Army Rumour Service

This is a sample guest message. Register a free account today to become a member! Once signed in, you'll be able to participate on this site by adding your own topics and posts, as well as connect with other members through your own private inbox!

Awang anak Raweng GC

FORMER_FYRDMAN

LE
Book Reviewer
Came across this obituary on the Telegraph website and thought it deserved a wider airing:


I suspect that we won't hear much about it on BBC news - the wrong sort of minority in the wrong sort of war. It is, however, a reminder that there's actually a very positive multi-cultural history attached to the UK and a real foundation which could be built on. It just doesn't suit the preferred narrative of the ultra-liberals.

The article's behind a paywall so, by way of background:

 

lert

LE
If the citation mentioned in the Wiki article is correct (I mean that Wiki's right, not the citation itself) then the award of the GC is curious.

Rescuing a wounded comrade under fire from the enemy seems at odds with what I understand the criteria for the GC to be?
 

FORMER_FYRDMAN

LE
Book Reviewer
If the citation mentioned in the Wiki article is correct (I mean that Wiki's right, not the citation itself) then the award of the GC is curious.

Rescuing a wounded comrade under fire from the enemy seems at odds with what I understand the criteria for the GC to be?

The obituary mentions that it was because he was a civilian employee...
 
If the citation mentioned in the Wiki article is correct (I mean that Wiki's right, not the citation itself) then the award of the GC is curious.

Rescuing a wounded comrade under fire from the enemy seems at odds with what I understand the criteria for the GC to be?
Presumably the powers that be did not regard the conflict as a proper "war" or the terrorists to be a proper enemy, so that, as with Operation Banner, GC's were the highest awards for gallantry made.

ETA: Former Fyrdman appears to have given the correct answer
 

lert

LE
The obituary mentions that it was because he was a civilian employee...
According to Gov.uk:

Gov.uk said:
The Victoria Cross (VC) is the highest military decoration awarded for valour "in the face of the enemy" to members of the armed forces of various Commonwealth countries, and previous British Empire territories.

It takes precedence over all other orders, decorations and medals.

It may be awarded to a person of any rank in any service and to civilians under military command.

Apparently no award to a civilian since 1879. So while I'm not suggesting that the obit is a flat out falsehood, I suppose they could be interpreting what happened?
 

Helm

MIA
Moderator
Book Reviewer
According to Gov.uk:



Apparently no award to a civilian since 1879. So while I'm not suggesting that the obit is a flat out falsehood, I suppose they could be interpreting what happened?
The GC isn't the VC
 

rampant

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
According to Gov.uk:



Apparently no award to a civilian since 1879. So while I'm not suggesting that the obit is a flat out falsehood, I suppose they could be interpreting what happened?

Although the VC was originally given too civilians, such as during the Mutiny the rules were tightened and it became a purely military award. George VI had the GC instituted as an award for both military and civilians, the difference between the the two groups is that the mil personnel receive the GC for acts of bravery not in the face enemy, whilst civilians receive it for both.
 

lert

LE
Although the VC was originally given too civilians, such as during the Mutiny the rules were tightened and it became a purely military award. George VI had the GC instituted as an award for both military and civilians, the difference between the the two groups is that the mil personnel receive the GC for acts of bravery not in the face enemy, whilst civilians receive it for both.
Yes I know, that was the context of my reply to the OP.

The actions that lead to the award of the GC were very much in the face of the enemy. That's what seemed to make the award of the GC odd to me.
 

rampant

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
Yes I know, that was the context of my reply to the OP.

The actions that lead to the award of the GC were very much in the face of the enemy. That's what seemed to make the award of the GC odd to me.

He was a civi, attached to a mil force. Suffering through having the crap bombed out of you should also be classed as "In the Face of the Enemy" and could have been VC worthy during the 19th Century

But then the criteria has room for a bit of tweaking, VCs have been awarded for actions during an Operation but not technically in the face of the enemy. And there have been GCs awarded for taking on "the enemy".
 

Bodenplatte

War Hero
Historically VCs could be awarded for acts which were not "in the face of the enemy." Two incidents that spring to mind are several awards made to soldiers of the 24th Regiment who showed valour in an incident of saving life at sea (off the Andaman Islands in the 1860s ) and another who did something connected with a fire on an ammunition train in Canada during the Fenian Rebellion, again in the 1860s. A warrant of 1858 had specifically extended eligibility to such noncombat acts of valour, but perceptions changed and a "face of the enemy" requirement was introduced by a supplementary Royal Warrant in 1881.

Eligibility for the award of the VC was extended to civilians who were/are deemed to be acting under the control of military authorities by an early amendment warrant of 1859, and this has remained in force ever since. I think all such civilian recipients bar one were awarded in the Indian Mutiny, the exception being a clergyman in the Second Afghan War, 1879-80.
 
Kanang anak Langau

Kanang anak Langau is another Iban Dayak who originally served in the Sarawak Rangers as a tracker in Borneo during Confrontation, attached to 42 Cdo RM and 1 RNZIR. The Sarawak Rangers became the Royal Malaysian Ranger Regiment and he became a regular soldier.

He was awarded two of Malaysia's highest decorations for two seperate actions near the Malaysian/Thai border states against Communist Terrorists in the Second Emergency (1968 - 1989) in 1979 and 1980 less than a year apart.

He became Malaysia's most decorated soldier and retired after 21 years as a WO1. Highly regarded in Malaysia despite being a Christian both by the Armed Forces and the public there have been films and documentaries about him, some of which can be found on YouTube.

9132af_7396ac7ec28d4b078a421530622c15b4.jpg
index.jpg
CaD2AEeUAAADvs0.jpg
MV5BODExYjdkMzUtMDRhYS00ZmE5LWIxYzEtZGMwZGVhOWQwNmJkXkEyXkFqcGdeQXVyNjUwNjE2MDc@._V1_UY1200_CR...jpg
 

Latest Threads

Top