Bad day for Brock

C

cloudbuster

Guest
#41
Oh that's right- some yoghurt weaving vegan **** bubble said they looked nice, the anthropomorphic shit kickers.
What a horrible way to describe a fellow-Arrser. He only wrote;

no-body said:
The cull starts today, I don't agree with it as I think the 'evidence' for the transmission of Bovine TB is flimsy at best. 5000 rather lovely wild animals to be killed as a 'test' case? Doesn't seem right....
 
#44
I say we take off and nuke the sett from orbit - it's the only way to be sure.
Can we start with Liverpool?
 
#45
I don't think for one second that you'd be looking at leaving the sett open for repopulation after gassing - you'd clearly have a follow up, collapsing the set entrances and revisiting. The bacterium only has a limited survival period outside the body so you'd follow up accordingly - say for the next 3 to 6 months. Equally your other point, about creating a vacuum, shows why it would be self defeating to kill healthy badger populations.
Destroying setts is a waste of time. It's not the tunnels they're interested in. It's the territory.
 
#50
#52
Destroying setts is a waste of time. It's not the tunnels they're interested in. It's the territory.
Make your mind up - a minute ago you were saying


If the immigrant population were not infected they certainly would be infected once they move in to the vacant sets.

If clean badgers move into the area, and take over the territory, then they can't get infected because

i) you've collapsed the set
ii) the cattle are clean and
iii) the bacterium isn't persistent for long outside living animals

- then theres no problem
 
#53
Had to laugh when this cull was stopped due to lack of experience in shooting them!

Lots of good points raised in this thread. All gone over many times on farming sites. Essentially yes they are carriers and do spread BTB, However they (in my opinion) are a very small link in the chain. Deer, cats, dogs sheep can carry as well. I am by no means an expert and thank the gods it hasn't affected me or my neighbours But it I have observed that farms run badly and not heeding the DEFRA/DARD advice or next to such a farm are more susceptible to BTB.
People where I live will shoot a shadow for the sport so in effect there is a Badger cull in my area. one farm near by though has lost 50 cattle since Christmas to BTB. My personal opinion why he has it is because he's a bad farmer.
Gandhi said you can judge a society by the way it treats it's animals. You should judge farmers the same way.
 
#54
For the terminally hard of thinking it should be remembered that NOT shooting badgers was the experiment. Until 1981 a land owner could legally shoot badgers. The experiment has failed because badgers spread Tb.

Time to repeal the experimental legislation which protected badgers and get back to normal, managed shooting of badgers. Keeping numbers maintained by letting responsible land owners and their agents cull spikes in population growth works for foxes, deer and rabbits. Why not for badgers? Oh that's right- some yoghurt weaving vegan **** bubble said they looked nice, the anthropomorphic shit kickers.
Just what the man said.

Badgers in the wild have no natural predator in this country. TB or no TB numbers have to be kept in check. The same goes for foxes and deer. Unless Wolves are re-introduced (and listen to the outcry there when the first kid gets mauled) eventually numbers will just explode.
I am a pest controller but have no agenda against badgers. I love to see them roaming free. But reducing the numbers is something needs to be done, and if there is a proven link with Bovine TB then there is no case to answer.
 
#55
By wiping out the Set you leave a vacuum to be filled by neighbouring badgers. If the immigrant population were not infected they certainly would be infected once they move in to the vacant sets. Spot culling wouldn't work.
And yet the experience of thirty years ago seems to indicate that ring culling did work - although you do have to fill in the setts as far as possible.

EDIT: You will get new badgers moving in, hopefully clean ones but if they're dirty well you have to start again. Part of the problem is at the moment that they're far too thick on the ground so they're bound to spread.

What probably needs deciding is just how many setts/sq mile is optimal and trying to keep them there.
 
#56
And yet the experience of thirty years ago seems to indicate that ring culling did work - although you do have to fill in the setts as far as possible.
Culling in general works. Pussy-footing about probably wouldn't.
 
#57
Just what the man said.

Badgers in the wild have no natural predator in this country. TB or no TB numbers have to be kept in check. The same goes for foxes and deer. Unless Wolves are re-introduced (and listen to the outcry there when the first kid gets mauled) eventually numbers will just explode.
I am a pest controller but have no agenda against badgers. I love to see them roaming free. But reducing the numbers is something needs to be done, and if there is a proven link with Bovine TB then there is no case to answer.
Funnily enough its the same with deer, as they have no natural predators in the UK, unless they are culled their population rises causing (in some cases) starvation. One well documented case was on a deer sanctuary run by some tree hugging organisation where many of the deer starved to death due to overpopulation.
 
#58
One well documented case was on a deer sanctuary run by some tree hugging organisation where many of the deer starved to death due to overpopulation.
I think that was Stella McCuntny. Dozy bitch.
 
C

cloudbuster

Guest
#59
One well documented case was on a deer sanctuary run by some tree hugging organisation where many of the deer starved to death due to overpopulation.
Wasn't Norton Manor camp, was it?
 
#60
Lift the protection and leave the farmer to deal with them as he wishes.
It's his land and his right to care for/protect his property/herds as he wishes
 

Similar threads

Latest Threads

Top