Ballistic turbans WTF!!

#1
PC madness outragebus

apologies if elsewhere...

please c'mon this is daft, next they'll (i'm not trying to be xenophobic or racist) be asking for dispensation for riding motorbikes... no hold on balistic turbans for the military - probably beat the MK6a :)

edit for mong spelling
 

Biped

LE
Book Reviewer
#3
Preparing for incoming . . .

Actually, I don't see a particular problem with their ask. The Sikhs are a 'warrior' caste, and thus, they like to get in amongst it. They have a good and honourable tradition of smashing in faces and slotting people on our behalf, and they are a nice bunch of bods too, so let's help them out with some headgear that allows them to bash skulls and shoot people.
 
#4
don't you have to get to the point where you just say, no that's not uniform and 'elf and safety say no too? so what happens with Sikhs in our army, i take it none of them are on the frontline then - i say there must be sikhs considering the amount of f;;;ing rat packs we take with us on ops!
 

seaweed

LE
Book Reviewer
#6
Some vague memory that I have seen old photos of Sikh regts in Burma in tin hats.

There was a Sikh in training with me at Dartmouth who took his turban off to play sports (at which he was rather good). He had his hair tied in a topknot with a twist of white cotton and that was apparently sufficient.

The motor bike thing was lunacy at the time and I knew we'd all live to regret it. I've NEVER seen anyone on a motor bike in a turban in all those years.
 
#8
My first reaction was "bwahahaha"
On second thoughts though, it doesn't seem that strange.
Still though, "ballistic turban", sounds like a record label or something.
 

seaweed

LE
Book Reviewer
#9
Shahbash, bradstyley.
 

Biped

LE
Book Reviewer
#10
Of course, it's not strictly speaking true that all Sikha have to have a turban. The less strict sikhs just wear their Patka, as do children and yoofs.



If this becomes an allowable norm amongst the Sikh police officers, then there's not drama in terms of fitting a ballistic lid over the top.

The item that the Indian Army allows their guys to wear is actually called a Pakta Helmet, and it's the same one in the piccy from the post by Bradstylee



The contractor that makes them is called 'Star Wire'

Of course, if push comes to shove, there's always this:

 
#11
Now obviously, in this modern age of balistics, a Sikh turban cannot be worn in combat. So an ingenious solution was developed; a headgear made of a ballistic strip manufactured from a high-density, die-pressed phantom steel and kevlar was made for Sikh soldiers that would go around the pagadi, as is shown in the following photos also of Punjab Regiment:

The point is they WANT to fight! So give it to them but please, off the shelve and not some expensive "newly developed by civil servants" turban.
 
#12
 
#14
seaweed said:
Some vague memory that I have seen old photos of Sikh regts in Burma in tin hats.

There was a Sikh in training with me at Dartmouth who took his turban off to play sports (at which he was rather good). He had his hair tied in a topknot with a twist of white cotton and that was apparently sufficient.

The motor bike thing was lunacy at the time and I knew we'd all live to regret it. I've NEVER seen anyone on a motor bike in a turban in all those years.
A good number of years ago there was a world-class tennis player who was Sikh. I recall him playing at the US National Doubles (Grass, at Longwood CC) with his hair pulled into a topknot sort of thing covered with a white cloth like a handkerchief and tied. I recall it distinctly as it was the size and shape of a tennis ball in the days when tennis ball were all white so it looked a bit like a tennis ball on his head. If the principal is to cover the hair a cloth and helmet combination should work.

Maybe the Sikh police could consult a priest/minister of their faith about the details of their hair covering. Many places make some allowance for religous practices. I have run into a US chaplain with a cammy yarmulka (sp?).
 
#16
" the Patka helmet offered superior protection around the forehead and sides of the head from shrapnel and debris from IEDs and mines compared to the helmet. The standard bullet-proof helmets only provided protection against 9mm weapons, whereas patka helmets gave superior protection against AK-47 to the forehead and rest of the head area. It is also remarkably light and easy to customize that allowed for a lot of the customization of kit that can be seen in deployed units.

As such, the Patka helmet has been unofficially adopted as the headgear of choice for all troops on COIN and anti-terror missions, across all regiments and police units. "



http://www.militaryphotos.net/forums/showthread.php?t=139678&page=2

Job done
 
#18
This problem really seems to be stuck "inside the box".

I'll be first to admit that I don't know a whole bunch about the sikh religion however some things just seem like common sense.

Why would you ask for things to be developed without looking at a common sense approach to it?

First, what qualifies as a "turban"? I would think an ultra thin turban made of nylon or some other material that could easily fit under a helmet is probably the most obvious answer.

If that doesn't qualify as one, not sure how a helmet would.

If it's to be worn on the outside, why not simply a turban like helmet cover?

Second, if the turban is not allowed to come off, then how are other policies being met? ie: Personal hygiene, critter checks, etc?

Is a "turban helmet" really the best answer?
 
#19

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