Axed intelligence expert defiant

#1
http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/uk_politics/3960813.stm

An intelligence expert who lost his job with a Parliamentary committee after appearing on a BBC programme says he has no regrets about speaking out.
John Morrison told Panorama in July that Tony Blair's claim Saddam Hussein posed a direct threat prompted a "collective raspberry" in Whitehall.

Soon after the broadcast he lost his job as the Intelligence and Security Committee's chief investigator.

Mr Morrison told the BBC on Thursday he felt compelled to speak out.

He told the Today programme intelligence had been used as a "PR tool" since Tony Blair came to power.

"There was a culture of news management which came in after 1997 which I had not seen before and intelligence got swept up in that," said Mr Morrison, referring to his time as deputy chief of Defence Intelligence.
 
#2
Who would have thought it. An expert being given the sack for showing integrity and defending a keystone of our defence, just because he was not 'on message'!

Credibility is vital to intelligence and we have lost so much on account of this gov't, the sooner this culture of media management goe the better.
 
#3
PartTimePongo said:
http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/uk_politics/3960813.stm

An intelligence expert who lost his job with a Parliamentary committee after appearing on a BBC programme says he has no regrets about speaking out.
John Morrison told Panorama in July that Tony Blair's claim Saddam Hussein posed a direct threat prompted a "collective raspberry" in Whitehall.

Soon after the broadcast he lost his job as the Intelligence and Security Committee's chief investigator.

Mr Morrison told the BBC on Thursday he felt compelled to speak out.

He told the Today programme intelligence had been used as a "PR tool" since Tony Blair came to power.

"There was a culture of news management which came in after 1997 which I had not seen before and intelligence got swept up in that," said Mr Morrison, referring to his time as deputy chief of Defence Intelligence.
That was a fascinating interview this morning. Interesting (if not surprising) to hear that dangerous and counter-productive interference with intelligence did not start with this Iraq campaign, but goes back to Desert Fox and Kosovo.
 
#8
this whole scenario reminds me of the king in blackadder , played by Brian Blessed.

SQUIRE: Lord i have news from abroad , we are defeated in battle.

KING: WHAAAAAAAAT ! this news is no good , bring me some other news

SQUIRE: lord i have news from abroad , we are not defeated in battle

(or something like that)
 
#9
Blair 'used intelligence as PR tool'
John Morrison's interview plus reactions
couple of extracts:
The Tory leader, Michael Howard, however, said that Mr Morrison's comments were "extremely grave".

He told BBC Radio 4's The World at One: "What he has done today is to blow open the dodgy way this government operates," he said. "These are extremely grave allegations and their significance extends way beyond the war in Iraq.

He added: "It is a pattern of behaviour that has destroyed the trust which should be at the heart of our democracy and it goes right to the top. The person responsible is the prime minister and as long as he is there, trust in government can't be restored."

Mr Howard also dismissed the Ministry of Defence's response to Mr Morrison's comments. "The statement from the Ministry of Defence is a typical example of the kind of spin which I am criticising."
Mr Morrison once again said Mr Blair had been wrong to call Saddam Hussein a "threat".

"In intelligence terms, threat is a combination of capability and intention," he said. "If you have got the capability but you don't intend to do anyone any harm, you are not a threat.

"If you have got the intention but not the capability, then again you are not a threat.

"Now, we all thought Saddam had some weapons of mass destruction capability but there was never any realistic suggestion that he intended to use it.

"The only circumstances we thought ... he might use it was as a last resort if he was attacked.

"In the end, as we know, he did not have any WMD so he could not have been a threat in the correct intelligence term."

Mr Morrison said the contentious claim that Saddam could launch WMD in 45 minutes was given prominence in the government's dossier because "it was striking, it implied there was an immediate threat".

The lesson of the Butler inquiry was that "we need to be professional in the intelligence community and not to let enthusiasm carry one away".

"You can actually have a grown-up discussion in public without prejudicing intelligence sources and methods," he continued.

"The function of intelligence is to speak truth unto power. If it doesn't do that, it fails and I felt somebody had to speak up for intelligence standards. I did that. I got sacked and I don't regret it for a moment."
full story at http://politics.guardian.co.uk/print/0,3858,5049511-111381,00.html
 
Thread starter Similar threads Forum Replies Date
S Current Affairs, News and Analysis 0
D REME 48
S Army Pay, Claims & JPA 3

Similar threads

New Posts

Latest Threads