BAE shop steward cnuts

#1
I'm on a train to Birmingham today, and opposite were a couple of scruffy fat, droopy eyed cunts and a similarly suited fat cunt on the way to some sort of leftist union gathering on Broad street. Amongst their usual commie drivel I was astounded when they loudly started talking about their thoughts on striking if proposed cuts come into force at various locations across BAE's estate. In addition I learnt all about which systems the army was going to scale down on and withdraw completely.

You fat useless wankers; I hope you all get cancer.

Edited to correct the street name they mentioned meeting at.
 
#2
Serves you right for travelling standard class.
 
#5
I remember been on strike and spending days sat in the pub watching our management cnuts going into work. Even got strike pay off the GMB.
 
#6
Cpl_ripper said:
I remember been on strike and spending days sat in the pub watching our management cnuts going into work. Even got strike pay off the GMB.
I remember being on strike outside Hobart Barracks in Detmold. Strike pay? We didn't even get a cup of coffee which is probably why the whole thing only lasted a couple of hours.
 
#8
Proberbly the ones that strike the most!
 
#9
Hopefully they'll take an axe to the useless, lazy, arrogant tw@s at Barrow. If you want to know why the British shipbuilding industry collapsed, just take a wander around the yard at Barrow.
 
#10
mnairb said:
Hopefully they'll take an axe to the useless, lazy, arrogant tw@s at Barrow. If you want to know why the British shipbuilding industry collapsed, just take a wander around the yard at Barrow.
Barrow? You think they are bad there?
You never saw the Swan Hunter workforce in action (or complete lack of) then?
 

Bouillabaisse

LE
Book Reviewer
#11
jagman said:
mnairb said:
Hopefully they'll take an axe to the useless, lazy, arrogant tw@s at Barrow. If you want to know why the British shipbuilding industry collapsed, just take a wander around the yard at Barrow.
Barrow? You think they are bad there?
You never saw the Swan Hunter workforce in action (or complete lack of) then?
I remember being shown pictures of one of the T23 frigates in build at Swans, taken by a PO Seaman on a visit. The deck area around some of the external hatches were covered in rust, which a dockyard matey was busy painting over to cover it up.
 
#12
mistersoft said:
Cpl_ripper said:
I remember been on strike and spending days sat in the pub watching our management cnuts going into work. Even got strike pay off the GMB.
I remember being on strike outside Hobart Barracks in Detmold. Strike pay? We didn't even get a cup of coffee which is probably why the whole thing only lasted a couple of hours.
Which Regt were you? :D :D :D
 
#13
'Barrow? You think they are bad there?
You never saw the Swan Hunter workforce in action (or complete lack of) then?'

The difference is, Barrow is still an active yard - you can see why British Shipyards don't get commercial orders any more, we can't compete on price, schedule or quality.
 
#14
mnairb said:
'Barrow? You think they are bad there?
You never saw the Swan Hunter workforce in action (or complete lack of) then?'

The difference is, Barrow is still an active yard - you can see why British Shipyards don't get commercial orders any more, we can't compete on price, schedule or quality.
Or work ethic?
 
#15
mnairb said:
'Barrow? You think they are bad there?
You never saw the Swan Hunter workforce in action (or complete lack of) then?'

The difference is, Barrow is still an active yard - you can see why British Shipyards don't get commercial orders any more, we can't compete on price, schedule or quality.
But we could, very easily.
In the bad old days of Swan Hunter having their entire nightshift sleeping the hours away it was entirely down to bad management who were afraid of the union.
Unions and bad management, not a brilliant combination.

Properly motivated we could easily lead the world.
 

Bouillabaisse

LE
Book Reviewer
#16
To defend BAE shipbuilding (and I will have to have a shower afterwards) they do produce good ships. Possibly too good for the export market. The last export order BAE proper had (standfast their new acquisition of the old Vospers) were the Brunei ships - not a success with the customer - and the malaysian frigates - a great success with the customer, who would like some more but can't afford them.
 

Bouillabaisse

LE
Book Reviewer
#17
And to add, when the Type 23's came up for sale to appease treasury the Chileans almost snapped our arm off at the shoulder taking them, despite having just bought 4 Dutch ships
 
#18
'To defend BAE shipbuilding (and I will have to have a shower afterwards) they do produce good ships. Possibly too good for the export market. The last export order BAE proper had (standfast their new acquisition of the old Vospers) were the Brunei ships - not a success with the customer - and the malaysian frigates - a great success with the customer, who would like some more but can't afford them.'

First bold - usually considerably late, LPDRs were 7 years late, Auxiliary Oilers were late and the Type 45s are going out late without main armament.

Second bold - are these the ones that the Malaysians didn't want and are still tied up alongside in Barrow? No one will buy them because the deck roofs are too low.

As for the night shift at Swan Hunter sleeping all night, do you really think that it is different at other yards?
 

Bouillabaisse

LE
Book Reviewer
#19
Its the Brunei ships that no one wants. The malaysians have a variant of them, but with a hanger, and they love them. The Brunei Navy were bounced into ordering those frigates by the British govt and were clearly too advanced and manpower intensive for them. A good example of selling a customer what you want him to have, not what he wants. It rarely leaves a satisfied customer.

I've not been aboard the Brunei ships but I can't help thinking that the deckhead height thing is a myth. Why would BAE significantly alter their standard export ship design just to lower the passageways etc because the customer didn't need them? It would be vastly expensive to do and rather pointless. I think the main disposal problem with the ships is that they were effectively completed in the late 1990s and as a result the combat systems are '80s and early '90s designs which would need updating.
 

Bouillabaisse

LE
Book Reviewer
#20
I don't know about worker attitudes, but its also about government support, none of which has gone to shipbuilding for years. The successful yards in Europe, building export warships and, more lucratively export cruise liners and merchant ships, have all built up using (slightly illegal) government support. For example, the German yards producing crusise liners and the Thyssen group making Meko frigates for export are doing nicely thanks to German govt support and encouragement. Similarly the French yards DCN (govt-owned and controlled) and Alstom at St Nazaire, or the Spanish Navantia. All supported overtly or covertly by a government that cares about jobs and capability.

The common factor between the Germans and the French is that they also offer for export fairly basic and cheap frigates and can point to a track record of doing so for export and domestic consumption. The Meko is the Ford Mondeo of frigates -basic, simple and cheap, but if you want a top spec one you can get the leather seats and a V6. And they'll help you build it at home if you want
 

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