bacon....

Why are bacon producers allowed to inject bacon with water to increase the sale weight? You're not allowed to water down beer, adulterate bread to make it heavier, so why do bacon producers get away with it?

Just asking, but it seems wrong.
 
Well I suppose you could say it's like real bread and the chorleywood method of bread making we have now. Its still bread but not as good. Same as watery bacon. It's still bacon but a different version.
 
It's brine and not water they inject as it speeds up the curing process rather than leaving the loin in dry salt. More profitable.
 
Sneaky tesco sells ' Wiltshire cure ' as one if it's posh bacons. Wiltshire being brined with molasses and other stuff. I'm betting that's injected as well.
 
Sneaky tesco sells ' Wiltshire cure ' as one if it's posh bacons. Wiltshire being brined with molasses and other stuff. I'm betting that's injected as well.
Not just Tesco, they're all at it.
 
What I mean is someone unsuspecting might pick it up thinking it's dry cured as its marketed as the high end stuff. In reality it will Still shrink and boil in its own piss and weigh less.
Seems a bit underhand to me.
 
Don't buy bacon from a supermarket.
Find a local producer that dos'nt add that crap, does it traditional. Every town has at least one.
Support them.
 
Brine, the brine cures the bacon. That's the justification for it, but the two other effects inherent in the process are that it increases the weight and it ruins the bacon.

Dry cure bacon is cured by the traditional method of packing the meat in salt. It costs more.

I suspect most of the meat from the big supermarket chains is injected with water. I do a beef stew occasionally which involves first browning the diced meat. A pan of diced meat from a good butcher (Costco usually in my case) will produce a little water whilst browning, which boils off. A pan of diced meat from a supermarket chain will become a pan of water with shrunken bits of meat in it. By the time you've boiled that away, you've boiled the meat and ruined the dish.

When the water injection machinery first became available (1980s?), the manufacturers ran a notorious advert in some meat trade publication which said; " Why sell meat when you can sell water?" They only ran it once.

I'd like to have the added weight shown on the packaging. The only way to change things would be to change the laws. You need to remember that your MP doesn't usually have the interests of his constituents at heart, but those of the affluent and immoral people who have his constituents' money
 

jarrod248

LE
Gallery Guru
Brine, the brine cures the bacon. That's the justification for it, but the two other effects inherent in the process are that it increases the weight and it ruins the bacon.

Dry cure bacon is cured by the traditional method of packing the meat in salt. It costs more.

I suspect most of the meat from the big supermarket chains is injected with water. I do a beef stew occasionally which involves first browning the diced meat. A pan of diced meat from a good butcher (Costco usually in my case) will produce a little water whilst browning, which boils off. A pan of diced meat from a supermarket chain will become a pan of water with shrunken bits of meat in it. By the time you've boiled that away, you've boiled the meat and ruined the dish.

When the water injection machinery first became available (1980s?), the manufacturers ran a notorious advert in some meat trade publication which said; " Why sell meat when you can sell water?" They only ran it once.

I'd like to have the added weight shown on the packaging. The only way to change things would be to change the laws. You need to remember that your MP doesn't usually have the interests of his constituents at heart, but those of the affluent and immoral people who have his constituents' money
Added water is shown, don't buy it unless like the 'cooking bacon' it's very cheap.
 
Don't buy bacon from a supermarket.
Find a local producer that dos'nt add that crap, does it traditional. Every town has at least one.
Support them.
Or dry cure your own and smoke it with apple wood like I do. Approximately £15 -£17 for a boned out whole loin, then cut into two slabs to fit in the smoker. I say it myself, but it's damn good, and no white crap oozing out when you cook it.

SAM_0761.JPG
 
I am getting on a bit, but from my youth I remember proper bacon with rind that you could break a tooth on if crisped up properly. All back bacon used to have a pea sized bit of bone at the bottom.
I suppose production methods evolve.
I have a very good but expensive butcher in my high street but you still can't get the old traditional stuff.
I suppose its gone the way of white crumbly dogshit and become extinct.
 
The old adage if you get what you pay for applies. You have to admit that bacon is cheap as chips really. The good stuff just costs a bit more but I think that's still a reasonable price for what it is really. I will eat cheap bacon especially in a sarnie ( who won't? ) but if I'm buying that sarnie I do nit expect to pay a lot for it.
If I buy more expensive dry cure I treat it with more respect, Maybe as a cooked breakfast or added to pasta etc. Swings and roundabouts.
 
Don't buy bacon from a supermarket.
Find a local producer that dos'nt add that crap, does it traditional. Every town has at least one.
Support them.
Not much to add to that. Agree totally.

I have two local butchers, old school style. They both dry cure their own bacon which comes from Gloucester Old Spots. The rashers are virtually rigid and taste fantastic. None of that milky water stuff. It is also cheaper than Tesco. Good food does not necessarily mean more expensive.

I read somewhere that in the old days it used to take 12lbs of pork to make 1lb of bacon. Nowadays 1lb of pork can make 12lb of bacon. I am not sure I believe that (maybe the writer screwed up and the proper ratio was 1/1.2kg, which seems more realistic) but the general point stands.

The milky gunk is full of nitrates as well.
 
I am getting on a bit, but from my youth I remember proper bacon with rind that you could break a tooth on if crisped up properly. All back bacon used to have a pea sized bit of bone at the bottom.
I suppose production methods evolve.
I have a very good but expensive butcher in my high street but you still can't get the old traditional stuff.
I suppose its gone the way of white crumbly dogshit and become extinct.
Your butcher is a charlatan if he does not do proper traditional dry cure bacon. I have a good butcher to get mine from but there is another place who is frankly full of shit. His place is all twee and old timely to appeal yo the range Rover mummies but all his stuff comes in jointed and bagged already from wholesalers.
 
No the guy does it all on the premises apart from the curing.
You can still get streaky with proper rind but not the back bacon from my youth.

Agree about the Range rover mummies but last time I bought some streaky he had about six rashers priced at £4.25.
I am not willing to pay that whatever the quality.
 
I think I get about 325 grams for £4 ish. So probably about the same as super market stuff when you take into account it does not shrink. That's snobby Oxfordshire as well.
Find somewhere else!
 

Joshua Slocum

LE
Book Reviewer
any one remember that breakfast bacon you used to get in the 70s ?
it was strips without fat
quite nice between a couple of slices of bread
 
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