Bacon....curing and smoking.

Yep
There's no need whatsoever to heat it, especially if you're slicing, then freezing.
I'm wondering if those recipes are for baked ham, rather than bacon.
They all said 'bacon', Ned said above that he heats his to 150F too for his which is more Canadian bacon style. I don't care, it tastes good.

I have another on the go at the moment and will just slice it without the cooking part to see how that turns out - it ain't expensive to mess around with pig as the loins are only costing just over $2 a lb at the moment on speshul offer.
 
They all said 'bacon', Ned said above that he heats his to 150F too for his which is more Canadian bacon style. I don't care, it tastes good.

I have another on the go at the moment and will just slice it without the cooking part to see how that turns out - it ain't expensive to mess around with pig as the loins are only costing just over $2 a lb at the moment on speshul offer.
£4/kg is about the best I've found here & when I do, half a dozen go in the freezer for future use.
 
£4/kg is about the best I've found here & when I do, half a dozen go in the freezer for future use.
Been meaning to tell you; I did the bacon your way without heating and just leaving it in the fridge to air dry. It came out just as good as heating it through, no discernible difference really. So I now have around 6lbs, ummm 5.5lbs, ok, 5lbs of bacon in the freezer.

Damn sight better than the streaky American stuff.
 
Been meaning to tell you; I did the bacon your way without heating and just leaving it in the fridge to air dry. It came out just as good as heating it through, no discernible difference really. So I now have around 6lbs, ummm 5.5lbs, ok, 5lbs of bacon in the freezer.

Damn sight better than the streaky American stuff.
If you don't have one, get a cheap vac packer to use for when you freeze bacon, as it keeps much better.

If I decided to make my mate in NM some proper bacon, I wonder what ICE would make of 200g of curing salts in my luggage.... :eek:
 
If you don't have one, get a cheap vac packer to use for when you freeze bacon, as it keeps much better.

If I decided to make my mate in NM some proper bacon, I wonder what ICE would make of 200g of curing salts in my luggage.... :eek:
Prague powder? I got it off @mazon here, no probs.
 
So, after a few months of research, preparation and execution (pun intended), I've produced my first few batches of bacon.....all dry-cured smoked streaky.

I've been through numerous books, both old and new, and struggled to find a cure recipe that we genuinely traditional. For those interested, this website has excellent "how to" guides and an equally excellent cure calculator.


I started by finding good pork, in this case free range, organic pig direct from a local farmer.



Next, I built a cold smoker from an old oak wine barrel. I found an good Youtube video from NZ, and followed their instructions with a few minor alterations. The cold-smoke generator is "powered" by an aquarium pump.


This is the finished product.



The dry cure was applied to the pork, then the whole flitch is bagged up and vacuum sealed. It was left in the fridge for a week to cure, being turned daily to set.



After a week, I removed it from the bag and thoroughly washed it down to remove all traces of cure. It's then wrapped in muslin and tied off, after which I air dried it in the cellar (temp and humidity controlled) for four days. The bacon lost about 25% of its weight.



After drying, I removed the very slight white (harmless) mould with some vinegar on a clean cloth. Then into the cold smoker for eight hours over English oak.



The smoked flitch came out well, with that slightly oily texture that comes with a traditional recipe and proper air drying.





Lastly, I let the bacon sit inside another vacuum sealed bag for a couple of days for the smoke to infuse.

I bought a meat slicer and got to work.



Now packed up into vacuum bags, ready to go.



Finished product! It tastes wonderful, packed with that oily smokiness you know but can't necessarily describe. I'm really happy with the results, and am now onto batch four.

 
I don't think we should be so rash.

There's nothing he's really said or done so far that would warrant such action.

If it turns out there's no curing him, we'll smoke him out and do him up like a kipper!
 
So, after a few months of research, preparation and execution (pun intended), I've produced my first few batches of bacon.....all dry-cured smoked streaky.

I've been through numerous books, both old and new, and struggled to find a cure recipe that we genuinely traditional. For those interested, this website has excellent "how to" guides and an equally excellent cure calculator.


I started by finding good pork, in this case free range, organic pig direct from a local farmer.



Next, I built a cold smoker from an old oak wine barrel. I found an good Youtube video from NZ, and followed their instructions with a few minor alterations. The cold-smoke generator is "powered" by an aquarium pump.


This is the finished product.



The dry cure was applied to the pork, then the whole flitch is bagged up and vacuum sealed. It was left in the fridge for a week to cure, being turned daily to set.



After a week, I removed it from the bag and thoroughly washed it down to remove all traces of cure. It's then wrapped in muslin and tied off, after which I air dried it in the cellar (temp and humidity controlled) for four days. The bacon lost about 25% of its weight.



After drying, I removed the very slight white (harmless) mould with some vinegar on a clean cloth. Then into the cold smoker for eight hours over English oak.



The smoked flitch came out well, with that slightly oily texture that comes with a traditional recipe and proper air drying.





Lastly, I let the bacon sit inside another vacuum sealed bag for a couple of days for the smoke to infuse.

I bought a meat slicer and got to work.



Now packed up into vacuum bags, ready to go.



Finished product! It tastes wonderful, packed with that oily smokiness you know but can't necessarily describe. I'm really happy with the results, and am now onto batch four.

Well done, That looks really good. A lot of plastic getting used in these enlightened times though. What are the benefits of sealing in plastic compared to traditional methods?
 
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