Ballymurphy Massacre Anniversary

#1
How much of this is true, conjecture or fabrication?

"On the 9th of August 1971, at roughly 8:30pm, in the Springfield Park area of West Belfast, a local man was trying to lift children to safety when he was shot and wounded by the British Army’s Parachute Regiment. Local people tried to help the wounded man but were pinned back by the Parachute Regiment’s gunfire. Local parish priest, Father Hugh Mullan, telephoned the Henry Taggart army post to tell them he was going into the field to help the injured man.

Father Mullan entered the field, waving a white baby grow. He anointed the injured man, named locally as Bobby Clarke. Having identified that Bobby had received a flesh wound and was not fatally wounded, Father Mullan attempted to leave the field. At this point Father Mullan was fatally shot in the back.

On witnessing such events another young man of 19 years, Frank Quinn, came out of his place of safety to help Father Mullan. Frank was shot in the back of the head as he tried to reach Father Mullan. The bodies of Father Hugh Mullan and Frank Quinn lay where they were shot until local people could safely reach them. Their bodies remained in neighbouring homes until they could be safely removed the next morning.

Tension was rising in the community as local youths fought back against the army’s horrendous campaign. Families were fleeing their homes in Springfield park as they came under attack from loyalist mobs approaching from the direction of Springmartin. Parents frantically searched for their children. Local men were still being removed from their homes, beaten and interned without reason. All this and at the same time the people of Ballymurphy were trying to live a normal life.
Local people had started gathering at the bottom of Springfield Park, an area known locally as the Manse. Some of those gathering included Joseph Murphy who was returning from the wake of a local boy who drowned in a swimming accident. Joan Connolly and her neighbour Anna Breen stopped as they searched for their daughters. Daniel Teggart also stopped as he returned from his brother’s house which was close to Springfield Park. Daniel had gone to his brother’s house to check on his brother’s safety as his house had been attacked as local youth targeted the Henry Taggart Army base located near by. Noel Phillips, a young man of 19 years, having just finished work walked to Springfield park to check on the local situation.

Without warning the British Army opened fire from the direct of the Henry Taggart Army base. The shooting was aimed directly at the gathering. In the panic people dispersed in all directions. Many people took refuge in a field directly opposite the army base. The army continued to fire and intensified their attack on this field.

Noel Phillips was shot in the back side. An injury that was later described in his autopsy as a flesh wound. As he lay crying for help, Joan Connolly, a mother of 8 went to his aid. Eye witnesses heard Joan call out to Noel saying “It’s alright son, I’m coming to you”.

In her attempt to aid Noel, Joan was shot in the face. When the gun fire stopped Noel Phillips, Joan Connolly, Joseph Murphy and many others lay wounded. Daniel Teggart, a father of 14, lay dead having been shot 14 times.

A short time later a British Army vehicle left the Henry Taggart Army base and entered the field. A solider exited the vehicle, and to the dismay of the local eye witnesses, executed the already wounded Noel Phillips by shooting him once behind each ear with a hand gun.

Soldiers then began lifting the wounded and dead and throwing them into the back of the vehicle. Joseph Murphy, who had been shot once in the leg, was also lifted along with the other victims and taken to the Henry Taggart Army base. Those lifted, including Joseph Murphy, were severely beaten. Soldiers brutally punched and kicked the victims. Soldiers jumped off bunks on top of victims and aggravated the victims’ existing wounds by forcing objects in to them. Mr Murphy was shot at close range with a rubber bullet into the wound he first received in the field. Mr Murphy died three weeks later from his injuries.

Joan Connolly, who had not been lifted by the soldiers when they first entered the field, lay wounded where she had been shot. Eye witnesses claimed Joan cried out for help for many hours. Joan was eventually removed from the field around 2:30am on 10th August. Autopsy reports state that Joan, having been repeatedly shot and bled to death.

10th August 1971

Eddie Doherty, a father of two from the St James’ area of West Belfast, had visited his elderly parents in the Turf Lodge area, on the evening of Tuesday 10th August to check on their safety during the ongoing unrest. He was making his way home along the Whiterock road, as he approached the West Rock area he noticed a barricade which had been erected by local people in an attempt to restrict access to the British Army.

A local man named Billy Whelan, known to Eddie, stopped him and the pair passed commented on the ongoing trouble. At the same time a British Army digger and Saracen moved in to dismantle the barricade. From the digger, a soldier from the Parachute Regiment opened fire. Eddie was fatally shot in the back. Local people carried him to neighbouring homes in an attempt to provide medical attention but Eddie died a short time later from a single gun shot wound.

11th August 1971

At roughly 4am on 11th August. John Laverty, a local man of 20 years, was shot and killed by soldiers from the British Army’s Parachute regiment. Joseph Corr, a local father of 6, was also shot and wounded by the same regiment. Mr Corr died of his injuries 16 days later. The Parachute Regiment’s account stated that both men were firing at the army and were killed as the army responded. Neither men were armed and ballistic and forensic evidence tested at the time disproved the army’s testimony.

Pat McCarthy, a local community worker who came to work in Ballymurphy from England, was shot in the hand on the same day as he was attempting to leave the local community centre to distribute milk and bread to neighbouring families. A few hours later and nursing his wounded hand, Pat decided to continue with the deliveries. He was stopped by soldiers from the British Army’s Parachute Regiment who harassed and beat him.

Eye witness’ watched in horror as the soldiers carried out a mock execution on Pat by placing a gun in his mouth and pulling the trigger, only for the gun to be unloaded. Pat suffered a massive heart attack and the same soldiers stopped local people from trying to help Pat. As a result Pat died from the ordeal.

John McKerr, a father of 8 and a carpenter from the Andersonstown Road area, was carrying out repair work in Corpus Christi chapel on the 11th August. John took a short break to allow the funeral of a local boy, who drowned in a swimming accident, to take place. As he waited outside the chapel for the funeral mass to end, John was shot once in the head by a British solider from the Army’s Parachute Regiment.

Despite the harassment of the British Army, local people went to his aid and remained at his side until an ambulance arrived. One local woman, named locally as Maureen Heath, argued with the soldiers as they refused to allow John to be taken in the ambulance. John was eventually taken to hospital but died of his injuries 9 days later having never regained consciousness."
 
#2
The usual republican 'Bayoneting Babies' level of propaganda with every casualty cowardly shot in the back by the hated paratroopers whilst protecting children. Casualties 'named locally' and therefore may never have existed.
Not even Corbyn would believe it, even though he would swear it was true because he saw it with his own eyes, photographed it, but Boots lost the film/Paras stole his camera.
 
#3
How much of this is true, conjecture or fabrication?

"On the 9th of August 1971, at roughly 8:30pm, in the Springfield Park area of West Belfast, a local man was trying to lift children to safety when he was shot and wounded by the British Army’s Parachute Regiment. Local people tried to help the wounded man but were pinned back by the Parachute Regiment’s gunfire. Local parish priest, Father Hugh Mullan, telephoned the Henry Taggart army post to tell them he was going into the field to help the injured man.

Father Mullan entered the field, waving a white baby grow. He anointed the injured man, named locally as Bobby Clarke. Having identified that Bobby had received a flesh wound and was not fatally wounded, Father Mullan attempted to leave the field. At this point Father Mullan was fatally shot in the back.

On witnessing such events another young man of 19 years, Frank Quinn, came out of his place of safety to help Father Mullan. Frank was shot in the back of the head as he tried to reach Father Mullan. The bodies of Father Hugh Mullan and Frank Quinn lay where they were shot until local people could safely reach them. Their bodies remained in neighbouring homes until they could be safely removed the next morning.

Tension was rising in the community as local youths fought back against the army’s horrendous campaign. Families were fleeing their homes in Springfield park as they came under attack from loyalist mobs approaching from the direction of Springmartin. Parents frantically searched for their children. Local men were still being removed from their homes, beaten and interned without reason. All this and at the same time the people of Ballymurphy were trying to live a normal life.
Local people had started gathering at the bottom of Springfield Park, an area known locally as the Manse. Some of those gathering included Joseph Murphy who was returning from the wake of a local boy who drowned in a swimming accident. Joan Connolly and her neighbour Anna Breen stopped as they searched for their daughters. Daniel Teggart also stopped as he returned from his brother’s house which was close to Springfield Park. Daniel had gone to his brother’s house to check on his brother’s safety as his house had been attacked as local youth targeted the Henry Taggart Army base located near by. Noel Phillips, a young man of 19 years, having just finished work walked to Springfield park to check on the local situation.


Without warning the British Army opened fire from the direct of the Henry Taggart Army base. The shooting was aimed directly at the gathering. In the panic people dispersed in all directions. Many people took refuge in a field directly opposite the army base. The army continued to fire and intensified their attack on this field.

Noel Phillips was shot in the back side. An injury that was later described in his autopsy as a flesh wound. As he lay crying for help, Joan Connolly, a mother of 8 went to his aid. Eye witnesses heard Joan call out to Noel saying “It’s alright son, I’m coming to you”.

In her attempt to aid Noel, Joan was shot in the face. When the gun fire stopped Noel Phillips, Joan Connolly, Joseph Murphy and many others lay wounded. Daniel Teggart, a father of 14, lay dead having been shot 14 times.

A short time later a British Army vehicle left the Henry Taggart Army base and entered the field. A solider exited the vehicle, and to the dismay of the local eye witnesses, executed the already wounded Noel Phillips by shooting him once behind each ear with a hand gun.

Soldiers then began lifting the wounded and dead and throwing them into the back of the vehicle. Joseph Murphy, who had been shot once in the leg, was also lifted along with the other victims and taken to the Henry Taggart Army base. Those lifted, including Joseph Murphy, were severely beaten. Soldiers brutally punched and kicked the victims. Soldiers jumped off bunks on top of victims and aggravated the victims’ existing wounds by forcing objects in to them. Mr Murphy was shot at close range with a rubber bullet into the wound he first received in the field. Mr Murphy died three weeks later from his injuries.

Joan Connolly, who had not been lifted by the soldiers when they first entered the field, lay wounded where she had been shot. Eye witnesses claimed Joan cried out for help for many hours. Joan was eventually removed from the field around 2:30am on 10th August. Autopsy reports state that Joan, having been repeatedly shot and bled to death.

10th August 1971

Eddie Doherty, a father of two from the St James’ area of West Belfast, had visited his elderly parents in the Turf Lodge area, on the evening of Tuesday 10th August to check on their safety during the ongoing unrest. He was making his way home along the Whiterock road, as he approached the West Rock area he noticed a barricade which had been erected by local people in an attempt to restrict access to the British Army.

A local man named Billy Whelan, known to Eddie, stopped him and the pair passed commented on the ongoing trouble. At the same time a British Army digger and Saracen moved in to dismantle the barricade. From the digger, a soldier from the Parachute Regiment opened fire. Eddie was fatally shot in the back. Local people carried him to neighbouring homes in an attempt to provide medical attention but Eddie died a short time later from a single gun shot wound.

11th August 1971

At roughly 4am on 11th August. John Laverty, a local man of 20 years, was shot and killed by soldiers from the British Army’s Parachute regiment. Joseph Corr, a local father of 6, was also shot and wounded by the same regiment. Mr Corr died of his injuries 16 days later. The Parachute Regiment’s account stated that both men were firing at the army and were killed as the army responded. Neither men were armed and ballistic and forensic evidence tested at the time disproved the army’s testimony.

Pat McCarthy, a local community worker who came to work in Ballymurphy from England, was shot in the hand on the same day as he was attempting to leave the local community centre to distribute milk and bread to neighbouring families. A few hours later and nursing his wounded hand, Pat decided to continue with the deliveries. He was stopped by soldiers from the British Army’s Parachute Regiment who harassed and beat him.

Eye witness’ watched in horror as the soldiers carried out a mock execution on Pat by placing a gun in his mouth and pulling the trigger, only for the gun to be unloaded. Pat suffered a massive heart attack and the same soldiers stopped local people from trying to help Pat. As a result Pat died from the ordeal.

John McKerr, a father of 8 and a carpenter from the Andersonstown Road area, was carrying out repair work in Corpus Christi chapel on the 11th August. John took a short break to allow the funeral of a local boy, who drowned in a swimming accident, to take place. As he waited outside the chapel for the funeral mass to end, John was shot once in the head by a British solider from the Army’s Parachute Regiment.

Despite the harassment of the British Army, local people went to his aid and remained at his side until an ambulance arrived. One local woman, named locally as Maureen Heath, argued with the soldiers as they refused to allow John to be taken in the ambulance. John was eventually taken to hospital but died of his injuries 9 days later having never regained consciousness."

DaMangags will know. Most of the alleged casualties were probably his sisters/brothers/uncles/aunts............
 
#4
The usual republican 'Bayoneting Babies' level of propaganda with every casualty cowardly shot in the back by the hated paratroopers whilst protecting children. Casualties 'named locally' and therefore may never have existed.
Not even Corbyn would believe it, even though he would swear it was true because he saw it with his own eyes, photographed it, but Boots lost the film/Paras stole his camera.
Interesting BBC article that blames the UVF

UVF to say it shot Ballymurphy victims


t's understood that the Ulster Volunteer Force (UVF) is to provide information to the Ballymurphy killings inquest claiming it was responsible for some of the shootings.

Members of the Parachute Regiment have always been held responsible for civilian deaths during three days of gunfire involving soldiers in a west Belfast neighbourhood in August 1971.

But "veterans" within the loyalist paramilitary organisation have identified a UVF sniper they say carried out a number of the shootings.

With an inquest scheduled to start in September, the information is to be provided to the Coroners Service within days.

One of those aware of the process described it as an attempt to shed some light on one of the most chaotic and notorious series of killings during the Troubles.

The shootings occurred amid disturbances sparked by the introduction of internment without trial in Northern Ireland.

Image caption Information has been provided on the weapon allegedly used by the UVF sniper
Ten people were shot dead, including a priest trying to aid one of the wounded and a mother-of-eight. Another man later died of heart failure.

Bereaved families have come to refer to the killings as the Ballymurphy massacre.

In a potentially major development, loyalists who were active at the time have come forward with the new allegations.

They approached an interlocutor to claim a UVF sniper located in the neighbouring Springmartin estate opened fire into Ballymurphy.

It is understood these paramilitary veterans have provided the gunman's name, alleging he was responsible for a number of the deaths.

Image caption Ten people were shot dead in west Belfast in the three days after internment was introduced in 1971, in what the bereaved families refer to as the Ballymurphy Massacre
Information has also been supplied on the rifle allegedly used, along with its subsequent seizure by the authorities.

"These men are adamant that if ballistic tests are carried out on the weapon it will establish that the UVF sniper did cause casualties, possibly fatal," the source said.

The interlocutor has now contacted a Belfast solicitor to discuss how the information is supplied to the Coroners Service.

Billy Hutchinson, leader of the Progressive Unionist Party, which has links to the UVF, claimed it was a significant move which could help provide clarity around what happened at Ballymurphy.

The Belfast councillor added: "The IRA should reciprocate and declare what, if anything, it knows about the events over those days."

Pádraig Ó Muirigh, a lawyer who represents a number of families bereaved in the Ballymurphy shootings, said: "Any new evidence relating to this inquest should be brought to the attention of the coroner as a matter of urgency, and in due course we will review this evidence in preparation for the inquest."

Image caption Pat Quinn said he felt 'numbed' by the claims
Pat Quinn, whose bother Frank was one of the victims, said he was feeling "numbed" and he found the UVF claim "dubious".

"Is it dirty tricks, or a publicity stunt or what?" he said.

"It seems to be muddying the waters," Mr Quinn added.

John Joseph Teggart, whose father Danny was killed in Ballymurphy said he was "sceptical about the story".

"Questions need to be asked about the motivation," he said.
 
#6
The usual republican 'Bayoneting Babies' level of propaganda with every casualty cowardly shot in the back by the hated paratroopers whilst protecting children. Casualties 'named locally' and therefore may never have existed.
Not even Corbyn would believe it, even though he would swear it was true because he saw it with his own eyes, photographed it, but Boots lost the film/Paras stole his camera.
I work with Eddie Doherty's nephew, if that helps
 

ugly

LE
Moderator
#7
I cant imagine why we werent as popular as we could have been.
I recall taking part in a house search and the scribe was doing the who lives and no longer lives here bit. The old fella was almost in tears describing how one of his teeneage sons was lifted by the Greenjackets and never seen again. I had to leave the room as the Scribe was shaking trying not to laugh.
Ballymurphy, oft described by lads in my platoon as quite nice compared to where they had grown up poor feckers.
 

hotel_california

LE
Book Reviewer
#8
Massacre at Ballymurphy: Ch 4 tonight, 8 Sept 2018. 21:00.
 
#10
A short time later a British Army vehicle left the Henry Taggart Army base and entered the field. A solider exited the vehicle, and to the dismay of the local eye witnesses, executed the already wounded Noel Phillips by shooting him once behind each ear with a hand gun.
Seriously?
 
#13
#15
From what I've seen so far its hardly what you'd call balanced.
I'm interested to know when the families started 'searching for the truth'. Was it once Human Rights lawyers.....compensation.....and the current trend for enquiry after enquiry until the 'right' result became the norm.
 
#16
I’m watching on plus 1, is it worth carrying on or did Gerry Adams write all of it?
 
#18
Biggest load of crap I’ve ever read.

I joined 1RGJ in 1973 and served three tours in Northern Ireland beginning in 1973 in the Divis flats/Falls Road in Belfast, 1974/5 in Crossmaglen and South Armagh and 1977 in the New Lodge in Belfast. My experience was that unlike the terrorists that we opposed, we upheld the rule of law while robustly opposing their activities.

If any of the OP’s allegations had actually happened previously to my service there, they would have been known to me and my mates through the older and bolder telling us then newbies, what it was like.

Terrorist propaganda will always try to publicise crap like this despite it being blatantly untrue and it really doesn’t deserve to be given an airing on here.
 
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#19
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#20
I like the heavily implied criticism that the only official history was the testimony of soldiers involved. When the programme was based on the testimony of equally partisan residents. Another “search for the truth” (as long as it is the right kind of truth).
 

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