Ban pointy things !

Are these buggers insane ?

  • Yes, barking.

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Sort of, they are more than slightly hoplophobic.

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • No, this is the best idea for a new law since...

    Votes: 0 0.0%

  • Total voters
    0

Cutaway

LE
Kit Reviewer
#1
My apologies if this has been posted elsewhere, I've had a bit of a squint and couldn't see it.


Has the nanny state just taken yet another step towards the padded cell, or do we really need this legislation ?

http://newsbox.msn.co.uk/article.as...ortlive&ks=0&mc=5&ml=ma&lc=en&ae=windows-1252

Reuters said:
Ban long, pointed kitchen knives, say doctors

LONDON, My (Reuters) - A group of doctors called on Friday for a ban on the sale of long, pointed kitchen knives which are used in up to half of all stabbings.

"Many assaults are impulsive ... and the long pointed kitchen knife is an easily available potentially lethal weapon, particularly in the domestic setting," Dr Emma Hern and colleagues at West Middlesex University Hospital in London said in the British Medical Journal.

Long knives were traditionally used to spear meat and lift it from the plate to the mouth but times and table manners have changed. When the researchers surveyed 10 chefs, none gave a reason why a long pointed knife was essential. Short ones were just as good.

A leading manufacturer of knives was also at a loss to say why long pointed knives were needed and admitted its designs are based on traditional shapes.

If a ban is enforced, the researchers believe it would reduce the availability of the knives over the next few years.

"We suggest that banning the sale of long pointed knives is a sensible and practical measure," they added.
 
#3
5000 grannies are being canvased over a 6 month period with the top one hundred
"you'll have someones eye out with that"
objects being fazed out over the next 12 months with a further 3 month amnesty for any discarded cucumber sandwiches or rolled up socks that missed the first round of culls. :lol:
 
#5
Bury 'em deep I suppose :roll:
Or find one of the loonies that came up with the notion and stab him.
 
#6
This attitude reminds me of that 'witch' scene at the beginning of Monty Python's Quest for the Holy Grail - "she's a WITCH - BURN 'ER" / "it might be dangerous - BAN IT" see?
 
#7
Which long pointy knives are they talking about. Any chef will explain to you the different knife shapes for different tasks. Perhaps they asked the chefs from the local veggie restaurant.
 
#8
I believe there is a point at wich a righteous person needs to say "no, sorry, your law is wrong and I will not observe it" not actually sure if I'd be that motivated over knives (although I've got a few choice examples of cutlery that I'd not be keen on giving up). The ID card issue is one over which I'd be prepared to go to jail or emigrate.

I can think of few, if any reasons to stay in the UK aside from the rather lame "familiarity" thing and an increasingly misplaced love of country.
 
#9
It is becoming laughable now, how long before hammers and screwdrivers are banned as they can/have been used in assaults :roll:

What about knitting needles, them next :?

Where is it going to stop :roll:
 
#10
Cutaway said:
Reuters said:
Ban long, pointed kitchen knives, say doctors

LONDON, My (Reuters) - A group of doctors called on Friday for a ban on the sale of long, pointed kitchen knives which are used in up to half of all stabbings.
Next on the list is the banning of water and other liquids that may be used to drown someone. This will be closely followed by the removal of 'anything small' that may be a choking hazard.
 
#11
There was a woman on telly this morning from one of the (prepare for UnPC term) "battered women's societys" who asked about screw drivers, knitting needles and "items of furniture" which she reckoned were as, if not more, dangerous.
 
#12
Biscuits_Brown said:
There was a woman on telly this morning from one of the (prepare for UnPC term) "battered women's societys" who asked about screw drivers, knitting needles and "items of furniture" which she reckoned were as, if not more, dangerous.
Thanks for confirming my thoughts B_B
 
#13
BlackHand said:
Cutaway said:
Reuters said:
Ban long, pointed kitchen knives, say doctors

LONDON, My (Reuters) - A group of doctors called on Friday for a ban on the sale of long, pointed kitchen knives which are used in up to half of all stabbings.
Next on the list is the banning of water and other liquids that may be used to drown someone. This will be closely followed by the removal of 'anything small' that may be a choking hazard.
If you purchase sterile/chemically pure water for scientific/medical purposes it will come accompanied with a "SAFETY DATA SHEET"
 
#14
Actually Dui-Lai, she came over as being, if not actually opposed to any ban being unconvinced of utility to it.
 
#15
Biscuits_Brown said:
I believe there is a point at wich a righteous person needs to say "no, sorry, your law is wrong and I will not observe it" not actually sure if I'd be that motivated over knives (although I've got a few choice examples of cutlery that I'd not be keen on giving up). The ID card issue is one over which I'd be prepared to go to jail or emigrate.

I can think of few, if any reasons to stay in the UK aside from the rather lame "familiarity" thing and an increasingly misplaced love of country.
What is so wrong with the ID card issue???

I'm setting up a new thread to discuss this issue as it really grates me!!!
 
#17
It's been deabated at some length.
I have only one response.
I shan't be having one.
 
#18
I thought that most blokes that had a thing for knocking the wife about tended to use the fists.

If that's the case, then the only solution is to round up the entire male population and encase their hands in basketball sized, bubble-wrap mittens.

Now, when he gets home and decides to 'put a few lumps' on the missus, the punches simply won't hurt. In fact, the paggering will be so ineffective, the recipient will be able to do a Rocky to Clubber Lang impression with each dig, "YOU AIN'T SO BAAAD, YOU AIN'T SO BAAAD."

The down side, of course will be that all arrse/nose picking will have to be done for you.

Actually that's an upside.

Everyones a winner!!!!!
 
#19
im_a_mong_cpl said:
Biscuits_Brown said:
I believe there is a point at wich a righteous person needs to say "no, sorry, your law is wrong and I will not observe it" not actually sure if I'd be that motivated over knives (although I've got a few choice examples of cutlery that I'd not be keen on giving up). The ID card issue is one over which I'd be prepared to go to jail or emigrate.

I can think of few, if any reasons to stay in the UK aside from the rather lame "familiarity" thing and an increasingly misplaced love of country.
What is so wrong with the ID card issue???

I'm setting up a new thread to discuss this issue as it really grates me!!!
It is a fundamental principle of the freedom, which we have signed up to defend as part of our ‘unlimited liability’ contract, and our forebears, in vast droves, fought and died to protect that, the Englishman (and I’ll push the point and extend it to the rest of the citizens of this country) is innocent until actually proven guilty. [There are exceptions to this obviously, speed cameras, internment for terror suspects, congestion charging photos – but it is educational to look up the generally held view on all these things from those who have a part to play in the protection of the system – and they are fairly similar.]

The majority of us (Arrsers) carry an ID Card anyway – it is not a fundamental rejection of the concept of identity – rather that the MoD90 is a statement of status, a sign of our choice to defend the nature of our society; not, absolutely not, a symbol of our imposed subservience to the whims of those who run that system which has in turn imposed itself over our society.

The areas of life which stand to be positively affected by the introduction of biometric identity data-warehousing are restricted to those areas where there are already significant layers of information security. If the banks and financial institutions wish to add biometric data to our credit and debit cards then it is for them to sell us the idea as a part of their business. [Barclays, during the latter part of the last decade trialled the use of iris scanning technology and it was utterly rejected by their customer sample as being too invasive.] Since, probably as a sop to potential Labour rebels, there will be no requirement to carry the thing anyway, the majority of criminal activity will remain unaffected and, to be fair, would be unaffected even if it had to be carried.

Consider; as “the overall estimated 10-year cost of the project [has now grown] from £3.1bn to £ 5.8 bn.” [http://news.independent.co.uk/uk/politics/story.jsp?story=641731], and industry works for profit, in whose interest is this scheme really? Who is making the money? What strings connect the decision makers and the money makers?
 
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