Bad day for Brock

#21
Sadly cost is a growing factor . Beef and dairy farmers make f*ck all as it is , so the cost of innoculation should not fall on them .
In 30 years time , when food is about 4 times more expensive than now , no -one is going to give a flying f*ck about badgers .

On another note , badgers are very useful for preventing unwanted development .
Simply capture some badgers , put them where Barratts or Tesco intend to build , photograph and complain .
Badgers , the only creature with more rights than travellers .
 
#22
You wooly liberal!:hug: I think Slipperman has come up with a plan though, much more fun than bunnies, which kinda just sit there when you put the lamp on them, kinda unsporting really...
It could be more fun with chavs, so called popstars etc, as they won't stay frozen in the headlamps, which will merely add to the sport as they try desperately to return to the shadows!
 

cpunk

LE
Moderator
#23
By the look of the roads around Ludlow, the local badgers have decided to cull themselves and save the farmers their ammunition.
 
#25
We have badgers that visit our garden. Beautiful animals.

Shropshire would be an even better place if they concentrated on controls against dribbling vermin like Otis Ferry and his chums instead.

Leave the badgers alone, there's too many killed on the roads and by bastards that dig them out for illegal fights before dumping them as it is.
 
#26
By the look of the roads around Ludlow, the local badgers have decided to cull themselves and save the farmers their ammunition.
Badgers around Ludlow have been having the shit shot out of them for decades. They're dumped on the road and run over to conceal the bullet holes. South Shropshire has been quietly taking care of the badger problem itself, as have most remote, under policed regions across the UK.
 
#27
Badgers around Ludlow have been having the shit shot out of them for decades. They're dumped on the road and run over to conceal the bullet holes. South Shropshire has been quietly taking care of the badger problem itself, as have most remote, under policed regions across the UK.
You got it. Most roadside badger carcasses were put there by farmers who've been culling them illegally for years.
 
#28
Interesting piece on Ireland today where they have been culling badgers for some time now, TB rates in cattle have fallen. Of course each side will be able to wheel out experts with statistics! I would prefer to see the fields around us with healthy cattle rather than empty except for some cute badgers running around, but if possible would prefer to see some form of inoculation used to sort the problem out.

You catch em and hold em , I`ll jab em.
 
#31
bovinetb.blogspot.co.uk/ for a start, it debunks most of the utter bollocks spouted by badgerists - and government.

At the moment there is no cattle vaccine that is better than about 50-60% at best and even if there was an effective badger vaccine, which there isn't, how would it be administered reliably to the 500,000+ badgers in Britain? That's before you consider THAT YOU CAN'T VACCINATE INFECTED ANIMALS, so vaccination is mostly pointless until the disease is under control.

As to where they are a cause of spread, only the deeply disingenuous (ie most badgerists) really deny it, everybody else waffles about "unconfirmed links" yet DEFRA advises people not to handle dead badgers and recommends that cattle food, minerals and water be placed off the ground in such a way as to make it inaccessible to badgers.
The thing is that unlike cattle (and people, is is a zoonoses after all) TB in badgers doesn't lodge mainly in the lungs, there are foci throughout their bodies and particularly in the urinary tract - they basically piss live bacteria and due to the infection they are also incontinent.

Then there's the simple epidemiology - while badgers were being culled, before the last Tory government gave them "super-protection" the incidence of BTb dropped and was nearly eradicated. One can actually work out the years in which badger culling was further restricted because subsequent years always show a step up in cattle infection.
Of course the Irish experience, where TB breakdowns have shown almost the opposite trend to that of the UK since they started culling, in fact the graphs of our infection rate compared with theirs cross as our rate rockets and theirs plummets.


Mind you, I'm not sure that free shooting will really help to bring TB under control, although it will help the other less important species like hedgehogs (haven't seen on in years, used to be loads), skylarks and lapwings that badgers are annihilating.
I think that the only effective method of bringing the outbreak under control is going to be to locate and kill infected setts and then fill them in. This was the policy that nearly wiped out the disease in the late 70s/early 80s until gassing was banned.
 
#32
The farmers DO win again. There is an effective bovine TB inoculant on the market, but it is not seen as a viable solution due to costs. So, money versus badgers - money wins.

Vaccination against bTB is explicitly forbidden in the EU legislation on disease control (Council Directive 78/52/EEC) and implicitly also in intra-Union trade legislation, as vaccination is not compatible with the provisions for testing and herd qualification (Council Directive 64/432/EEC). EU legislation is fully in line with OIE standards on international trade and can be changed only by the European Parliament and the Council.

The main reason for the current vaccination ban is due to the possibility that vaccinated animals are not fully protected against bTB infection. Due to the suboptimal protection induced by the available vaccines (live BCG vaccine), vaccinated animals may become infected if exposed to the disease agent and then they cannot be distinguished from the non- infected vaccinated animals, due to the interference of vaccination with existing diagnostic methods (PPD-tuberculin skin test). This would jeopardise current bTB control and eradication policy.



So there!
 
#34
Mind you, I'm not sure that free shooting will really help to bring TB under control, although it will help the other less important species like hedgehogs (haven't seen on in years, used to be loads), skylarks and lapwings that badgers are annihilating.
I think that the only effective method of bringing the outbreak under control is going to be to locate and kill infected setts and then fill them in. This was the policy that nearly wiped out the disease in the late 70s/early 80s until gassing was banned.
Couldn't agree more - trap one, test for BTB and if test is positive then gas the whole colony, its the only way to do it properly.
 
#35
Couldn't agree more - trap one, test for BTB and if test is positive then gas the whole colony, its the only way to do it properly.
By wiping out the Set you leave a vacuum to be filled by neighbouring badgers. If the immigrant population were not infected they certainly would be infected once they move in to the vacant sets. Spot culling wouldn't work.
 
#38
By wiping out the Set you leave a vacuum to be filled by neighbouring badgers. If the immigrant population were not infected they certainly would be infected once they move in to the vacant sets. Spot culling wouldn't work.
It would if you used phos grenades....
 
#39
For the terminally hard of thinking it should be remembered that NOT shooting badgers was the experiment. Until 1981 a land owner could legally shoot badgers. The experiment has failed because badgers spread Tb.

Time to repeal the experimental legislation which protected badgers and get back to normal, managed shooting of badgers. Keeping numbers maintained by letting responsible land owners and their agents cull spikes in population growth works for foxes, deer and rabbits. Why not for badgers? Oh that's right- some yoghurt weaving vegan **** bubble said they looked nice, the anthropomorphic shit kickers.
 
#40
By wiping out the Set you leave a vacuum to be filled by neighbouring badgers. If the immigrant population were not infected they certainly would be infected once they move in to the vacant sets. Spot culling wouldn't work.
I don't think for one second that you'd be looking at leaving the sett open for repopulation after gassing - you'd clearly have a follow up, collapsing the set entrances and revisiting. The bacterium only has a limited survival period outside the body so you'd follow up accordingly - say for the next 3 to 6 months. Equally your other point, about creating a vacuum, shows why it would be self defeating to kill healthy badger populations.

It would if you used phos grenades....
[video=youtube;CgztUzqaL3E]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CgztUzqaL3E[/video]
 

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