suicide in Berlin. Hitler actually shot himself on April 30th.


Factual errors: In the first episode, the mess hall had a Vendo 39 Coke machine in it. The time line for this part of the movie was 1943 but the Vendo 39 model was not produced until 1949.


Factual errors: When the 101st Airborne was sent into Belgium just before the Battle of the Buldge they were ordered to remove the screaming eagle patch from their uniforms, so the Germans would not know they were facing an elite division. It was only after the Battle when they moved into Hagenau that they were able to wear the patches again.


Factual errors: Just after O'Keefe joins the unit, he is seen walking with Perconte to their assigned guard post. Perconte is wearing paratrooper boots; O'Keefe should also be wearing paratrooper boots but is wearing combat boots.


Anachronisms: In part one Currahee, Lt. Sobel examines the "rusty bayonet" of Liebgott. This was 1942, the bayonet was a Model M1. This bayonet was not manufactured until after March 1943. It had a ten inch blade. The bayonets that should have been used in 1942, were the Model 1905 or the 1905/42 both of which had 16 inch blades. After March of '43, all the long Garand bayonets were ordered to be cut down to ten inches and became the 1905E-1 and new 10 inch bayonets (the M1 bayonet) were manufactured for the rest of the war.


Continuity: In episode 1, Robert Strayer is (correctly) wearing the rank insignia of a major when Easy Company is celebrating its paratrooper qualification. Between that time and Winters' court-martial incident, Strayer had been promoted to lieutenant colonel (and Winters refers to him as such). On D-Day (in episode 2) just prior to the attack on the 105mm guns at Brecourt Manor, Winters and another officer refer to Strayer as a Major. He had been an LTC long enough to rule out a slip of the tongue, especially by two different officers.
 
#5
I have to say if thats the worst that IMDB's contributors can come up with for 8 hours or show (or so) then I am not worried...

Anachronisms: Episode 5: The British para commander is referred to as a brigadier-general and is wearing a general officer's cap badge. There has been no such rank in the British Army since the 1920s. The equivalent, brigadier, is not a general officer and wears a different cap badge.


Continuity: Pvt. Christensen's machine gun switches from left to right shoulders when Capt. Sobel confronts him about disobeying orders on a night march.


Factual errors: In Part Three (Carentan), it is suggested that Albert Blithe was shot in the neck by a sniper, and the credits information states that he died of his wounds in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania in 1948. Fellow Easy Company soldiers had believed this to be true. After the mini-series was broadcast, relatives of Albert Blithe came forward with information and documentation that Blithe was wounded in the right shoulder, recovered from his wounds, attended the 1st Annual Reunion of the 101st Airborne Division Association, and subsequently went on to have an outstanding Army career (including over 600 parachute jumps and a MAAG assignment in Taiwan). Blithe actually died in 1967 while on active duty in Germany, and was buried in Arlington National Cemetery with full military honors.


Revealing mistakes: In "Crossroads", when Winters types the report a close-up of the keys show that, even though he is typing the correct letters, the typewriter's shift lock is not on, therefore the words he is typing should be lower case, but the next shot show the all caps title of his report.


Continuity: At the end of "Crossroads" when Winters is talking to Nixon, the bayonet in Winters' belt disappears and reappears between shots.


Factual errors: In the Bastgone episode, General McAuliffe utters a profanity. General McAuliffe did not use profanity.


Revealing mistakes: In the episode where Easy is rescuing the British soldiers, Bull Randelman is seen in the extreme foreground. He is in a boat paddling along with the rest of the soldiers, but he does not have a paddle in his hands.


Anachronisms: Episode 1 - As the first C-47 takes off toward France, you can see the pilot is wearing a modern light green plastic headset instead of the Black rubber earcup type of that era.


Anachronisms: Episode 1: when the C-47's are taking off for France, some high-altitude aircraft contrails can be seen. It is unlikely that these were from high-altitude heavy bombers on their way to Normandy, since there were too few of them, and they were not in formation.


Boom mic visible: In "Currahee", when Luz is imitating Maj. Horton to fool Capt. Sobel, the boom mike is reflected in the wet helmets.


Continuity: When the troops entering the city of Carentan they're being attacked by a German M42 from a window and so fire back. During this exchange, bullet-holes appear and disappear on the advertisement-sign attached to the house.


Continuity: In "Points", when they are hunting for food in the woods, the distance between Bull Randleman's hands on his riffle varies between shots.


Revealing mistakes: In "Bastogne". In the end of the episode, when Doc Roe is returning and gives 'Babe' Heffron the bandage on his hand, he has a shadow on either side. The shadows are visible in the second shot in the woods just before he passes the two men talking and Winters' foxhole.


Continuity: In "Crossroads" when Luz is doing his "Got a penny?" imitation, his cigarette jumps between his hands. Just before the close-up of his face he lifts his left hand, then in the close-up he's smoking the cigarette from his right hand.


Revealing mistakes: In episode 2 when the men take position near the second artillery cannon, one of the soldiers takes aim with an opened bolt of his M1 Garand, indicating that the weapon is not loaded.


Continuity: In Episode 4, "Replacements", Les Hashey sees a medic shot by a German in the left leg. When we next see the medic he is holding his right leg and bleeding from it badly, and his left leg is in fine shape.


Continuity: In "The Last Patrol", Don Malarkey has the stripes of a staff sergeant in the morning, but wears the stripes of a sergeant first class as the men prepare for the patrol.


Continuity: In Episode 7 "The Breaking Point" after Joe Toye finishes talking with Winters about how he wants to head back on the line, there is a close up of his face with his Thompson in the upright position on his shoulders, but in the next shot when he goes to talk to Bill Guarnere, the Thompson is being carried upside down


Revealing mistakes: In the beginning of the 4th episode (Replacements) Buck Compton and Babe Heffron are playing a game of darts. To finish, Babe says he needs "double seven". He throws and apparently wins the game, but the arrow hits "treble seven", instead of double, indicating that he didn't win (yet).


Continuity: In "Why We Fight", the jacket worn by Private Webster changes from that of a staff sergeant to a private in subsequent scenes.


Continuity: In "The Breaking Point", Hoobler shoots the German officer (on horseback) in the head an kills him. However, while falling off the horse, the German soldier's helmet comes off and he grabs his head. A few shots later, his helmet is back on.


Continuity: Episode 1: When Easy Company is eating their spaghetti lunch we can see that outside it is raining. In the next scene while running up Currahee, the ground is dry, showing no sign of the previous rain storm.


Continuity: In episode 4, "Replacements", the allied forces throw a rocket at the Dutch restaurant, leaving a huge hole in it. Still, they are forced to retreat. Afterwards, we see the victorious Germans in front of the restaurant with no sign of the previous damage.


Factual errors: In the last episode, Richard Winters is telling about the lives of the men of Easy Company after the war. You hear him say that Frank Perconte died 1998. That's wrong. He joined the Easy Company reunion in 2002.


Factual errors: In the second episode, a lighter can be seen that doesn't exist at this time. Till 1943, Zippos where made of chrome and had round corners. In 1943, they had to change from chrome to black paint for their standard lighters which were given to soldiers.


Continuity: In Episode 1, the two times Lt. Meehan is telling Easy Company that the invasion has been postponed, his tone of voice and hand movements are different both times, when they are supposed to be the same moment.


Crew or equipment visible: In episode 4 "Replacements", when Sgt. Randleman crawls away from the damaged US tank which is chasing him, when the tank is seen from behind, two crew members are visible walking along the right side of the tank, partly hidden by some bushes.


Miscellaneous: In part 6 ( Bastogne ) Lipton runs past Eugene Roe saying "Its gonna get busy, buddy,". A fly can be seen crawling on top of Roe's helmet despite the freezing winter cold.


Anachronisms: One of the characters says "Get the Hell Out of Dodge". This phrase did not come into use until 1955 when used in the Television show Gunsmoke.


Factual errors: In episode 9 "Why We Fight", Lewis Nixon talks to his men on a day dated as April 11th and tells them that Hitler committed suicide in Berlin. Hitler actually shot himself on April 30th.


Factual errors: In the first episode, the mess hall had a Vendo 39 Coke machine in it. The time line for this part of the movie was 1943 but the Vendo 39 model was not produced until 1949.


Factual errors: When the 101st Airborne was sent into Belgium just before the Battle of the Buldge they were ordered to remove the screaming eagle patch from their uniforms, so the Germans would not know they were facing an elite division. It was only after the Battle when they moved into Hagenau that they were able to wear the patches again.


Factual errors: Just after O'Keefe joins the unit, he is seen walking with Perconte to their assigned guard post. Perconte is wearing paratrooper boots; O'Keefe should also be wearing paratrooper boots but is wearing combat boots.


Anachronisms: In part one Currahee, Lt. Sobel examines the "rusty bayonet" of Liebgott. This was 1942, the bayonet was a Model M1. This bayonet was not manufactured until after March 1943. It had a ten inch blade. The bayonets that should have been used in 1942, were the Model 1905 or the 1905/42 both of which had 16 inch blades. After March of '43, all the long Garand bayonets were ordered to be cut down to ten inches and became the 1905E-1 and new 10 inch bayonets (the M1 bayonet) were manufactured for the rest of the war.


Continuity: In episode 1, Robert Strayer is (correctly) wearing the rank insignia of a major when Easy Company is celebrating its paratrooper qualification. Between that time and Winters' court-martial incident, Strayer had been promoted to lieutenant colonel (and Winters refers to him as such). On D-Day (in episode 2) just prior to the attack on the 105mm guns at Brecourt Manor, Winters and another officer refer to Strayer as a Major. He had been an LTC long enough to rule out a slip of the tongue, especially by two different officers.
 
#6
Continuity errors and discrepancies there may be, it's still one of the best bits of TV ever.
 

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