Bad day for Brock

#1
The cull starts today, I don't agree with it as I think the 'evidence' for the transmission of Bovine TB is flimsy at best. 5000 rather lovely wild animals to be killed as a 'test' case? Doesn't seem right....
 
D

Davetheclown

Guest
#4
farmers lobby wins again, still dont think there is a link to bovine tb, also if there was just proves farmers are profiteering bastards.
 
#7
Admittedly, I've not really looked in the right places (at the right time), but the only badgers you see around this way are stiff ones lying squashed by the A303 - no cull needed here.
 
D

Davetheclown

Guest
#8
Admittedly, I've not really looked in the right places (at the right time), but the only badgers you see around this way are stiff ones lying squashed by the A303 - no cull needed here.

if they are really stiff, and have a yellow lollypop each side thats a zebra crossing, police have asked you to stop leaving flowers at these sites, thank you,
 
#9
Interesting piece on Ireland today where they have been culling badgers for some time now, TB rates in cattle have fallen. Of course each side will be able to wheel out experts with statistics! I would prefer to see the fields around us with healthy cattle rather than empty except for some cute badgers running around, but if possible would prefer to see some form of inoculation used to sort the problem out.
 
#11
if they are really stiff, and have a yellow lollypop each side thats a zebra crossing, police have asked you to stop leaving flowers at these sites, thank you,
Not really one for roadside shrines, or culls on wildlife come to that. In my (very humble) opinion, this is just another piece of knee-jerk tinkering by our glorious leaders, similar to the ban on foxhunting. Piss ups and breweries spring to mind.
Now, if they were to introduce a cull around some of the grottiest estates of Britain (see other thread for details), or even some of the TV studios (Jeremy Kyle, BGT, The Voice etc) I may lend my support to something like that.
 
#12
As there are so many objections to killing them , why not re-home in the big cities , preferably in the homes of the objectors ?
 
#13
As there are so many objections to killing them , why not re-home in the big cities , preferably in the homes of the objectors ?

I'm not a tied to a tree, brown rice eating, sandle wearing 'objector', I just think the evidence is flimsy that they need to be shot... I do, for example, think Slipperman maybe onto something! Thinking outside the box, I like it.
 
#14
farmers lobby wins again, still dont think there is a link to bovine tb, also if there was just proves farmers are profiteering bastards.
Whilst I dislike farmers (on the grounds I am jealous of all their laaaand) at least they have to provide and care for their flock unlike commercial fishermen who just RAPE the sea's and complain sensible people cut quota's to ensure the thick as **** fishermen dont take every breeding stock in the sea.

Feel better now.

I was staying in a cottage in Newcastleton once and on the way back from Hawick we were pulled over whilst a number of police and ambulance went past, about 10 minutes later we pass a cottage with all these forensics in white paper suits.

3 hours later with the feet up by a log fire we hear the guy in the cottage was dead from TB - apparently he had been making drum skins from roadkill badgers.

I hope some of those ******* who did them badgers out to kill them with dogs all get a good fatal dose.

Anyway, back on thread, I am comfortable with 5000 coes being burned, I was starting to get paranois as the number of cow on human attacks had increased lately, next step is gangs of cows shitting on the cenotaph.
 
#15
Interesting piece on Ireland today where they have been culling badgers for some time now, TB rates in cattle have fallen. Of course each side will be able to wheel out experts with statistics! I would prefer to see the fields around us with healthy cattle rather than empty except for some cute badgers running around, but if possible would prefer to see some form of inoculation used to sort the problem out.
If we want badgers and cows to co-exist peacefully, couldnt we just keep the cows inside in really small boxes with just a treadmill for exercise. We could call them Battery Cows and this has double meaning, keeping them indoors means we could trap the methane and capture electricity from the turning treadmills to provide them heat, a bit of light and some electronic feeding system.

Then we just leave them until they are grown and ready for the cull. Dont even need to go in there unless the tradmills stop turning - even then you could just use one of those arcade style hooks to picj them up and throw them in the heater and drop another calf in.

Its the future.

Bit like Mushrooms.
 
C

cloudbuster

Guest
#16
Its obvious that this subject has kept you occupied for some considerable time.


Thankfully.
 
#17
Most evidence points to Badgers being infected by cattle. Buuut Badgers can spread the infection. However culling Badgers in one area leads to recolonisation of the culled area by Other Badgers and the circle of infection/reinfection remains.
most farmers I have known who have a downer on Badgers say they get into food bins to eat cattle nuts and infect that way. usually they are the farmers that have crappy indoor conditions for the cattle/bad pasture etc. Good farmers that get infected cattle to me always seem to have a bad farming neighbour.
Ireland has seen a decrese in reactor cattle and infected cattle true but that may be down to the majority of infected cattle being culled and a more robust approach by their version of DARD.
One area of research into the problem often seems to be overlooked. Modern farming looks towards high yeald grasses without what could be termed "weeds" growing alongside the grasses. high levels of clover (especially red clover) may have beneficial properties.
All the Badger sets I know are well out of the way of humans and cattle. true they go into fields where cattle are but mostly on the peripheries. they are very solitary animals. they also help by eating rats and mice.
Just so I'm not thought of a wooly liberal I want to put on record blasting bunnies makes me smile.
 
#18
Most evidence points to Badgers being infected by cattle. Buuut Badgers can spread the infection. However culling Badgers in one area leads to recolonisation of the culled area by Other Badgers and the circle of infection/reinfection remains.
most farmers I have known who have a downer on Badgers say they get into food bins to eat cattle nuts and infect that way. usually they are the farmers that have crappy indoor conditions for the cattle/bad pasture etc. Good farmers that get infected cattle to me always seem to have a bad farming neighbour.
Ireland has seen a decrese in reactor cattle and infected cattle true but that may be down to the majority of infected cattle being culled and a more robust approach by their version of DARD.
One area of research into the problem often seems to be overlooked. Modern farming looks towards high yeald grasses without what could be termed "weeds" growing alongside the grasses. high levels of clover (especially red clover) may have beneficial properties.
All the Badger sets I know are well out of the way of humans and cattle. true they go into fields where cattle are but mostly on the peripheries. they are very solitary animals. they also help by eating rats and mice.
Just so I'm not thought of a wooly liberal I want to put on record blasting bunnies makes me smile.
You wooly liberal!:hug: I think Slipperman has come up with a plan though, much more fun than bunnies, which kinda just sit there when you put the lamp on them, kinda unsporting really...
 
#19
If we want badgers and cows to co-exist peacefully, couldnt we just keep the cows inside in really small boxes with just a treadmill for exercise. We could call them Battery Cows and this has double meaning, keeping them indoors means we could trap the methane and capture electricity from the turning treadmills to provide them heat, a bit of light and some electronic feeding system.

Then we just leave them until they are grown and ready for the cull. Dont even need to go in there unless the tradmills stop turning - even then you could just use one of those arcade style hooks to picj them up and throw them in the heater and drop another calf in.

Its the future.

Bit like Mushrooms.
Bit early for the plonk mate?

I think a lot of other solutions were tried or at least proposed?

Vaccination of badgers and cattle against bovine TB

http://www.hsi.org/assets/pdfs/badg...-5Humanenessresearchproposal31_5_12_FINAL.pdf
 
#20
Not on this side of the globe mate - nobody has introduced Badgers yet either.

However, in true historical style we could introduce Badgers to cull the Rats which feed the Snakes that eat the Spiders which kill the Dingoes which kill the Rabits who destroy the crops.
 
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