BAE and MOD Research into Risk Free Weapons

#1
Thought you may enjoy this letter sent to BAE by www.nannyknowsbest.com re their research into risk free weapons:

"Following on from recent reports in the media about BAE's research into environmentally friendly weapons and armour, one of our regular readers has come up with a solution that is both economically and environmentally viable.

He proposes that we abandon high tech weaponry, which is expensive in terms of resources and environmental impact, and revert to using tried and trusted "old" sustainable technologies such as bows and arrows.

The wood for the bows/arrows can be harvested from sustainable forests, and the tips for the arrows can be made from recycled materials.

We at Nanny Knows Best are very excited by this idea, and know that you will be as well.

Please feel free to contact us if you need any further details.

Best regards

Nanny Knows Best"

Source http://nannyknowsbest.blogspot.com/2006/09/risk-free-weapons-ii.html
 
#2
kenfrost said:
Thought you may enjoy this letter sent to BAE by www.nannyknowsbest.com re their research into risk free weapons:

"Following on from recent reports in the media about BAE's research into environmentally friendly weapons and armour, one of our regular readers has come up with a solution that is both economically and environmentally viable.

He proposes that we abandon high tech weaponry, which is expensive in terms of resources and environmental impact, and revert to using tried and trusted "old" sustainable technologies such as bows and arrows.

The wood for the bows/arrows can be harvested from sustainable forests, and the tips for the arrows can be made from recycled materials.

We at Nanny Knows Best are very excited by this idea, and know that you will be as well.

Please feel free to contact us if you need any further details.

Best regards

Nanny Knows Best"

Source http://nannyknowsbest.blogspot.com/2006/09/risk-free-weapons-ii.html
Not so daft really...

It wasn't until the 1850s and the introduction of the Minie rifle that the British infantry had a weapon with the range, accuracy and penetration of the longbow.

Arguably, it wasn't until the late 1880s that we had a rifle which matched the rate of fire of a longbow.

The only advantage of the musket was that it needed less training and practice.
 
#4
Of course, the length of time training a bowman is neglible :D Prospective bowmen wouldn't have to spend long periods of time training their arms to pull back the string, and fireing from the prone may be a bit tricky.

We should have frickin lasers by now.
 

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