Ban on coal and " wet " wood for use in wood burners and fireplaces

If it burns it goes on the multi fuel stove I have. I don't give a fcuk what it is as long as it burns.
Coal, wood, treated or untreated doesn't matter. As long as those orange flames are present and it's banging out the heat I couldn't give a shit.
 
In North America, we have a unit of measurement for firewood called a "cord"

View attachment 451401

A proper cord of wood is 4' tall x 4' wide x 8' long, and in my neck of the woods a cord of properly seasoned hardwood like birch, ash, and maple runs about $75, delivered.
Jesus, thats cheap.
 

Chef

LE
Luckily plastic burns well and that will save Polar penguins from being strangled by David Attenborough for his blue planet films.
 
I mentioned some time ago, we moved into this house two years ago.The gas people wanted £100,000 to bring gas some 400 metres from the pipe in the main road.So like all of our neighbours we went for oil fired heating.
The recent storms meant no power for several hours, so no heating.
We have a wood burner, and that kept us warm, and boiled a kettle as and when we needed it.No idea what we would have done without our log supply.
 

goodoldboy

MIA
Book Reviewer
In North America, we have a unit of measurement for firewood called a "cord"

View attachment 451401

A proper cord of wood is 4' tall x 4' wide x 8' long, and in my neck of the woods a cord of properly seasoned hardwood like birch, ash, and maple runs about $75, delivered.
As has been said already, we used 'cord' for a stack of wood for burning but now use a cubic metre commercially (but still call it cordwood). Last year my nephew in affluent south Buckinghamshire said he paid £135 a cu m for seasoned ash but I heard that it's a bit lower this year.

What I can't understand is why folk (yuppies) buy kiln dried burning wood because it takes energy to dry it when the buyers think they are saving the planet!

In any event, wood should always warm you three times; when you fell or gather it, when you split and stack it and then when you burn it! Happy days...
 

goodoldboy

MIA
Book Reviewer
If it burns it goes on the multi fuel stove I have. I don't give a fcuk what it is as long as it burns.
Coal, wood, treated or untreated doesn't matter. As long as those orange flames are present and it's banging out the heat I couldn't give a shit.
Just make sure your chimney or flue doesn't get clogged. My house insurance requires me to have a certificate from the sweep every year.
 
I guess the Rozzers will soon be issued with moisture meters and pollution testing kits , good job they are over staffed with plenty of free time.
From what I hear, it’s ramblers that dob you in to the council. Don’t take chances - get hold of that map case and choke them, then hang them on a stile so it looks like an accident...
 

Happy to help. (News article from 2018)
The article refers to two issues - one about WHO concerns about air quality and the other about the European Commission taking action about nitrogen dioxide which are not the products of combustion. There's no dictat from the EU about domestic solid fuels.
 

Goatman

ADC
Book Reviewer
Pssst? Wanna buy an eighth* of coal?

* of a ton
try that down in the Forest of Dean, in a pub in Cinderford for preference.....

They'll peg you out in the graveyard for the wild boar :)
 
What about those of us who live out in the sticks and have coal fires from when the house was built? What is special about this approved coal? Low Carbon?

As for wood, will they ban bonfires?
Two points

1. I believe this matter was discussed somewhat in the well known children's tome of The 3 Little pigs, where houses made of sticks were deemed unsuitable for dwelling and only actually approved by animals of the Canis Lupus kind.

2. Low Carbon coal? I believe this is otherwise known as "wood" that has not been buried very deep or long.

RM
 
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The article refers to two issues - one about WHO concerns about air quality and the other about the European Commission taking action about nitrogen dioxide which are not the products of combustion. There's no dictat from the EU about domestic solid fuels.
Neither is of any concern anymore to the UK, the WHO on the other hand could be.
 

Blogg

LE
I use the approved coal. They’re smokeless brickets. I stopped using coal in my dual fuel log burner and started using these instead. They create less soot, burn hotter and last longer than coal, although they’re a bit more expensive. About 50p per kilo for the good stuff.

I banked my fire up at four in the afternoon the other night. Came back from work at five the following day, gave the grate a good shake to get rid of the ash and low and behold I’ve still got burning embers in the grate. A few sticks of kindling and away you go.I’ve never had a coal fire last 24 hours
If you have the storage capacity bulk buying makes a big difference.

Last time I checked could get quality smokeless manufactured fuels for around 25p-30p ker kg delivered but that was whole pallets: 40x 25kg, or 98x 10kg depending on brand, no doubt to be dumped in the most inconvenient spot possible
 
I have been thinking out of the ( wooden box ) I cant decide on developing a chimney particulate filter or going down the afterburner route, what the heck I'm in Scotland must go need to throw another policymaker on the log burner !
 

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