AW139 to replace USAF Hueys

Leonardo and Boeing just scored a nice contract to replace USAF Hueys, 4 initially ordered, 84 planned, main role is security of US Missile fields

An Italian-Designed, American-Built Helicopter Will Replace US Air Force Hueys
I also had the privilege of visiting Leonardo facility in USA (formerly Agusta Aerospace Corp then AW) outside Philly the same week. I have seen the first production , MH-139, and the second being assembled.

Delivery / replacing the UH-1N is going to happen with the first batch delivered 2021.

Cheers
 
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I also had the privilege of visiting Leonardo facility in USA (formerly Agusta Aerospace Corp then AW) outside Philly the same week. I have seen the first production , MH-139, and the second being assembled.

Delivery / replacing the UH-1N is going to happen with the first batch delivered 2021.

Cheers
Yup it will be different without the Huey's around here. That whop whop whop sound can be heard from so far away. Warren will get 11 of the new beasts.
 

seaweed

LE
Book Reviewer
RIP
The Huey is surely one of those iconic aircraft that was got just right, like the DC-3 in its various guises.
 
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The Huey is surely one of those iconic aircraft that was got just right, like the DC-3 in its various guises.
It is a long lasting bird. But at some point one has to move on!
 
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Weird day, the USAF managed to spin up 4 birds traveling South in a bit of a hurry.

IMG_0997.jpg
 
And now two pilots from the 413th Flight Test Squadron at Eglin AFB went up to Leonardo training facility in NJ to achieve their AW139 type ratings.

Cheers


7CD98DD1-77EA-4189-A409-CF2C065B994F.jpeg
 

Yokel

LE
Here are my photos of then AgustaWestland AW139 demonstrator rigged up as USAF HH139 demonstrator back in Heli Expo 2011 in Orlando. It was called the CVLSP (Common Vertical Lift Support Platform) program at the time before it got shoved aside. I have even the 3/4 ft posters promoting the 139 in blue VIP colors (as worn by the 1st Helicopter Squadron out of Andrews AFB) and in dark grey as the Helicopter Flight/Squadrons at the likes of Malstrom AFB, Minot etc.













This particular airframe ended up as National Security Demonstrator 2 years later on.

Cheers
Got any more pictures? Not of the helicopters, but of those girls!

Hueys in the Missile Fields are on their arse. Even when serviceable they struggled to meet Air Force Global Strike Command-mandated response time to the furthest silos.
In the old days, they maybe could have got a lift from USN Sea Kings (with nuclear capability)...

Hey, why the rush?
We really need to get to location XYZ...
No sweat - what have you got up there?
Nukes - in silos.
No shit - we have one of our own.
Huh?
Yeah - why do you think there is a bomb on the weapon pylon and we have loads of Marine Guards?
 
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Gen question... Are Huey's involved in any aspect of combat operations still, or is that just in the head of B film directors?

I wonder if the AW139 would.manage to hold the same complement of troops as the Huey variants?

Hopefully @Raven2008 can enlighten me.
USMC still uses the UH.

 
AFGSC Detachment 7 stood up at Duke Field for the MH-139A


also x 8 airframes coming int over the next few months.

And n the a/c soon


cheers
 
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Gen question... Are Huey's involved in any aspect of combat operations still, or is that just in the head of B film directors?

I wonder if the AW139 would.manage to hold the same complement of troops as the Huey variants?

Hopefully @Raven2008 can enlighten me.
This question has been answered and my information is a decade out of date but I’ll say that the Canadians were using them on ops in 2009 if only so I can post this picture which is one of my favourites, if only because it made me feel like I was in one of the war movies of my youth

A4D05D0B-CE2F-4F0F-AB4E-A50391E8719E.jpeg
 
Next H-for-heli MDS number was H-74 but looks like the marketing department won again. A bit like the jump from B-2 to B-21 for PR reasons.

They'll also have to split out that M multimission prefix before everything in the inventory uses it. UH-74 would have been perfectly fine but everyone wants the sexy M like the Spec Ops guys....
You dont want to be aboard MH370 if they ever get there.

What was the deal with the B-21 Raider PR?
 

Cyberhacker

Old-Salt
Next H-for-heli MDS number was H-74 but looks like the marketing department won again. A bit like the jump from B-2 to B-21 for PR reasons.
I thought the US named their various rotor wing types after native American tribes?
The Eurocopter EC-145 was "known as" the UH-145 during the trials and selection process, before being officially designated UH-72A and then named the Lakota

It will be interesting to see if this is an interim designation and name...
 
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I thought the US named their various rotor wing types after native American tribes?
The zoomies are trying something new. Funnily enough, no wolves are to be found in this corner of the land based deterrent.
 
Back when it was Agusta,there was a naming competition among users for the ordinary 139 and the Irish Air Corps, as one of the early users of a militarised 139, suggested "Wolfhound" but it was turned down.
 
Published by: Valerie Insinna, Defense News, on 15 June 2020.

US Air Force’s new Grey Wolf helicopter needs to watch its weight.

US Air Force’s new Grey Wolf helicopter needs to watch its weight


WASHINGTON — The U.S. Air Force’s new MH-139 Grey Wolf helicopter, which will replace the UH-1N Huey that guards nuclear missile fields, is at risk for bursting over its weight limit, a congressional watchdog said earlier this month.

The Grey Wolf — built by prime contractor Boeing and based on Italian aerospace firm Leonardo’s AW139 helicopter — appears to be gliding through its development phase, having completed its critical design review five months earlier than predicted in June 2019. However, the Government Accountability Office has voiced concerns that the final weight of the aircraft could be more than expected and lead to some performance drawbacks.

“The helicopter, as it is currently designed, may not be able to meet all performance requirements if the final weight of the aircraft exceeds design parameters,” the GAO said in a June report on major defense acquisition programs. “If an appropriate weight is not achieved, the aircraft may not be able to meet requirements for speed or range. Air Force officials stated that they expect to determine the final weight of the aircraft in December 2019.”

In response to questions from Defense News, the Air Force said it knew about the risk of excess weight since it awarded the contract to Boeing in 2018, and it is keeping an eye on the issue. date, the aircraft weight is within requirements to meet speed and range key performance parameters,” Air Force spokeswoman Maj. Cara Bousie said.

The MH-139 should be able to hit a 135-knot cruise speed and fly for at least 3 hours — and a minimum distance of 225 nautical miles — without needing to be refueled.

Like the UH-1N Huey before it, the Grey Wolf will be able to carry nine fully loaded troops, although the Air Force at one point considered a requirement for its Huey replacement helicopter to carry a larger number.

A weight gain could impact all of those performance characteristics.

The Air Force plans to buy 84 Grey Wolf helicopters over the course of the program. The aircraft will be used for a wide variety of missions, including defending intercontinental ballistic missile fields, search and rescue, and other activities in the national capital region.

The GAO identified one other issue as a possible source for cost and schedule growth: a possible Federal Aviation Administration requirement for additional testing of the engine’s power, which is needed to obtain airworthiness certification.

But “after discussions with the FAA, the Air Force does not anticipate additional testing will be required to demonstrate engine power,” Bousie said.

Boeing spokesman Jerry Drelling said the company continues to work with the FAA on MH-139 certification.

“We are working closely with our customer to execute the current joint flight test program in Florida, which started in December 2019,” he said. “As the Air Force mentioned previously, the test schedule remains on track to support the program milestones.”

The Air Force accepted its first MH-139 in December, one day after the first detachment was formed at Duke Field. The Air Force said at the time that Detachment 7 would eventually relocate to Malmstrom Air Force Base, Montana, and operate a total of four Grey Wolf helicopters in support of test and evaluation activities.

Boeing won a $2.38 billion firm, fixed-price award for the Huey replacement in September 2018, offering a price $1.7 billion less than the program’s initial estimate. Of that sum, so far the company has received an initial $375 million for the first four helicopters and the integration of military-specific items necessary for the AW139 to meet the Air Force’s requirements.

The Air Force is set to make a low-rate initial production decision in September 2021, the GAO said.

 
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